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42 275 cc Calendar No. 121 105 th Congress Report SENATE 1st Session 105 55 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 1998 July 22, 1997--Ordered to be printed Mr. Shelby, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the following REPORT [To accompany S. 1048] The Committee on Appropriations reports the bill (S. 1048) making appropriations for the Department of Transportation and related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1998, and for other purposes, reports favorably thereon and recommends that the bill do pass. Amounts of new budget (obligational) authority for fiscal year 1998 Amount of bill as reported to Senate $12,610,422,883 Amount of budget estimates, 1998 13,115,727,000 Fiscal year 1997 enacted 11,109,835,396 C O N T E N T S Total obligational authority 4 Salaries and expenses 7 Office of Civil Rights 7 Transportation planning, research, and development 8 Transportation Administrative Service Center 8 Payments to air carriers 9 Rental payments 12 Minority Business Resource Center Program 15 Minority business outreach 15 Operating expenses 21 Acquisition, construction, and improvements 26 Environmental compliance and restoration 32 Port safety development 32 Alteration of bridges 33 Retired pay 33 Reserve training 33 Research, development, test, and evaluation 34 Boat safety 35 Operations 36 Facilities and equipment 44 Research, engineering, and development 65 Grants-in-aid for airports 69 Aircraft Purchase Loan Guarantee Program 83 Limitation on general operating expenses 84 Motor carrier safety operations 85 Highway-related safety grants 90 Federal-aid highways 91 Right-of-way revolving fund 98 Motor carrier safety grants 98 State infrastructure banks 99 Operations and research 101 Highway traffic safety grants 105 Office of the Administrator 108 Railroad safety 110 Railroad research and development 111 Northeast Corridor Improvement Program 114 Railroad Rehabilitation Improvement Program 116 Next generation high-speed rail 116 Alaska railroad rehabilitation 118 Rhode Island rail development 118 Direct loan financing program 119 Grants to National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) 119 Administrative expenses 123 Formula grants 126 University transportation centers 127 Transit planning and research 127 Trust fund share of transit programs 129 Discretionary grants 129 Mass transit capital fund 143 Operations and maintenance 144 Research and special programs 146 Pipeline safety 150 Emergency preparedness grants 152 Salaries and expenses 153 Salaries and expenses 155 Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board: Salaries and expenses 157 National Transportation Safety Board: Salaries and expenses 157 General provisions 160 Compliance with paragraph 7, rule XVI, of the Standing Rules of the Senate 162 Compliance with paragraph 7(c), rule XXVI, of the Standing Rules of the Senate 162 Compliance with paragraph 12, rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of the Senate 163 Budgetary impact statement 164 TOTAL OBLIGATIONAL AUTHORITY PROVIDED--GENERAL FUNDS AND TRUST FUNDS In addition to the appropriation of $12,610,422,883 in new budget authority for fiscal year 1998, large amounts of contract authority are provided by law, the obligation limits for which are contained in the annual appropriations bill. The principal items in this category are the trust funded programs for Federal-aid highways, for mass transit, and for airport development grants. For fiscal year 1998, estimated obligation limitations total $28,081,300,000. PROGRAM, PROJECT, AND ACTIVITY During fiscal year 1998, for the purposes of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (Public Law 99 177), as amended, with respect to appropriations contained in the accompanying bill, the terms ``program, project, and activity'' shall mean any item for which a dollar amount is contained in appropriations acts (including joint resolutions providing continuing appropriations) or accompanying reports of the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations, or accompanying conference reports and joint explanatory statements of the committee of conference. This definition shall apply to all programs for which new budget (obligational) authority is provided, as well as to discretionary grants and discretionary grant allocations made through either bill or report language. In addition, the percentage reductions made pursuant to a sequestration order to funds appropriated for facilities and equipment, Federal Aviation Administration, and for acquisition, construction, and improvements, Coast Guard, shall be applied equally to each budget item that is listed under said accounts in the budget justifications submitted to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations as modified by subsequent appropriations acts and accompanying committee reports, conference reports, or joint explanatory statements of the committee of conference. ISTEA AUTHORIZATIONS EXPIRATION The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act provides authorizations for most Federal highway, transit, and highway safety programs, and most of those authorizations are contract authority. That means they are available for obligation without appropriation. The role of the appropriations process with respect to contract authority programs generally is to set obligation limitations so that overall Federal spending stays within legislated targets and to appropriate liquidating cash to cover the outlays associated with obligations that have been made. ISTEA authorized these Federal surface transportation programs through fiscal year 1997, and the Congress must reauthorize these programs in order to create new contract authority for fiscal year 1998 and later years. The Congress has begun the process to reauthorize ISTEA, but neither the Senate nor the House has passed reauthorization legislation. Until such legislation is enacted, there will not be new contract authority to fund such surface transportation programs as the Federal-aid highway program, transit discretionary grants, or highway safety grants, although any unobligated balances from prior years will carry over and be available for obligation. In developing fiscal year 1998 appropriations legislation for the Federal surface transportation programs authorized by ISTEA, the Committee has generally assumed continuation of current law. If, as the ISTEA reauthorization process moves forward, the Congress decides to make changes to these programs, there may need to be associated changes to the appropriations language for these programs. THE GOVERNMENT PERFORMANCE AND RESULTS ACT The Government Performance and Results Act [Results Act] requires Federal agencies to develop strategic plans and annual performance plans and reports. The first multiyear strategic plan is due by the end of September 1997. The Committee is fully committed to support the Department as it seeks to implement the requirements of the Results Act. The Committee commends the Department for its aggressive implementation of the Results Act. Performance measures have been identified for most of the Department's major programs, and the Department has briefed staff of this Committee and others on these measures. The Department has distributed a draft strategic plan and invited comments from its stakeholders as part of the consultation process required by law. The draft strategic plan represents a commendable effort that builds on the Department's efforts to identify program performance measures and articulates broad goals and objectives for the array of departmental programs. The Committee is disappointed, however, that the draft plan does not set out priorities among those goals and objectives. Setting priorities among such a broad array of goals and objectives is a challenging and controversial task, but the Committee is convinced that a plan with as many goals and objectives as the Department's draft plan that lacks a priority scheme is, in the end, no plan at all. As OMB Director Raines said in a recent discussion of the Results Act, ``This is an era of fiscal limits. Resources are scarce. Not every priority can be met nor all needs satisfied. Every program must count.'' The Committee, therefore, strongly urges the Secretary to consult with this Committee and others in Congress and the Department's stakeholders, before the strategic plan is finalized, to identify priorities among the Department's goals and objectives. If the Secretary and the Congress agree on the Department's priorities, this Committee can work more effectively with the Department in the appropriations process to ensure resources are allocated in a manner best suited to achieving those priorities. As the Department moves forward with implementation of the Results Act, the Committee understands that revisions and realignments to current budgetary presentations will be likely to ensure consistency with strategic and annual performance plans. The Committee strongly encourages the Department to develop and propose such revisions, and to present any necessary reconciliation and crosswalks, to ensure that fiscal year 1999 and subsequent budget submissions display amounts requested against program activity structures for which annual performance goals and indicators have been established. The Committee further expects that the Department will develop any needed revisions to account and program activity structures in consultation with the Committee on Appropriations and cognizant authorizations committees. TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY SALARIES AND EXPENSES Appropriations, 1997 \1\$52,966,000 Budget estimate, 1998 56,136,000 Committee recommendation 66,703,000 \1\Does not include reduction for TASC pursuant to section 321 of Public Law 104 205. Section 3 of the Department of Transportation Act of October 15, 1966 (Public Law 89 670) provides for establishment of the Office of the Secretary of Transportation [OST]. The Office of the Secretary is composed of the Secretary and the Deputy Secretary immediate offices, the Office of the General Counsel, and five assistant secretarial offices for transportation policy, aviation and international affairs, budget and programs, governmental affairs, and administration. These secretarial offices have policy development and central supervisory and coordinating functions related to the overall planning and direction of the Department of Transportation, including staff assistance and general management supervision of the counterpart offices in the operating administrations of the Department. The Committee recommends a total of $66,703,000 for the salaries and expenses of the Office of the Secretary of Transportation including $40,000 for reception and representation expenses. Bill Language User fees .