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1-3 Alcohol-Related Fatalities in Motor Vehicle Crashes by Person Type and Crash Type: 2010

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Person type, crash category Total fatalities Alcohol-related fatalities Alcohol-related fatalities as a percentage of total fatalities
Occupants 27,805 11,087 39.9
Single-vehicle crashes 14,567 7,165 49.2
Two-vehicle crashes 11,197 3,313 29.6
More than two-vehicle crashes 2,041 608 29.8
Pedestrians 4,280 2,020 47.2
Single-vehicle crashes 3,682 1,731 47.0
Multiple-vehicle crashes 598 290 48.5
Pedalcyclists 618 209 33.8
Single-vehicle crashes 592 196 33.1
Multiple-vehicle crashes 26 13 50.0
Others/unknown 182 49 26.9
Total 32,885 13,364 40.6


Notes: Category numbers may not sum to totals due to rounding. A motor vehicle crash is considered alcohol-related if at least one driver or nonoccupant (e.g., a pedestrian or pedalcyclist) involved in the crash has a blood alcohol concentration of 0.01 grams per deciliter or greater. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates alcohol involvement when test results of alcohol concentration are unknown.

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) Database, personal communication, December 2011 as cited in U.S. Department of Transportation, Research and Innovative Technology Administration, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, National Transportation Statistics, table 2-20, available at http://www.rita.dot.gov/bts/sites/rita.dot.gov.bts/files/publications/national_transportation_statistics/index.html accessed October 2012.