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RAA: Regional Airline Association (FAA7)

Radar Air Traffic Control Facility (RATCF): An air traffic control facility, located at a U.S. Naval or Marine Corps Air Station, utilizing surveillance, and normally, precision approach radar and air/ground communication equipment to provide approach control services to aircraft arriving, departing or transiting the airspace controlled by the facility. The facility may be operated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the United Sates Navy (USN), the United States Marine Corp (USMC), or the FAA & USN and service may be provided for both civil and military airports. (FAA13) (FAA14)

Radar Air Traffic Control Tower: An airport traffic control tower that uses radar and nonradar capabilities to provide approach control services to aircraft arriving, departing, or transiting airspace controlled by the facility. It provides radar air traffic control services to aircraft operating in the vicinity of one or more civil and/or military airports in the terminal area. (FAA13)

Radar Altimeter: Aircraft instrument that makes use of the reflection of radio waves from the ground to determine the height of the aircraft above the surface. (FAA6)

Radar Approach Control (RAPCON): An air traffic control facility, located at a U.S. Air Force (USAF) base, utilizing surveillance and, normally, precision approach radar and air/ground communication equipment to provide approach control services to aircraft arriving, departing, and transiting the airspace controlled by the facility. The facility may be operated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), or the United States Air Force (USAF). Service may be provided to both civil and military airports. (FAA13) (FAA14)

Radar Approach Control Tower: An airport traffic control tower (ATCT) that uses radar and non-radar capabilities to provide approach control services to aircraft arriving, departing, or transiting airspace controlled by the facility. It provides radar Air Traffic Control (ATC) services to aircraft operating in the vicinity of one or more civil and/or military airports in the terminal area In other words, a radar approach control tower is an ATCT at which airport traffic control specialists are permitted to provide radar approach control service, including extensive vectoring, as well as to handle takeoffs and landings. Radar Acts can be separated into a control tower and a radar room. (FAA10)

Radar Dome: A dome-shaped structure used to protect the antenna of a radar installation. (DOI4)

Radar Reflector: A device capable of or intended for reflecting radar signals. (DOI4)

Radio Contact: The initial radio call-up to a flight service station by en route aircraft, which includes a complete interchange of information and a termination of the contact. (FAA13) (FAA14)

RADNAV: Radio Navigation (USCG5)

Rag Top: Open top trailer covered with a tarpaulin. (ATA1)

Rags: Bad tires. (ATA1)

Rail: See also Locomotive, Railway, Railroad, Train.

Rail: A rolled steel shape laid in two parallel lines to form a track for carrying vehicles with flanged steel wheels. (TRB1)

RAIL: Runway Alignment Indicator Lights (FAA4) (FAA17)

Rail Car: (See also Railway Car) A car designed to carry freight or non-passenger personnel by rail, and includes a box car, flat car, gondola car, hopper car, tank car, and occupied caboose. (49CFR171)

Rail Joint Bond: A metallic connection attached to adjoining rails to insure electrical conductivity. (49CFR236)

Rail Mode: (See also Rapid Rail, Rapid Transit Rail, Transit Mode, Transit Railroad, Transit Railway) Consists of freight and passenger (including commuter) railroads. (BTS1)

Rail-Highway Grade Crossing: (See also Grade Crossings; Highway-Rail Crossing) A location where one or more railroad tracks cross a public highway, road, or street or a private roadway, and includes sidewalks and pathways at or associated with the crossing. (49CFR225)

Railbus: A relatively light, diesel-powered, two-axle rail vehicle with a body resembling that of a bus. (TRB1)

Railroad: See also Locomotive, Rail, Railway, Train.