--The Committee has included bill language which permits the Office of the Secretary to credit to this account $1,000,000 in user fees. OFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS Appropriations, 1997 \1\$5,574,000 Budget estimate, 1998 5,574,000 Committee recommendation 5,574,000 \1\Does not include reduction for TASC pursuant to section 321 of Public Law 104 205. The Office of Civil Rights is responsible for advising the Secretary on civil rights and equal employment opportunity matters, formulating civil rights policies and procedures for the operating administrations, investigating claims that small businesses were denied certification or improperly certified as disadvantaged business enterprises, and overseeing the Department's conduct of its civil rights responsibilities and making final determinations on civil rights complaints. In addition, the Civil Rights Office is responsible for enforcing laws and regulations which prohibit discrimination in federally operated and federally assisted transportation programs. The Committee has provided a total of $5,574,000 for the Office of Civil Rights. TRANSPORTATION PLANNING, RESEARCH, AND DEVELOPMENT Appropriations, 1997 \1\$3,000,000 Budget estimate, 1998 6,008,000 Committee recommendation 4,400,000 \1\Does not include reduction for TASC pursuant to section 321 of Public Law 104 205. The Office of the Secretary performs those research activities and studies which can more effectively or appropriately be conducted at the departmental level. This research effort supports the planning, research and development activities, and systems development needed to assist the Secretary in the formulation of national transportation policies. The program is carried out primarily through contracts with other Federal agencies, educational institutions, nonprofit research organizations, and private firms. The Committee has reduced the administration's request by $1,608,000. The recommended level includes $300,000 for reimbursement to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics [BTS] for services provided by the Office of Aviation Information. These funds should be tendered to BTS in the first quarter of the fiscal year to assist BTS in defraying the costs of providing these and other services to OST. Transportation planning .--The recommended level includes funding for transportation planning assistance for the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City and for a multimodal transportation study for Albuquerque and Santa Fe, NM. Safety standards relating to the use of antihistamines .--With funds appropriated during fiscal years 1996 97, the Department is preparing a 1998 public awareness campaign to combat the effect of fatigue, sleep disorders, and inattention related to motor vehicle crashes. In addition to this important effort, the Committee believes that specific attention must be paid to raising awareness of the potential operator impairment caused by various medications. The Federal Aviation Administration has been very vigilant in its review of medication suitable for use by pilots and safety-related personnel and has approved, for example, the use of certain antihistamines for allergy relief that are nonsedating. The Committee believes that other agencies within the Department, such as NHTSA and the Office of Motor Carriers, should follow the lead of the FAA in this regard. Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary to provide by December 31, 1997, a report detailing his plan to develop safety standards relating to the use of antihistamines in all public/commercial modes of transportation. TRANSPORTATION ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICE CENTER Limitation, 1997 \1\($124,812,000) Budget estimate, 1998 ........................... Committee recommendation ........................... \1\Does not reflect reduction pursuant to section 321 of Public Law 104 205. The Transportation Administrative Service Center [TASC] provides a business operation fund for DOT to provide a wide range of administrative services to the Department and other customers. TASC functions as an entrepreneurial and self-sufficient entity and provides competitive quality services responsive to customer needs. The TASC is governed by a Board of Directors composed of customer agencies, operating in a competitive business like environment. The TASC presents proposed operating and financial plans to the Board at the beginning of each fiscal year. Once the Board has approved those plans the TASC provides cost-effective products and services to its full customer base. The Director of TASC provides quarterly performance and financial reports to the Board, makes recommendations for changes to the approved plans and is responsible for the day-to-day management of the TASC. DOT administrations must procure consolidated administrative services from the TASC unless a financial analysis of the services demonstrates that it is more cost beneficial to the Department as a whole--not to an individual operating entity alone--to change the nature of the service delivery (to consolidate a service or to decentralize a service). TASC services are being marketed to customers outside DOT to provide greater economies of scale, thus reducing costs to individual customers. TASC services include: --Functions formerly in DOT's working capital fund [WCF]; --Office of the Secretary [OST] personnel, procurement and information technology support operations; --Systems development staff; --Operations of the consolidated departmental dockets facilities; and --Certain departmental services and administrative operations, such as human resources management programs, transit fare subsidy payments, and employee wellness including substance awareness and testing. All of the services of the TASC will be financed through customer reimbursements, to the extent possible, on a fee-for-service basis. The Committee is directing the Office of the Inspector General to undertake a study and report back to the Committee by April 1, 1998, that evaluates the cost effectiveness of TASC and whether the TASC provides quality services responsive to customer needs. PAYMENTS TO AIR CARRIERS (liquidation of contract authorization) (airport and airway trust fund) Appropriations, 1997 ($25,900,000) Budget estimate, 1998 ........................... Committee recommendation ........................... In fiscal year 1998, this account is being terminated, and remaining contract authority is being rescinded. The Essential Air Service Program is being funded in a new account (essential air service and rural airport improvement fund), reflecting provisions of the Federal Aviation Reauthorization Act of 1996. Many EAS points are located in remote rural areas: 57 of 69 communities served by the Essential Air Service Program are more than 100 highway miles from the nearest small, medium, or large hub airport. Twenty-six more communities are located in Alaska, where, in all but two cases, year-round road access does not exist. Recognizing the critical importance of EAS service to these communities, the Committee intends that service in Alaska not be reduced. Without air service, such communities would be further isolated from the Nation's economic centers. Moreover, businesses are typically interested in locating in areas that have convenient access to scheduled air service. Loss of service would seriously hamper small communities' ability to attract new business or even to retain those they now have, resulting in further strain on local economies and loss of jobs. ESSENTIAL AIR SERVICE AND RURAL AIRPORT IMPROVEMENT FUND Appropriations, 1997 ........................... Budget estimate, 1998 (mandatory authority) $50,000,000 Committee recommendation (mandatory authority) 50,000,000 The Essential Air Service [EAS] and Rural Airport Improvement Program provides funds directly to commuter/regional airlines to provide air service to small communities that otherwise would not receive air service and for rural airport improvement as provided by the 1996 Federal Aviation Reauthorization Act. The Federal Aviation Reauthorization Act of 1996 authorizes $100,000,000 in user fees for flights that fly over, but do not land in, the United States. The first $50,000,000 of each year's fees go directly to carry out the Essential Air Service Program and, to the extent not used for essential air service, to improve rural airport safety. The Committee recommendation includes a general provision which would limit the number of communities that receive EAS funding by excluding points in the 48 contiguous United States that are located fewer than 70 highway miles from the nearest large or medium hub airport, or that require a subsidy in excess of $200 per passenger unless such a point is more than 210 miles from the nearest large or medium hub airport. The following table reflects the points currently receiving service and the annual rates as of the end of March 1997: RECENT EAS SUBSIDY DATA\1\ States/communities Estimated mileage to nearest hub (small, medium, or large) Average daily enplanements at EAS point (calendar year 1996) Current annual subsidy rates (June 1, 1997) Subsidy per passenger Arizona: 101 5.8 $155,369 $51.26 Arkansas: 108 7.0 569,344 112.48 California: 234 25.1 151,450 11.58 Colorado: 258 36.4 210,544 31.34 Hawaii: Kamuela 39 3.1 292,061 180.84 Illinois: 126 5.7 182,319 61.62 Iowa: Ottumwa 85 4.0 382,072 181.16 Kansas: 149 10.1 146,225 27.70 Maine: 71 12.0 330,080 52.57 Michigan: 236 21.2 141,363 37.26 Minnesota: 127 (\3\) (\3\) (\3\) Missouri: 138 13.1 108,120 24.02 Montana: 280 6.7 387,540 110.25 Nebraska: 256 2.2 346,863 296.21 Nevada: Ely 237 2.9 508,759 335.37 New Hampshire: Keene 56 5.6 382,283 131.82 New Mexico: 91 12.9 188,923 27.99 New York: 118 9.0 132,540 28.12 North Dakota: 405 15.0 415,506 53.10 Oklahoma: 84 6.0 381,517 121.15 Pennsylvania: Oil City/Franklin 86 25.5 118,373 8.89 South Dakota: 206 (\3\) (\3\) (\3\) Texas: Brownwood 138 4.2 499,109 226.56 Utah: 178 21.8 292,882 25.70 Vermont: Rutland 69 11.9 382,283 61.51 Washington: Ephrata/Moses Lake 108 38.7 177,628 8.78 West Virginia: 173 8.6 270,835 60.36 Wyoming: Worland 164 9.6 155,468 31.01 \1\The above list of communities is based on currently available data, and is subject to change for a number of reasons. Subsidy rates change as their 2-year rate terms expire throughout the year. In addition, air carriers submit passenger traffic data on a quarterly basis. Changes in both subsidy rates and traffic levels will, of course, change subsidy-per-passenger calculations. Further, some communities currently receiving subsidy-free service may require subsidy in the future while some currently subsidized communities may attain profitability and no longer require subsidy. Finally, hub designations are recalculated annually and published by the FAA in the ``Airport Activities Statistics.'' \2\There was an extended service hiatus; thus, no meaningful calculation can be made. \3\No service or subsidy rate in place. PAYMENTS TO AIR CARRIERS (rescission of contract authorization) (airport and airway trust fund) Rescission, 1997 -$12,700,000 Budget estimate, 1998 -38,600,000 Committee recommendation -38,600,000 The Committee has included bill language which would continue the current eligibility criteria for essential air service. In addition, the Department is encouraged to explore establishing dual EAS hubs in Kansas within the eligibility criteria and available funding. RENTAL PAYMENTS Appropriations, 1997 $127,447,000 Budget estimate, 1998 10,567,000 Committee recommendation ........................... In 1996 and 1997 payments to the General Services Administration [GSA] for headquarters and field space rental and related services for all operating administrations were consolidated into this account. Beginning in 1998, the administration proposes that all GSA rental payments be included in the modal budgets. Therefore, the budget request includes funding only for OST utilized space and related services and departmentwide facility security enhancements. The administration believes that decentralized budgeting for rent will encourage the operating administrations to reduce excess space. The Committee includes funding for rent, but has included the funding in the Office of the Secretary salaries and expenses. GSA RENTAL PAYMENTS\1\ [Dollars and square feet in thousands] Administration Fiscal year 1996 enacted\2\ Fiscal year 1996 GSA billings Fiscal year 1997 projected\3\ Fiscal year 1998 request Funding Square feet Funding Square feet Funding Square feet Federal Highway Administration [17,685] [17,112] [18,005] [1,070] 18,275 1,067 National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 4,381 4,386 217 4,234 217 Federal Railroad Administration 3,493 4,955 212 2,955 156 Federal Transit Administration 3,237 3,304 152 3,239 153 Federal Aviation Administration 69,431 68,309 4,160 67,024 4,213 U.S. Coast Guard 40,334 36,237 2,363 34,815 2,364 St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation 193 196 9 150 9 Research and Special Programs Administration 2,022 2,077 103 2,075 103 Office of the Inspector General 2,225 2,386 110 2,350 110 Office of the Secretary of Transportation: 12,885 6,381 291 5,898 291 Transportation Administrative Services Center 6,526 321 6,640 321 Bureau of Transportation Statistics 452 587 26 575 26 OST--rental payments to GSA [135,200] [138,653] [135,344] [7,964] ----------- ---------------- ----------- ------------------ --------- ------------- ------- Subtotal 135,200 138,653 135,344 7,964 152,899 9,030 Federal Highway Administration 17,685 17,112 18,005 1,070 ----------- ---------------- ----------- ------------------ --------- ------------- ------- Subtotal, consolidated account 152,885 8,580 155,765 153,349 9,034 Maritime Administration 4,594 298 4,433 4,465 299 4,684 299 ----------- ---------------- ----------- ------------------ --------- ------------- ------- Total, Department of Transportation 157,479 8,878 160,198 157,814 9,333 157,583 9,329 \1\Enacted as a single account under the Office of the Secretary of Transportation. Fiscal years 1996 and 1997 appropriations directed the reimbursement of FHWA GSA rent from FHWA LGOE account to the consolidated account. The fiscal year 1998 budget proposes the termination of the consolidated rent account and the return of funding for space utilized by the operating administrations to their respective budgets \2\Fiscal year 1996 requirements are best represented by the actual billings. There is no distribution by mode of the enacted amounts of $152,885 and 8,580 square feet because they are less than our existing inventory. The shortfall of $3,500,000 for the consolidated account was covered by GSA. \3\Fiscal year 1997 requirements are best represented by the projected billings. There is no distribution by mode of the enacted amounts of $144,741 and 8,580 square feet because they are less than our existing inventory. MINORITY BUSINESS RESOURCE CENTER PROGRAM Appropriations, 1997 $1,900,000 Budget estimate, 1998 1,900,000 Committee recommendation 1,900,000 Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization [OSDBU]/Minority Business Resource Center [MBRC]. --The OSDBU/MBRC provides assistance in obtaining short-term working capital and bonding for disadvantaged, minority, and women-owned businesses [DBE/MBE/WBE's]. In fiscal year 1998, the short-term loan program will focus on the lending of working capital to DBE/MBE/WBE's for transportation-related projects in order to strengthen their competitive and productive capabilities. Since fiscal year 1993, the loan program has been a separate line item appropriation, which reflects the President's budget proposal, which segregated such activities in response to changes made by the Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990. The limitation on direct loans under the Minority Business Resource Center is at the administration's requested level of $15,000,000. The Department is projecting that the authorized loan level of $15,000,000 will be reached in fiscal years 1998 and 1999. Of the funds appropriated, $1,500,000 covers the direct subsidy costs for loans not to exceed $15,000,000; and, $400,000 is for administrative expenses to carry out the Direct Loan Program. MINORITY BUSINESS OUTREACH Appropriations, 1997 $2,900,000 Budget estimate, 1998 2,900,000 Committee recommendation 2,900,000 This appropriation provides contractual support to assist minority business firms, entrepreneurs, and venture groups in securing contracts and subcontracts arising out of projects that involve Federal spending. It also provides support to historically black and Hispanic colleges. Separate funding is requested by the administration since this program provides grants and contract assistance that serves DOT-wide goals and not just OST purposes. General Provisions Political and Presidential appointees .--The Committee has included a provision in the bill (sec. 305), which is similar to general provisions that have been included in previous appropriations acts, which limits the number of political and Presidential appointees within the Department of Transportation. The Committee is recommending that the ceiling for fiscal year 1998 be 107 personnel. Advisory committees .--The Committee has included a general provision (sec. 323) which would limit the amount of funds that could be used for the expenses of advisory committees utilized by the Department of Transportation. The limitation specified is $1,000,000, which is $250,000 below that enacted in fiscal year 1997. Minority business outreach program .--The bill includes a provision in the bill (sec. 337) that would allow the repurchase of preferred stock at a rate determined by the Secretary to facilitate the administration of the Minority Business Resource Center Program and to make more funds available for the underlying purposes of the program. Other Reductions in fiscal year 1997 appropriations .--In fiscal year 1997, reductions were made to a number of accounts due to limitations or reductions imposed in various areas, such as the Transportation Administration Services Center, performance awards, and rescissions required by the Omnibus Consolidated Appropriations Act of 1997 (Public Law 104 208). In the Senate Committee report, each account head shows the amount appropriated in Public Law 104 205 and Public Law 104 208, before the various reductions were made. The table below depicts the amount of funds appropriated for each of the accounts, and the reductions required. CHANGES IN FISCAL YEAR 1997 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION APPROPRIATIONS Account Public Law 104 205 Public Law 104 208 Net appropriation Appropriations TASC GP 321 Awards GP 346 Appropriations Rescissions Office of the Secretary: $52,966,000 -$1,458,200 $51,507,800 ---------------- -------------- --------------- ---------------- ---------------- --------------- Subtotal -1,553,804 ================ ============== =============== ================ ================ =============== U.S. Coast Guard: 2,294,725,000 -2,026,805 -$3,000 2,292,695,195 ---------------- -------------- --------------- ---------------- ---------------- --------------- Subtotal -2,026,805 -3,000 ================ ============== =============== ================ ================ =============== Federal Aviation Administration: 4,900,000,000 -2,811,301 -176,888 $57,900,000 4,954,911,811 ---------------- -------------- --------------- ---------------- ---------------- --------------- Subtotal -2,811,301 -176,888 226,600,000 ================ ============== =============== ================ ================ =============== Federal Highway Administration: (20,000,000) ( -9,100,000) (10,900,000) ---------------- -------------- --------------- ---------------- ---------------- --------------- Subtotal -2,001,532 -178,512 82,000,000 ================ ============== =============== ================ ================ =============== National Highway Traffic Safety Administration: (171,000,000) ( -11,800,000) (159,200,000) ---------------- -------------- --------------- ---------------- ---------------- --------------- Subtotal -597,812 -32,000 ================ ============== =============== ================ ================ =============== Federal Railroad Administration: 16,739,000 -103,000 -4,000 16,632,000 ---------------- -------------- --------------- ---------------- ---------------- --------------- Subtotal -170,979 -15,000 141,180,000 ================ ============== =============== ================ ================ =============== Federal Transit Administration: Administrative expenses 41,497,000 -451,135 -4 41,045,861 ================ ============== =============== ================ ================ =============== St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation: Operations and maintenance 10,337,000 -12,704 -2,000 10,322,296 ================ ============== =============== ================ ================ =============== Research and Special Programs Administration: 26,886,000 -179,100 -3,900 3,000,000 29,703,000 ---------------- -------------- --------------- ---------------- ---------------- --------------- Subtotal -279,842 -5,200 3,000,000 ================ ============== =============== ================ ================ =============== Office of Inspector General: Salaries and expenses 37,900,000 -94,086 -1,000 37,804,914 ================ ============== =============== ================ ================ =============== Bureau of Transportation Statistics\1\ (25,000,000) ( -118,094) ( -36,860) 24,845,046 ================ ============== =============== ================ ================ =============== Surface Transportation Board: Salaries and expenses 12,344,000 -100,000 12,244,000 ================ ============== =============== ================ ================ =============== Total reductions, Department of Transportation -10,000,000 -513,604 452,780,000 \1\BTS reductions in parentheses included under Federal-aid highways. Asset sales .--The Coast Guard and FAA, like many other agencies, are reorganizing and downsizing while providing critical services to the public at less cost. The Committee believes that the Coast Guard, the FAA, the FHWA, and the Government as a whole, would benefit substantially if allowed budgetary credit for property they expect to excess as part of downsizing efforts. Clearly, there is the potential for a very positive benefit if the Coast Guard and the FAA are permitted to receive credit for the value of excessed property. Rebates, refunds, and incentive payments .