Railroad: A person engaged in transportation by rail. (49CFR171)

Railroad: All forms of non-highway ground transportation that run on rails or electro-magnetic guideways, including; 1) Commuter or other short-haul rail passenger service in a metropolitan or suburban area, and 2) High speed ground transportation systems that connect metropolitan areas, without regard to whether they use new technologies not associated with traditional railroads. Such term does not include rapid transit operations within an urban area that are not connected to the general railroad system of transportation. (49CFR225) (49CFR229) (49CFR245)

Railroad: Any surface transportation system that carries passengers, goods, materials, or property over rails. (FRA3)

Railroad Accident: An event arising from the operation of a railroad which, with minor exceptions results in one or more of the following circumstances 1) Any impact between railroad on-track equipment and an automobile, bus, truck, motorcycle, bicycle, farm vehicle, pedestrian, or other highway user at a highway-rail crossing; 2) Any collision, derailment, fire, explosion, act of God, or other event involving the operation of railroad on-track equipment, standing or moving, which results in more than $6,300 in damages to railroad on-track equipment, signals, track, track structures, and roadbeds; 3) Any event arising from the operation of a railroad which results in the death of one or more persons; an injury to one or more persons (other than railroad employees) requiring medical treatment; 4) An injury to one or more employees which requires medical treatment; or results in restriction of work or motion for one or more days, or one or more lost work days, transfer to another job, termination of employment, loss of consciousness or any occupational illness of a railroad employee as diagnosed by a physician. (FRA1)

Railroad and Railway Electric Service: Electricity supplied to railroads and interurban and street railways, for general railroad use, including the propulsion of cars or locomotives, where such electricity is supplied under separate and distinct rate schedules. (DOE5)

Railroad Car Mile: A single railroad car moved a distance of one mile. (DOE6)

Railroad Crossing Collision: A collision between on-track railroad equipment at a point where tracks intersect. (FRA2)

Railroad Switching and Terminal: A company primarily performing switching service, furnishing terminal trackage, bridges, or other facilities such as union freight stations, operating ferries, or performing any one or combination of these functions. It may coincidentally conduct a regular freight or passenger service. (AAR1)

Railroad Switching and Terminal Establishments: Establishments primarily engaged in the furnishings of terminal facilities for rail passenger or freight traffic for line-haul service, and in the movement of railroad cars between terminal yards, industrial sidings, etc. Terminal companies do not necessarily operate any vehicles themselves, but may operate the stations and terminals. (BOC1)

Railroaded: See Tow.

Railway: See also Locomotive, Rail, Railroad, Train.

Railway: A permanent way having one or more rails which provides a track for trains. (DOI4)

Railway Car: (See also Rail Car) A railway car designed to carry freight, railroad personnel, or passengers. This includes boxcars, covered hopper cars, flatcars, refrigerator cars, gondola cars, hopper cars, tanker cars, cabooses, stock cars, ventilation cars, and special cars. It also includes on-track maintenance equipment. (FRA1)

Railway Gauge: Distance between the rails of a track. (DOI3)

Railway Yard: An area provided with a system of tracks and associated structures, where railway trains are assembled, and railway cars are switched, stored or serviced. (DOI3) (DOI4)

RAIRS: Railroad Accident / Incident Reporting System (BTS7)

Raking Collision: A collision between parts or a consist on an adjacent track, or with a structure such as a bridge. (FRA2)

Ramp: An inclined roadway connecting roads of differing levels. (DOI3)

Ramp Metering: The process of facilitating traffic flow on freeways by regulating the amount of traffic entering the freeway through the use of control devices on entrance ramps. 2) The procedure of equipping a freeway approach ramp with a metering device and traffic signal that allow the vehicles to enter the freeway at a predetermined rate. (TRB1)

Ranking Crew Member: An individual in whom the general charge of the train or yard crew is vested in accordance with the railroad's operating rules. Unless otherwise designated by the railroad, the ranking crew member will be the assigned locomotive engineer. (49CFR218)

RAPCON: Radar Approach Control (FAA19) (FAA14) (FAA13)

Rapid Rail: (See also Rail Mode, Rapid Transit Rail, Transit Mode, Transit Railroad, Transit Railway) A subway-type transit vehicle railway operated on exclusive private rights of way with high level platform stations. Rapid rail also may operate on elevated or at grade level track separated from other traffic. (49CFR37)

Rapid Transit: Rail or motorbus transit service operating completely separate from all modes of transportation on an exclusive right-of-way. (APTA1)