--The Department receives funds from various Government programs at different time intervals (that is, weekly, monthly, quarterly). For example, under the General Services Administration's Travel Management Center [TMC] Program, rebate checks received from the travel contractor are distributed monthly to each element of the Department in proportion to net domestic airline sales arranged by the contractor. Past expenditures have to be analyzed to determine the proper sources to refund which can be a time-consuming process. The staff time and cost associated with the precise accounting for each such refund is prohibitive. To alleviate the need to specifically identify the source for each repayment the language allows a fair and sensible allocation of the rebates and miscellaneous and other funds. Many repayments are received late in the fourth quarter of the fiscal year or in the first quarter of the new fiscal year and thus are not effectively available to the agency for new obligations. For example, rebate checks for September travel are received from the travel management contractor in October. To maintain good financial management incentives and avoid injudicious commitments, this provision would provide specific authority to use rebated funds for program purposes beyond the fiscal year of the appropriation charged for the initial payment. U.S. COAST GUARD SUMMARY OF FISCAL YEAR 1998 PROGRAM The U.S. Coast Guard, as it is known today, was established on January 28, 1915, through the merger of the Revenue Cutter Service and the Lifesaving Service. In 1939, the U.S. Lighthouse Service was transferred to the Coast Guard, followed by the Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation in 1942. The Coast Guard has as its primary responsibilities the enforcement of all applicable Federal laws on the high seas and waters subject to the jurisdiction of the United States; promotion of safety of life and property at sea; assistance to navigation; protection of the marine environment; and maintenance of a state of readiness to function as a specialized service in the Navy in time of war (14 U.S.C. 1, 2). The Committee recommends a total program level of $3,964,731,000 for the activities of the Coast Guard in fiscal year 1998. The following table summarizes the Committee's recommendations: [In thousands of dollars] Program Fiscal year 1997 enacted\1\ Fiscal year 1998 estimate Committee recommendations Operating expenses \2\2,619,725 \3\2,740,000 \2\2,731,700 Acquisition, construction, and improvements 374,840 \4\379,000 \4\412,300 Environmental compliance and restoration 22,000 21,000 21,000 Port safety development 5,000 Alteration of bridges 16,000 26,000 Retired pay 617,284 645,696 653,196 Reserve training 65,890 65,000 65,535 Research, development, test, and evaluation 19,200 19,000 20,000 Boat safety 35,000 55,000 35,000 ----------------------------- --------------------------- --------------------------- Total 3,774,939 3,924,696 3,964,731 \1\Excludes reductions pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. \2\Includes $300,000,000 in Department of Defense Appropriations Act. \3\Includes $300,000,000 from defense discretionary funds. \4\Excludes $9,000,000 in proposed asset sales. OPERATING EXPENSES General Trust Total Appropriations, 1997\1\ $2,594,725,000 $25,000,000 $2,619,725,000 Budget estimate, 1998\2\ 2,715,000,000 25,000,000 2,740,000,000 Committee recommendation\3\ 2,706,700,000 25,000,000 2,731,700,000 \1\Includes $300,000,000 by transfer from the Department of Defense. Excludes reductions for TASC and awards pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. \2\Includes $300,000,000 from defense discretionary funds. \3\Includes $300,000,000 by transfer from the Department of Defense. The ``Operating expenses'' appropriation provides funds for the operation and maintenance of multipurpose vessels, aircraft, and shore units strategically located along the coasts and inland waterways of the United States and in selected areas overseas. The program activities of this appropriation fall into the following categories: Search and rescue. --One of its earliest and most traditional missions, the Coast Guard maintains a nationwide system of boats, aircraft, cutters, and rescue coordination centers on 24-hour alert. Aids to navigation. --To help mariners determine their location and avoid accidents, the Coast Guard maintains a network of manned and unmanned aids to navigation along our coasts and on our inland waterways, and operates radio stations in the United States and abroad to serve the needs of the armed services and marine and air commerce. Marine safety. --The Coast Guard insures compliance with Federal statutes and regulations designed to improve safety in the merchant marine industry and operates a recreational boating safety program. Marine environmental protection. --The primary objectives of this program are to minimize the dangers of marine pollution and to assure the safety of U.S. ports and waterways. Enforcement of laws and treaties. --The Coast Guard is the principal maritime enforcement agency with regard to Federal laws on the navigable waters of the United States and the high seas, including fisheries, drug smuggling, illegal immigration, and hijacking of vessels. Ice operations. --In the Arctic and Antarctic, Coast Guard icebreakers escort supply ships, support research activities and Department of Defense operations, survey uncharted waters, and collect scientific data. The Coast Guard also assists commercial vessels through ice-covered waters. Defense readiness. --During peacetime the Coast Guard maintains an effective state of military preparedness to operate as a service in the Navy in time of war or national emergency at the direction of the President. As such the Coast Guard has primary responsibility for the security of ports, waterways, and navigable waters up to 200 miles offshore. COMMITTEE FUNDING RECOMMENDATION The Committee recommendation for Coast Guard operating expenses is $2,731,700,000, including $25,000,000 from the oilspill liability trust fund and $300,000,000 from the Defense appropriations bill for national security missions. [In thousands of dollars] Fiscal year 1997 enacted\1\ Budget request Committee recommendation Pay and allowances: 1,221,311 1,252,440 1,252,440 ----------------------------- ---------------- -------------------------- Total, pay and allowances 1,591,249 1,635,898 1,635,898 ============================= ================ ========================== Depot level maintenance: 144,276 154,659 154,659 ----------------------------- ---------------- -------------------------- Total, depot level maintenance 375,305 395,990 395,990 ============================= ================ ========================== Operations and support: Area operations and support: Cutters: Medium endurance (WMEC) 17,803 18,939 18,939 High endurance (WHEC) 11,529 11,944 11,944 Polar WAGB's 2,380 2,858 2,858 Area offices 18,062 18,400 18,400 Maintenance and logistics commands 136,137 130,469 122,169 Communication stations 2,236 2,335 2,335 District operations and support: District offices 46,898 47,395 47,395 Groups/bases 67,196 69,112 69,112 Combined group/air station 9,928 10,281 10,281 Air stations 45,373 49,820 49,820 Marine safety offices 9,926 10,104 10,104 Long-range electronic navaids (Loran) 6,283 6,362 6,362 Cutters-WLB's and smaller; Mackinaw 31,761 34,504 34,504 Vessel traffic service [VTS] systems 241 244 244 ----------------------------- ---------------- -------------------------- Total, operations and support 408,365 415,406 407,106 ============================= ================ ========================== Recruiting and training support: 6,767 7,313 7,313 ----------------------------- ---------------- -------------------------- Total, recruiting and training support 67,733 76,275 76,275 ============================= ================ ========================== Coast Guard-wide centralized services and support: Headquarters-managed units: Engineering Logistics Center 8,052 8,157 8,157 Finance center 4,786 4,843 4,843 Human Resources Service and Information Center 1,371 1,391 1,391 Coast Guard yard 2,771 2,846 2,846 National Strike Force 2,099 2,114 2,114 National Pollution Funds Center 1,080 1,118 1,118 Command and Control Engineering Center [C\2\CEN] 2,584 3,522 3,522 Air station Washington, DC 773 871 871 Operations Systems Center [OSC] 7,200 7,229 7,229 Telecommunications/information systems command [TISCOM] 4,116 4,138 4,138 Navigation Center [NAVCENT] 1,896 1,899 1,899 Intelligence Coordination Center [ICC] 189 1,458 1,458 Electronics Engineering Center [EECEN] 2,304 346 346 Coast Guard Institute 968 979 979 Research and Development Center 243 246 246 Coast Guard Personnel Center 957 970 970 National Maritime Center 3,246 3,287 3,287 Centralized bill paying: Postal 6,297 6,431 6,431 FTS 11,544 12,344 12,344 Federal employment compensation 6,486 6,452 6,452 Unemployment compensation 5,250 4,639 4,639 GSA rent 35,748 35,748 ----------------------------- ---------------- -------------------------- Total, Coast Guard-wide centralized services and support 175,043 216,431 216,431 ============================= ================ ========================== Total, accountwide adjustments ================ ========================== ============================= Total appropriation 2,617,695 2,740,000 2,731,700 \1\Includes reduction of $2,030,000 for TASC and awards pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. Note.--Fiscal year 1997 enacted and fiscal year 1998 request includes $300,000,000 provided by transfer from the Department of Defense. PAY AND ALLOWANCES Medical care and equipment .--The Committee has provided the full amount requested for medical care and equipment. The Committee feels that the Coast Guard has done a good job to keep its medical care and equipment line item under budget. OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT Area operations and support Maintenance and logistics commands .--The Committee has provided the amount requested for the maintenance and logistics commands less the caretaker fund requested for Governor's Island. The Committee encourages the Coast Guard to auction the Governor's Island property as quickly as possible. The sale of the Governor's Island facility was anticipated in the budget agreement and the Committee has provided bill language that relieves the Coast Guard from the responsibility for maintaining the property in caretaker status. RECRUITING AND TRAINING SUPPORT The recruiting and training support category has several subsets, including recruiting, training centers (Yorktown, VA; Petaluma, CA; and Cape May, NJ), the Coast Guard Academy, and professional training and education. The Committee has provided $76,275,000 consistent with the budget request. The Committee believes that the Coast Guard has done a good job in trying to hold costs down, and though its budget for professional training and education is sizable, further cuts are not necessary at this time and would undermine the Coast Guard's efforts to recruit and train to meet personnel needs in a streamlined Coast Guard. CENTRALIZED SERVICES AND SUPPORT The centralized services and support line item includes a number of individual activities. The Committee has provided $216,431,000 overall for centralized services and support. The recommendation provides a $41,388,000 increase over the fiscal year 1997 level for this subactivity. BILL LANGUAGE National security .--The Committee's recommendation includes $300,000,000 transferred from the Department of Defense for Coast Guard support of national security activities. The Coast Guard plays a key role in support of military missions under the U.S. Atlantic and Southern Commands in support of drug interdiction missions, refugee and immigration support, and enforcement and joint military training. The Coast Guard is a cost-effective force which is multimissioned. Its ships, aircraft, shore units, and people have four primary roles: maritime safety, maritime law enforcement, marine environmental protection, and national defense. These roles are complementary and contribute to the Coast Guard's unique niche within the national security community. The value of the Coast Guard forces and their mission experience was clearly evident by their active participation in Operations Desert Shield/Storm in the Persian Gulf, and more recently, in operations restore/uphold democracy in Haiti. The Coast Guard is one of the five Armed Forces, and is a full partner on the joint national security team. To be a credible partner, the Coast Guard must maintain a high state of operational readiness. Many parts of the Coast Guard's budget contain funding requests that, if cut, would severely impair the Coast Guard's operational readiness and, therefore, its ability to meet national security commitments. GENERAL PROVISIONS Vessel traffic safety fairway, Santa Barbara/San Francisco .--The Committee has included a general provision (sec. 313) that would prohibit funds to plan, finalize, or implement regulations establishing a vessel traffic safety fairway which is less than 5 miles wide between the Santa Barbara vessel traffic separation scheme and the San Francisco vessel traffic separation scheme. This language has been included in previous appropriations bills. Regulations regarding animal fats and vegetable oils .--The Committee has retained a general provision (sec. 335) that prohibits Coast Guard from using funds to issue, implement, or enforce a regulation that fails to provide for the differences between animal fats, vegetable oils, and other oils. OTHER Mackinaw .--The bill includes the $4,865,000 in requested funding for continued operation and maintenance of the icebreaking cutter Mackinaw during fiscal year 1998. The Committee discourages the administration from pursuing proposals to charge user fees for icebreaking services. Marine Fire and Safety Association .--The Committee remains supportive of efforts by the Marine Fire and Safety Association [MFSA] to provide specialized fire fighting training and maintain an oilspill response contingency plan for the Columbia River. The Committee encourages the Secretary to provide funding for MFSA consistent with the authorization and directs the Secretary to provide $146,500 to continue efforts by the MFSA to provide specialized communications, fire fighting training and equipment, and to implement the oilspill response contingency plan for the Columbia River. Defense readiness .--The Committee has provided the requested $34,300,000 increase in resources for the war on drugs. It should be left to the Commandant's discretion how the drug interdiction funding is to be distributed; however, the Committee believes that this area is perfectly suited for application of performance measures and evaluation of program impacts. Civilian staffing .--The Coast Guard recently provided the Committee with a report analyzing its current personnel management structure to determine whether greater use of civilians would be of benefit to the agency. The report concludes that a military member costs more than a civilian filling the same position; the cost differential representing the premium paid for frontline, rapid-response capability in an operational environment. In the aftermath of completing a major streamlining initiative, the Coast Guard must now conduct military position essentiality review. The report outlines the criteria to be used in such a review, including: deployment, command and control, operations, military skills, jurisdiction of the Uniform Code of Military Justice, statutory requirements, organizational structure, and unusual work hours. The Committee is very interested in the ongoing process of the essentiality review and the results flowing from that effort. The Coast Guard is to be commended for the openness of the report and the Committee encourages the Coast Guard to pursue the essentiality review with the same openness. ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS General Trust Total Appropriations, 1997 $354,840,000 $20,000,000 $374,840,000 Budget estimate, 1998 359,000,000 20,000,000 379,000,000 Committee recommendation 392,300,000 20,000,000 412,300,000 This appropriation provides for the major acquisition, construction, and improvement of vessels, aircraft, shore units, and aids to navigation operated and maintained by the Coast Guard. Currently, the Coast Guard has in operation approximately 250 cutters, ranging in size from 65-foot tugs to 399-foot polar icebreakers, more than 2,000 boats, and an inventory of more than 200 helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft. The Coast Guard also operates approximately 600 stations, support and supply centers, communications facilities, and other shore units. The Coast Guard provides over 48,000 navigational aids--buoys, fixed aids, lighthouses, and radio navigational stations. COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION The following table summarizes the Committee's programmatic recommendations: [In thousands of dollars] Fiscal year 1997 enacted Fiscal year 1998 estimate Committee recommendation Vessels 216,500 186,900 214,700 Aircraft 18,040 26,400 26,400 Other equipment 41,700 49,700 51,200 Shore facilities and aids to navigation 52,350 69,000 73,000 Personnel and related support 46,250 47,000 47,000 -------------------------- --------------------------- -------------------------- Total 374,840 \1\379,000 \1\412,300 \1\Includes $9,000,000 in proposed asset sales. VESSELS The Committee recommends $214,700,000 for vessel acquisition and improvement. The projected allocation of these funds is shown in the table below: VESSELS [In thousands of dollars] Fiscal year 1998 estimate Committee recommendation Acquire vessels and equipment: 55,000 41,000 Repair, renovate, or improve existing vessels and small boats: 3,800 3,800 --------------------------- -------------------------- Total (new program level) 186,900 214,700 The Committee recommends a funding level of $214,700,000 for vessels procurement. This is an increase of $27,800,000 over the budget request. This level of funding is necessary to begin to relieve the out-year pressure on the ACI account due to anticipated replacement of the deepwater fleet. By increasing the procurement of current production vessels, the Coast Guard will realize per unit savings and will create out-year room for anticipated new procurements. In addition, the increased procurement of vessels will provide the Coast Guard with additional flexibility in positioning assets as the Coast Guard moves to a more modern generation of vessels. This flexibility will enable the Coast Guard to better meet its multimission challenges and better deploy a streamlined force. Seagoing buoy tender [WLB] replacement .--The Coast Guard plans to replace its 50-year-old fleet of seagoing buoy tenders with up to 16 new tenders. The request of $55,000,000 for fiscal year 1998 is to pay for the award of the second ship under the full production contract, and to cover additional costs such as spare parts, logistics, and project administration. According to recent estimates, the contract for the first two production ships will be awarded in the second quarter of fiscal year 1998. The Committee is concerned about the growing carryover balances in this program. Last year, the Committee restored much of the House reductions in this account pursuant to the belief that the Coast Guard would be able to obligate a substantial portion of the requested funds. That has not happened. Accordingly, the Committee recommends a reduction of $14,000,000 in the request which can be made up by the $46,564,000 unobligated balance. This program continues to concern the Committee due to the increasing program administration costs, the vacillating sail-away costs, and the current unobligated balance. The Coast Guard estimates the first vessel in the class to have cost $49,400,000, and the second vessel in the class to have cost $29,800,000. Assuming these estimates are accurate, the funds provided are adequate to award a contract in the second quarter of fiscal year 1998 for two vessels if the lower cost is accurate or if the first two vessels under the production contract have similar cost profiles of the first two vessels in the class. Coastal buoy tender [WLM] replacement .--The Committee has provided $21,000,000 for the coastal buoy tender replacement program. This program replaces the Coast Guard's existing 133-foot and 157-foot coastal buoy tenders with 14 new ships. The Coast Guard's request of $21,000,000 for fiscal year 1998 is for economic price adjustments change orders, logistics, and administration. All 14 ships have been ordered. Based on recent information on the 1998 spending plans, it appears that the Coast Guard should have virtually no unobligated carryovers that could be used in fiscal year 1998 against this request. Coastal patrol boat/82-foot WPB replacement .--The Committee has provided $68,100,000 for the coastal patrol boat replacement program, which is a $30,800,000 increase to the amount requested for fiscal year 1998. This program would replace the 82-foot coastal patrol boats which are over 30 years old with 31 new boats. The request for fiscal year 1998 was to procure eight new boats. The Committee recommendation is to procure an additional seven CPB's by exercising existing options which will provide the Coast Guard increased flexibility in asset deployment at an earlier date than under the current procurement schedule. The CPB is one of the more versatile vessels in the Coast Guard inventory and should provide increased flexibility and capability as the Coast Guard transitions from the current fleet mix and recapitalizes the fleet. Stern loading buoy boat replacement project .--The Committee recommendation provides the entire Coast Guard request of $12,000,000 in fiscal year 1998 to procure eight new buoy boats. Mackinaw replacement .--The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for concept exploration to refine the specifications and costs for a heavy icebreaking replacement vessel, including a new multimission vessel, for the 53-year-old Mackinaw . While the Committee is pleased that the Commandant has committed to the continued operation of the Mackinaw to maintain heavy icebreaking capabilities on the Great Lakes, the Committee is concerned about the long lead time projected by the Coast Guard to receive a replacement vehicle when the Coast Guard has been studying this issue for a number of years, and projects that a replacement vehicle would not be available until the year 2006. The funding provided in the bill will prevent another year's delay in the acquisition process for a replacement heavy icebreaking vessel. The Committee expects the Coast Guard to issue an interim status report on the concept exploration to the Committee by May 1, 1998. Polar class icebreaker reliability improvement project [RIP] .--The Committee recommends a reduction of $4,000,000 in this program in order that the Coast Guard can effectively manage the reliability improvement project for polar class icebreakers. ATS 1 conversion .--The Committee recommends $13,000,000 for conversion and the addition of a flight deck. AIRCRAFT For aircraft procurement, the Committee recommends $26,400,000 consistent with the budget request. Funds for aircraft acquisitions are distributed as follows: AIRCRAFT [In thousands of dollars] Fiscal year 1998 estimate Committee recommendation Traffic alert and collision avoidance system [TCAS] 3,300 3,300 Global positioning system installation--phase VII, IX 1,900 1,900 HC 130 engine conversion 5,200 5,200 HH 65A helicopter kapton rewiring 3,200 3,200 Long range search aircraft capability preservation 4,600 4,600 HH 65A helicopter mission computer unit replacement 4,400 4,400 HC 130 aircraft sensor upgrade 3,800 3,800 --------------------------- -------------------------- Total 26,400 26,400 OTHER EQUIPMENT The Committee recommends $51,200,000. The following table displays the project allocation: OTHER EQUIPMENT [In thousands of dollars] Fiscal year 1998 estimate Committee recommendation Fleet logistics system [FLS] 9,200 9,200 Ports and waterways safety system [PAWSS] 5,500 5,500 Port security equipment 3,500 Marine information for safety and law enforcement [MISLE] 4,000 4,000 Local notices to mariners [LNM] automation 1,800 1,800 Frequency spectrum reallocation 5,100 5,100 Conversion of software applications 2,000 2,000 Defense message system [DMS] impementation 1,400 1,400 Communication system [COMMSYS] 2000 1,000 1,000 Differential global positioning system [DGPS] (coastal gaps) phase II 1,000 1,000 Personnel management information system/joint uniform military pay system II 1,600 1,600 Aviation logistics management information system [ALMIS] 2,700 2,700 National distress system modernization 7,000 5,000 VHF FM high level site upgrade--phase III 7,400 7,400 --------------------------- -------------------------- Total 49,700 51,200 Ports and waterways safety system [PAWSS] .