Rapid Transit Rail: (See also Rail Mode, Rapid Rail, Transit Mode, Transit Railroad, Transit Railway) Transit service using rail cars driven by electricity usually drawn from a third rail, configured for passenger traffic and usually operated on exclusive rights-of-way. It generally uses longer trains and has longer station spacing than light rail. (FTA1)

Rapids: An area of broken, fast flowing water in a stream, where the slope of the bed increases (but without a prominent break of slope which might result in a waterfall), or where a gently dipping bar of harder rock outcrops. (DOI4)

RATCF: Radar Air Traffic Control Facilities (FAA14) (FAA13)

Ratchet: A heavy turnbuckle with course-screw threads and midships handle, equipped with pelican hooks on both ends for the purpose of rapidly tightening up wire lashings holding the barges of a tow together. It is widely used on the rivers. (TNDOT1)

Rate-Regulated Pipelines: The pipelines included in these segments are all Federally or state rate-regulated pipeline operations, which are included in the reporting company's consolidated financial statements. However, at the reporting company's option, intrastate pipeline operations may be included in the U.S. Refining/Marketing Segment if: 1) They would comprise less than 5 percent of U.S. Refining/Marketing Segment net property plant & equipment (PP&E), revenues,and earnings in the aggregate; and 2) If the inclusion of such pipelines in the consolidated financial statements adds less than $100 million to the net PP&E reported for the U.S. Refining/Marketing Segment. (DOE5)

Rated Maximum Continuous Augmented Thrust: With respect to turbojet engine type certification, means the approved jet thrust that is developed statically or in flight, in standard atmosphere at a specified altitude, with fluid injection or with the burning of fuel in a separate combustion chamber, within the engine operating limitations established under Part 33 of this chapter, and approved for unrestricted periods of use. (14CFR1)

Rated Maximum Continuous Thrust: With respect to turbojet engine type certification, means the approved jet thrust that is developed statically or in flight, in standard atmosphere at a specified altitude, without fluid injection and without the burning of fuel in a separate combustion chamber, within the engine operating limitations established under Part 33 of this chapter, and approved for unrestricted periods of use. (14CFR1)

Rated Takeoff Augmented Thrust: With respect to turbojet engine type certification, means the approved jet thrust that is developed statically under standard sea level conditions, with fluid injection or with the burning of fuel in a separate combustion chamber, within the engine operating limitations established under Part 33 of this chapter, and limited in use to periods of not over 5 minutes for takeoff operation. (14CFR1)

Rated Takeoff Thrust: With respect to turbojet engine type certification, means the approved jet thrust that is developed statically under standard sea level conditions, without fluid injection and without the burning of fuel in a separate combustion chamber within the engine operating limitations established under Part 33 of this chapter, and limited in use to periods of not over 5 minutes for takeoff operation. (14CFR1)

Rating: A statement that, as a part of a certificate, sets forth special conditions, privileges, or limitations. (14CFR1)

Ratio Estimate: (See also Estimate Ratio, Mean) The ratio of two population aggregates (totals). For example, "average miles traveled per vehicle" is the ratio of total miles driven by all vehicles, over the total number of vehicles. (DOE4)

RBI: Runs Batted In

RBN: Radio Beacon (14CFR1)

RBS: Recreational Boating Safety (USCG5)

RC: Road Reconnaissance (FAA4)

RCAG: Remote Communications Air/Ground Facility (FAA4)

RCC: Regulation Communication Center (RSPA1)

RCC: Rescue Coordination Center (FAA8)

RCE: Radio Control Equipment (FAA19)

RCF: Remote Communication Facility (FAA19)

RCI: Roadway Congestion Index (BTS2)

RCL: Radio Communications Link (FAA19)

RCLS: Runway Centerline Light System (FAA16)

RCO: Remote Communications Outlet (FAA19)

RCR: Runway Condition Reading (FAA4)

RCRA: Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (BTS8)

RDMC: Regional Director of Motor Carriers (FHWA10)

RDSIM: Runway Delay Simulation Model (FAA17)

RDTE: Research Development Test and Evaluation (AIA1)

RDU: Raleigh - Durham International Airport (FAA11)