--The Committee recommends $5,500,000 for the development and implementation of a new ports and waterways safety system [PAWSS], as requested by the administration. The Committee continues to be interested in Coast Guard activities to develop a new approach to navigation safety, with an emphasis on streamlining and reducing the cost of such safety systems. The Committee applauds the Coast Guard's efforts to develop such a system in cooperation with the maritime community and to apply information technology. Personnel management information system .--The Committee has provided the full amount requested. National distress system modernization .--The Committee recommends a reduction of $2,000,000 to $5,000,000. The Committee believes the Coast Guard can complete the activities anticipated for fiscal year 1998 in this program within the reduced funding level. SHORE FACILITIES AND AIDS TO NAVIGATION The program level recommended is $73,000,000. SHORE FACILITIES AND AIDS TO NAVIGATION [In thousands of dollars] Fiscal year 1998 estimate Committee recommendation Shore--General: 6,000 6,000 Groups/bases/stations/MSO's: 4,000 4,000 Aids to navigation facilities: Waterways aids-to-navigation projects 5,000 5,000 OMEGA termination cost 6,700 6,700 Coast Guard District 1--construct Bayonne pier 4,100 4,100 Integrated support command--Portsmount, VA: 4,700 4,700 Asset sales (9,000) (9,000) --------------------------- -------------------------- Total 69,000 73,000 Air Stations Brooklyn and Cape May. --The Committee understands that the Coast Guard has proposed to consolidate Air Station Brooklyn and Air Station Cape May due to improved operational capabilities of its assets which result in budgetary savings. However, the Committee remains concerned about maintaining critically important Coast Guard air rescue response time in the New York City areas at the level currently provided by Air Station Brooklyn during the peak boating season. Therefore, the Committee encourages the Coast Guard to establish and operate a seasonal air facility in the New York City area to provide helicopter rescue capability during the period April 15 through October 15. Kodiak electricity cogeneration .--The Committee encourages the Coast Guard to explore innovative means of assisting the local electrical cooperative from which it purchases power in upgrading its power production capability. PERSONNEL AND RELATED SUPPORT The program level recommended is $47,000,000. Within the amount provided, $500,000 shall be for core acquisition costs. The Committee has provided the full amount requested for AC&I personnel and related support. [In thousands of dollars] Personnel and related support Fiscal year 1998 estimate Committee recommendation Direct personnel costs 46,500 46,500 Core acquisition costs 500 500 --------------------------- -------------------------- Total 47,000 47,000 BILL LANGUAGE Asset sales .--The bill includes a provision which would credit the proceeds from the sale or lease of surplus Coast Guard real property to this appropriation. The administration requested this authority which allows asset sale revenues to be credited to this appropriation as offsetting collections, but limits the amount of offsetting collections in fiscal year 1998 to $9,000,000. Any excess proceeds from asset sales would accrue to the following fiscal year. Accordingly, the Committee encourages the Coast Guard to explore the auction or sale of the Governor's Island facility during fiscal year 1998 with an eye toward supplmenting fiscal year 1999 appropriations. In addition, the bill includes language that protects the Coast Guard from liability for the cost of maintaining Governor's Island. The Coast Guard's closure of Governors Island provides and example of the cost savings attainable by streamlining the agency's infrastructure and the potential significant revenue available to the Coast Guard and the rest of the Federal Government by selling nonessential or noncritical, high-value assets. The Committee would also like to know about additional properties of high value in the Coast Guard's real property portfolio; therefore, the Coast Guard is directed to submit to the Committee by April 2, 1998, a list of its 25 most valuable properties. This list should include information on the fair market value of each property (or an estimate thereof), the amount of land and the number of buildings, the current use being made of the property, and the annual operating costs for the activities housed on each property. The Coast Guard needs funding it can depend upon to carry out necessary projects. The Senate supports the authority vested in the Commandant which allows the sale of real property and specified operational assets, with proceeds to be credited to the ``Acquisition, construction, and improvements'' appropriation. Pier space use agreement .--The bill includes language that allows the Secretary of Transportation, acting through the Commandant of the Coast Guard, to enter into a long-term use agreement with the city of Unalaska for dedicated pier space on the municipal dock. This authority is necessary to support Coast Guard vessels when such vessels call on the Port of Dutch Harbor, AK. The terms and conditions of the use agreement shall be develop by the Secretary and the city of Unalaska. New York search and rescue capability .--The Committee directs the Department of Defense to provide facilities including runway; hangar; fire crash and rescue; and support spaces at the Air National Guard site at the Francis S. Gabreski Airport, Hampton, Long Island, NY, to the Coast Guard. This facility will provide seasonal search and rescue capability during the period April 15 through October 15. Support spaces will consist of suitable operations, berthing, and maintenance spaces. General provisions .--The Committee has included a general provision directing the transfer of the U.S.N.S. Edenton to the Coast Guard. ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE AND RESTORATION Appropriations, 1997 $22,000,000 Budget estimate, 1998 21,000,000 Committee recommendation 21,000,000 The Committee recommends funding of $21,000,000 to continue the environmental restoration and compliance-related actions throughout the Coast Guard. These fiscal year 1998 funds will be used to address environmental problems at former and current Coast Guard units as required by applicable Federal, State, and local environmental laws and regulations. Planned expenditures for these funds include major upgrades to petroleum and regulated-substance storage tanks, restoration of contaminated ground water and soils, remediation efforts at hazardous substance disposal sites, and initial site surveys and actions necessary to bring Coast Guard shore facilities and vessels into compliance with environmental laws and regulations. ISC Kodiak remediation funding .--The investigation and potential cleanup of 34 sites on ISC Kodiak, as per the 1990 Resources Conservation Recovery Act consent order, goes well. Eight of these sites have been closed and eight other sites have been approved for no further action status. Due to reduced levels of contamination anticipated, lower than expected costs to meet consent order milestones, and successful ongoing milestone negotiations with the regulatory bodies, annual requirements for this project have been reduced from past levels of $4,400,000 to $5,400,000 to about $3,000,000 to $3,500,000. Given overall budget constraints and other demands placed on the ``Environmental compliance and restoration'' appropriation, these levels will be adequate to continue this remediation effort in fiscal year 1998. PORT SAFETY DEVELOPMENT Appropriations, 1997 $5,000,000 Budget estimate, 1998 ........................... Committee recommendation ........................... This appropriation provided funds in 1996 and 1997 for the reduction of debt incurred by the Port of Portland, OR, from prior infrastructure development. No funds are requested for 1998. ALTERATION OF BRIDGES Appropriations, 1997 $16,000,000 Budget estimate, 1998 ........................... Committee recommendation 26,000,000 The ``Alteration of bridges'' appropriation provides funds for the Coast Guard's share of the cost of altering or removing bridges obstructive to navigation. Under the provisions of the Truman-Hobbs Act of June 21, 1940, as amended (33 U.S.C. 511 et seq.), the Coast Guard, as the Federal Government's agent, is required to share with owners the cost of altering railroad and publicly owned highway bridges which obstruct the free movement of navigation on navigable waters of the United States in accordance with the formula established in 33 U.S.C. 516. The Committee directs that, of the funds provided, $5,000,000 shall be allocated to the Sand Island Road Tunnel in Honolulu, HI, $3,000,000 shall be allocated to the Florida Avenue railroad/highway combination bridge in New Orleans, LA, and $18,000,000 shall be allocated to the Sidney Lanier highway bridge in Brunswick, GA. RETIRED PAY Appropriations, 1997 $617,284,000 Budget estimate, 1998 645,696,000 Committee recommendation 653,196,000 The ``Retired pay'' appropriation provides for retired pay of military personnel of the Coast Guard and Coast Guard Reserve, members of the former Lighthouse Service, and for annuities payable to beneficiaries of retired military personnel under the retired serviceman's family protection plan (10 U.S.C. 1431 1446) and survivor benefit plan (10 U.S.C. 1447 1455), and for medical care of retired personnel and their dependents under the Dependents Medical Care Act. The average number of personnel on the retired rolls is estimated to be 31,279 in fiscal year 1998, as compared with an estimated 30,433 in fiscal year 1997 and 29,650 in fiscal year 1996. The bill includes $653,196,000 for retired pay, consistent with the budget request, adjusted by $6,100,000 to annualize fiscal year 1997 supplemental funding. This is scored as a mandatory appropriation in the congressional budget process. In addition, this funding level includes $1,400,000 in anticipation of congressional action to extend partial veteran benefits to Merchant Mariners who served between August 16, 1945, and December 31, 1946. The Committee recommends the additional funds for the Coast Guard to process up to 50,000 applications in fiscal year 1998. RESERVE TRAINING Appropriations, 1997 $65,890,000 Budget estimate, 1998 65,000,000 Committee recommendation 65,535,000 Under the provisions of 14 U.S.C. 145, the Secretary of Transportation is required to adequately support the development and training of a Reserve force to ensure that the Coast Guard will be sufficiently organized, manned, and equipped to fully perform its wartime missions. The purpose of the Reserve training program is to provide trained units and qualified persons for active duty in the Coast Guard in time of war or national emergency, or at such other times as the national security requires. Coast Guard reservists must also train for mobilization assignments that are unique to the Coast Guard in times of war, such as port security operations associated with the Coast Guard's Maritime Defense Zone [MDZ] mission and include deployable port security units. The Committee has provided $65,535,000 for Reserve training. The amount provided is $535,000 above the President's request. The Coast Guard is provided Reserve training funding as follows: [In thousands of dollars] Functional program element Fiscal year 1997 levels President's request (7,600 SELRES) Committee recommendation (8,000 SELRES) Drill pay and benefits 26,763 26,203 26,763 Full-time support personnel 20,904 21,013 21,013 Annual training program 11,665 11,467 11,467 District administration/training 2,315 2,250 2,250 Recruiting 2,051 2,066 2,066 O/M support to training facilities 1,532 1,316 1,316 Headquarters administration 660 685 660 ------------------------- ------------------------------------ ----------------------------------------- Total 65,890 65,000 65,535 RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION General Trust Total Appropriations, 1997 $14,180,000 $5,020,000 $19,200,000 Budget estimate, 1998 15,500,000 3,500,000 19,000,000 Committee recommendation 16,500,000 3,500,000 20,000,000 The Coast Guard's Research and Development Program seeks to improve the tools and techniques with which Coast Guard carries out its varied operational missions and to increase the knowledge base upon which it depends to fulfill its regulatory responsibilities. The bill includes $20,000,000 for research, development, test, and evaluation, which is $1,000,000 above the budget request. The Committee recommendation for funding distribution is as follows: [In thousands of dollars] Fiscal year 1997 Fiscal year 1998 estimate Committee recommendation Program areas: 1,872 1,875 1,875 ------------------ --------------------------- -------------------------- Total 19,200 19,000 20,000 The Committee has made a slight adjustment to the fiscal year 1998 request for research and development. In the marine environmental protection area, the Committee has provided the amount requested for the aquatic nuisance species program, which is $1,529,000 and increased the funding for this activity by $1,000,000 to further research effects into a nonchemical interim ballast management practice for fully loaded vessels to prevent the ballast-mediated transfer of species. This research should focus in particular on vessels reporting no ballast on board [NOBOB]. In addition, this funding is also intended to assist the Coast Guard's other efforts consistent with the National Invasive Species Act. BOAT SAFETY (aquatic resources trust fund) Appropriations, 1997 $35,000,00006 Budget estimate, 1998\1\ (55,000,000) Committee recommendation 35,000,00006 \1\The President's budget proposed, contingent on enactment of legislation, that $55,000,000 be available as a direct (mandatory) program and no discretionary funds. This account provides financial assistance for a coordinated National Recreational Boating Safety Program for the several States. Title 46, United States Code, section 13106, establishes a ``Boat safety'' account from which the Secretary may allocate and distribute matching funds to assist in the development, administration, and financing of qualifying State programs. The ``Boat safety'' account consists of amounts transferred from the highway trust fund which are derived from the motorboat fuel tax (18.4 cents per gallon). The President's budget requests no discretionary funding in 1998. Instead, the President's budget proposes to provide all funding for the State boating safety grant program by providing $35,000,000 from the aquatic resources trust fund, together with $20,000,000 from the 7E``Sport fish restoration'' account as authorized under the Clean Vessel Act of 1992 (title V of the Oceans Act of 1992). The Committee cannot support the administration's proposal to convert this program to mandatory spending. After highway fatalities, recreational boating accidents result in the highest number of transportation fatalities annually. The number of boats is increasing each year and the National Transportation Safety Board continues to list boating safety as one of the areas most in need of safety improvement. Annual congressional review and guidance is necessary for timely implementation of boating safety initiatives. FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION SUMMARY OF FISCAL YEAR 1998 PROGRAM The Federal Aviation Administration traces its origins to the Air Commerce Act of 1926, but more recently to the Federal Aviation Act of 1958 which established the independent Federal Aviation Agency from functions which had resided in the Airways Modernization Board, the Civil Aeronautics Administration, and parts of the Civil Aeronautics Board. FAA became an administration of the Department of Transportation on April 1, 1967, pursuant to the Department of Transportation Act (October 15, 1966). The total recommended program level for the FAA for fiscal year 1998 amounts to $9,179,154,883 including $50,000,000 in user fees credited to the ``Operations'' appropriation and a $1,700,000,000 obligation limitation on the use of contract authority for the Airport Grants Program. The following table summarizes the Committee's recommendations: [In thousands of dollars] Program Fiscal year 1997 enacted Fiscal year 1998 budget estimate Committee recommendation Operations \1\4,957,900 5,086,100 5,375,900 User fees: \2\(75,000) -50,000 -50,000 Facilities and equipment 1,937,700 1,875,000 1,889,005 Research, engineering, and development 208,412 200,000 214,250 Grants-in-aid for airports\4\ 1,460,000 1,000,000 1,700,000 National Civil Aviation Review Commission 2,400 -------------------------- ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Total 8,491,412 8,411,100 9,129,155 \1\Excludes reductions for TASC and awards pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. \2\Reflects maximum amount provided in Public Law 104 205. FAA estimates collections of only $20,000,000 in fiscal year 1997. \3\Proposed user fees. \4\Limitation on obligations. OPERATIONS General Trust User fees Total Appropriations, 1997 $3,182,500,000 $1,700,400,000 $75,000,000 $4,957,900,000 Budget estimate, 1998 1,611,100,000 3,425,000,000 350,000,000 5,386,100,000 Committee recommendation 3,424,272,000 1,901,628,000 50,000,000 5,375,900,000 FAA's ``Operations'' appropriation provides funds for the operation, maintenance, communications, and logistic support of the air traffic control and navigation systems and activities. It also covers the administration and management of the regulatory, airports, commercial space, medical and engineering, and development programs. User fees. --The administration proposed collecting $400,000,000 in user fees in fiscal year 1998. Of these fees, $100,000,000 is available without Appropriations Committee action, including $50,000,000 for the essential air service program and rural airport safety and $50,000,000 for FAA expenses. The bill includes a total of $5,325,900,000 for the operations activities of the Federal Aviation Administration, of which $1,901,628,000 shall be derived from the airport and airway trust fund. An additional $50,000,000 for FAA operations will be derived from user fees. As in past years, FAA is directed to report immediately to the Committees on Appropriations in the event resources are insufficient to operate a safe and effective air traffic control system. The activities of the operations accounts comprise eight main areas consistent with FAA's reorganization to bring together functions and activities that support the provision of a single, major service and to establish a single executive responsible for that service. Air traffic services. --The operations and maintenance of the national air traffic control and navigation system and the installation of air traffic and navigation equipment. Air traffic services consists of five subactivities: air traffic, NAS logistics, systems maintenance, leased telecommunications, and flight inspections. Aviation regulation and certifications.-- Promotes aviation safety and ensures compliance with safety and certification standards for air carriers, commercial operators, air agencies, airmen, and civil aircraft, including aircraft registration; develops and administers safety standards for airworthiness of aircraft and components. Includes accident investigation, aviation medicine, aviation rulemaking, and the suspected unapproved parts office. Civil aviation security .--Provides for the overall planning, direction, management, evaluation, and enforcement of civil aviation security; supports efforts covering the investigation and interdiction of illegal drugs and the assessment of foreign airports. Research and acquisition.-- Responsible for all research, prototyping, system development, and acquisition activities. Includes the William J. Hughes Technical Center. Administration of airports. --Provides for the administration of airport grants and the safety inspection and certification of the Nation's airports. Commercial space transportation. --Facilitates and promotes commercial space launches by the U.S. private sector and licenses and regulates commercial launches, launch site operations, and certain payloads. Administration. --Funds the administrative functions that establish policy and direct and develop programs in the areas of FAA aircraft use and management, building space management, budget and accounting, business information and consultation, human resource management, and technical and management training; includes the regional administrators and the Aeronautical Center Director. Staff offices. --Funds the Office of the Administrator and the Deputy Administrator, and offices that report directly to the Administrator and provide executive direction; operations and communications control; civil rights; government and industry affairs; policy, planning, and international aviation; legal counsel; and public affairs. The following table summarizes the Committee's recommendation in comparison to the budget estimate: [In thousands of dollars] Fiscal year 1997 program level\1\ Fiscal year 1998 budget estimate Committee recommendations Air traffic services 3,801,353 4,192,516 4,181,916 Aviation regulation and certification 501,921 613,768 614,168 Aviation security 114,360 98,651 98,651 Research and acquisition 85,767 92,858 92,858 Administration of airports 45,051 48,052 48,052 Commercial space transportation 6,040 6,182 6,182 Administration 330,044 262,143 262,143 Staff offices 70,376 71,930 71,930 Accountwide adjustments ---------------------------------- --------------------------- ----------------------------------- Total 4,954,912 5,386,100 5,375,900 =================================== ================================== =========================== User fees 350,000 50,000 Appropriated funds 5,036,100 5,325,900 ----------------------------------- ---------------------------------- --------------------------- Total available funds 5,386,100 5,375,900 \1\Includes reduction for TASC and awards pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. AIR TRAFFIC SERVICES The Committee recommends a total of $4,181,916,000 for the operation and maintenance of the national air traffic control and flight service system. This is $10,600,000 less than the budget estimate, but $380,563,000 above the fiscal year 1997 level. Over the next decade, the Committee expects to see the billions of dollars of new technology being developed, procured, and implemented under the ``Facilities and equipment'' account--computers, communications equipment, and information analysis capability--reflected in a projected trend toward more productive work forces and, therefore, lower operations budget estimates. The major activities include: Air traffic. --The Committee recommends $2,536,258,000 and 24,581 FTE's. The Committee's recommendation provides a net increase of 500 additional air traffic controllers as request by the administration. -- Equipment and staffing deficiencies in the New York/New Jersey region .