Reach: A certain area of a river, usually a straight section. (TNDOT1)

Read the Water: To navigate by visual observation of the water surface; not recommended for newcomers. (TNDOT1)

Rear Axle Capacity: The factor and/or Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) recommended maximum load that a rear axle assembly is designed to carry as rated at the ground and expressed in pounds. (GSA2)

Rear End Collision: 1) A collision in which one vehicle collides with the rear of another vehicle. 2) A collision in which the trains or locomotives involved are traveling in the same direction on the same track. 3) A collision of the front of one vehicle with the rear of another vehicle. Also called rear-end. (FRA2) (NHTSA3)

Rear Extremity: The rearmost point on a vehicle when the vehicle's cargo doors, tailgate or other permanent structure are positioned as they normally are when the vehicle is being driven. Non-structural protrusions such as tail lights, hinges, an latches are deleted from the determination of the rearmost point. (49CFR393)

Rear Overhang: Distance from the center of the rear axle to the end of frame. (TII1) (TII2)

Rearrange Tow: To shift barges in tow. (TNDOT1)

Rebuild: (See also Remanufactured Vehicle) A complete repair of a component with the objective of returning it as nearly as possible to its original and/or performance characteristics. (GSA2)

Rebuilt Caboose: A caboose that has undergone overhaul which has been identified by the railroad as a capital expense under Interstate Commerce Commission accounting standards. (49CFR223)

Rebuilt Locomotive: A locomotive that has undergone overhaul which has been identified by the railroad as a capital expense under Interstate Commerce Commission accounting standards. (49CFR223)

Rebuilt Passenger Car: A passenger car that has undergone overhaul which has been identified by the railroad as a capital expense under Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) accounting standards. (49CFR223)

Receiver: A device on a locomotive, so placed that it is in position to be influenced inductively or actuated by an automatic train stop, train control or cab signal roadway element. (49CFR236)

Receiver Coil: Concentric layers of insulated wire wound around the core of a receiver of an automatic train stop, train control or cab signal device on a locomotive. (49CFR236)

Receptacle: A containment vessel for receiving and holding materials, including any means of closing. (49CFR171)

Reception Minimum Altitude: The lowest altitude at which an intersection can be determined. (FAA4)

Reconciling Items: Items where accounting practices vary for handling these expenses as a result of local ordinances and conditions. Reconciling items include depreciation and amortization, interest payments, leases and rentals. They are called reconciling items because they are needed to provide an overall total that is consistent with local published reports. (FTA1)

Recreational Boat: 1) Any vessel manufactured or used primarily for noncommercial use; leased, rented or chartered to another for the latter's noncommercial use; or 2) Engaged in the carrying of six or fewer passengers. (USCG1)

RECS: Residential Energy Consumption Survey (DOE4)

Reduction: Used to indicate the slower output speed resulting from a ratio proportion (faster on reductions of less than 1; 1) single reduction: a single set of reducing gears in the rear axle; 2) double reduction: an additional gear-set in the rear axle to reduce output speed further. May or may not be used as a 2-speed rear axle. (TII1) (TII2)

Reef: A ridge of rocks lying near the surface of the sea, which may be visible at low tide, but is usually covered by water. (DOI3) (DOI4)

Reef Area: An area identified as a danger to maritime navigation containing one or more chains of rocks or coral, at or near the surface of the water. (DOI3)

Reef Pool: Pocket of sea/ocean completely surrounded by a coral reef. (DOI3)

Reefer: Refrigerated truck or trailer designed for hauling perishables. (ATA1)

Reefing Current: Current where the swift water reaches the slack water and creates boils or continues boils or turbulent water. It is considered the edge of the reef or what would be a reef were one there. (TNDOT1)

Refined Petroleum Pipelines: Establishments primarily engaged in the pipeline transportation of refined products of petroleum, such as gasoline and fuel oil. (BOC1)

Refined Petroleum Products: Refined petroleum products include but are not limited to gasolines, kerosene, distillates (including No. 2 fuel oil), liquefied petroleum gas, asphalt, lubricating oils, diesel fuels, and residual fuels. (DOE5)

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