--The Committee continues to be concerned with the shortage of adequately trained air traffic controllers as well as persistent problems with air traffic control equipment at the FAA's air traffic facilities in the New York/New Jersey metropolitan area. These staffing shortages and equipment outages have resulted in increased delays and inefficiencies that have placed an inordinate amount of pressure on the overtaxed FAA work force, the air carriers serving the region, as well as the flying public. The Subcommittee on Transportation held a special hearing on this topic on June 12, 1997, during which testimony was received from Members of Congress as well as representatives of the FAA, air carriers, the air traffic controllers, and technicians unions. The hearing served to highlight the urgent need for the FAA to expedite staffing of its facilities in the New York/New Jersey area so that they meet or exceed authorized staffing levels. It also highlighted the failure of the FAA to fully utilize all the tools at its disposal, including the tools granted under its personnel reform authorities, to alleviate critical staffing shortages at these facilities as expeditiously as possible. Finally, the hearing highlighted the need for the FAA to expedite the installation of upgraded and new air traffic control equipment in order to expedite the replacement of outdated equipment and assist the air traffic controllers and air carriers serving the region in handling growing volumes of air traffic, especially during inclement weather. The Committee is pleased with the FAA's progress over the past year in increasing the staffing levels at area towers, the New York TRACON and the New York center. However, the Committee directs the Administrator to meet the authorized staffing levels for all facilities in the New York/New Jersey region by the dates identified in the pending agreements with the pertinent employee organizations. The Administrator is further directed to inform the Committee immediately if it appears that those deadlines will not be met. The Committee further requests the Administrator to use all tools at his or her disposal to rectify the ongoing problems highlighted during the special hearing held by the Transportation Subcommittee. -- Contract tower program .--The Committee recommends $43,700,000 for the contract tower program, as requested by the administration, and directs FAA to study traffic at the airports in New Bern and Hickory, NC, and at the Salisbury/Wicomico County Regional Airport in Maryland, and, if those airports meet or are projected to meet FAA's benefit/cost criteria for tower operations within the next 2 years or if tower operation could be justified under a cost-sharing arrangement, directs FAA to open contract towers at those airports for service during fiscal year 1998. The Committee is aware that FAA has notified 22 airports around the Nation that the FAA will withdraw funding for towers at those airports in 2 years unless the benefit/cost ratio at those airports exceeds 1.0 by the end of 1998. The Committee is concerned about the impacts loss of tower service would have at these 22 airports and will monitor developments with respect to these airports. The Committee urges FAA to work with the communities to explore alternatives, such as sharing of the tower operating costs, to maintain tower operations if the benefit/ cost criteria are unlikely to be satisfied at any of these airports by the end of 1998. National airspace system logistics support. --The Committee recommends $180,833,000 for this subactivity including 1,188 FTE's. The funding provided for the national airspace system logistics support activity is the full amount requested by the administration for fiscal year 1998. Maintenance of air traffic control system. --The Committee recommends $1,064,545 and 9,505 FTE's for this budget subactivity, as requested by the administration. For the reasons discussed below, the Committee has concluded that FAA is likely to continue to underutilize its radio communications link [RCL] network in favor of leased telecommunications. The Committee suggests that FAA accommodate the $4,000,000 reduction by disposing of a part of its underutilized RCL network and taking staffing savings. Leased telecommunication services. --The Committee recommends $343,339,000 for this budget subactivity. This is a reduction of $4,000,000 from the request level. FAA's leased telecommunications request for fiscal year 1998 ($347,339,000) represents a $17,077,000 increase over the fiscal year 1997 level. In the report accompanying last year's appropriation bill, the Committee expressed concern about underutilization of the radio communications link [RCL], which is owned by FAA and is one of the largest microwave networks in the country. The alternative to increased use of the RCL is increased reliance on leased telecommunications costs for the use of private networks. The Committee directed FAA to transfer to the radio communications link as much of the existing workload as possible to better utilize that resource. The Committee understands that FAA plans to use an additional 2,300 to 2,900 RCL circuits rather than leasing circuits from a private vendor. Even if FAA adopts this plan, it would still only be utilizing 56 to 61 percent of its analog circuits and still have a significant amount of digital capacity sitting idle. Given that FAA will apparently continue to underutilize the RCL and prefers leased telecommunications links, the Committee is recommending a reduction of $4,000,000 from the request for the systems maintenance subactivity. Satellite communications technology .--The Committee has added $400,000 to the air traffic activity to provide a low-earth orbit [LEO] satellite communication system at Anchorage, AK, to augment present communications systems. Extensive areas of Alaska are not within present radio coverage. The LEO system will be available for widespread use in Alaska within 2 years, and the Committee anticipates that pilots with the appropriate onboard equipment will be able to use this new capability to call FAA's flight service stations from such locations within the State. Flight inspection. --The Committee recommends $63,942,000 and 579 FTE's for this activity which is the full amount requested. Accountwide adjustment .--Based upon a GAO analysis of the request of $51,200,000 for 82 NAS Plan Hand-Off projects that identified 14 percent in excess costs (associated, for example, with project requirements that had been canceled since the budget estimates were developed), the Committee believes $7,000,000 can be reduced from air traffic services with no impact on FAA's ability to field new equipment. AVIATION REGULATION AND CERTIFICATION The Committee recommends $614,168,000 and 5,882 FTE's for this activity. Funding provided for aviation regulation and certification is an increase of $112,247,000 over fiscal year 1997 and $400,000 over the administration's request. The Committee fully funds the requested employment increases for administrative support ( +68), airworthiness inspectors ( +117), airline operations inspectors ( +118), certification engineers and pilots ( +17), and manufacturing certification inspectors ( +6). The Committee has included an additional $400,000 to continue the human intervention and motivation study [HIMS], a comprehensive education and training program for alcohol and drug abuse prevention in the airline industry with emphasis on peer identification and intervention. Since its inception in 1974, HIMS has been a very successful program to deal with the problem of alcoholism in the air transportation workplace and to enhance the safety of air travel. Lack of funding now threatens to stifle the program at a time when the need for it is great, especially in the regional airline industry. CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY The Committee recommends $98,651,000 and 1,109 FTE's for this budget activity. The Committee has fully funded the civil aviation security program. RESEARCH AND ACQUISITION The Committee recommends $92,858,000 and 809 FTE's for this budget activity as requested by the administration. This is an 8-percent increase over the fiscal year 1997 enacted level. ADMINISTRATION OF AIRPORTS The Committee recommends $48,052,000 and 495 FTE's for this activity, the same as the administration's request. COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION The Committee recommends $6,182,000 and 34 FTE's for this activity. The Committee's recommendation for the Commercial Space Transportation Office is the same as the administration's request. ADMINISTRATION The Committee recommends $262,143,000 and 1,987 FTE's for this budget activity. The Committee has fully funded the administration's request for fiscal year 1998 in the administration activity level. STAFF OFFICES The Committee recommends $71,930,000 and 591 FTE's for this budget activity, the same as the requested amount. BILL LANGUAGE Second career training program .--The Committee has included bill language which was included in the President's budget request which prohibits the use of appropriated funds for the second career training program. This prohibition has been carried in annual appropriations acts for many years. Sunday premium pay .--The bill retains a provision, first included in the fiscal year 1995 appropriations bill, which prohibits FAA from paying Sunday premium pay, except in those cases where the individual actually worked on a Sunday. This provision is identical to that which was in effect for fiscal years 1995, 1996, and 1997. It was requested by the administration for fiscal year 1998. Manned auxiliary flight service stations .--The Committee has retained bill language which was requested by the administration to prohibit the use of funds for operating a manned auxiliary flight service station in the contiguous United States. There is no funding provided in the ``Operations'' account for such stations in fiscal year 1998. Commercial space transportation .--The Committee has retained language which prohibits the use of any funds from the airport and airway trust fund for the support of the operations and activities of the Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation. This prohibition was requested by the administration. OTHER GPS nonprecision approaches .--The Committee urges FAA to establish a global positioning system [GPS] nonprecision instrument approach at Atka, AK, along with appropriate weather, communications, and lighting equipment. The Committee also urges the FAA to seriously consider developing, in conjunction with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, Bureau of Aviation, 200 helicopter-only GPS approach systems to support emergency air medical services in Pennsylvania. User fees .--The administration's request included $300,000,000 in new aviation user fees to be appropriated for operations. The Committee does not recommend such an approach. Instead, the Committee recommends an appropriation of $5,325,900,000, which will be supplemented by $50,000,000 in user fees that were authorized last year and should be available for operations expenses in fiscal year 1998. Last year the Committee approved an administration request for $75,000,000 in new user fees in order to offset a portion of FAA operations costs. In approving these new user fees the Committee made clear this was on a trial basis only and further noted that expansion of the user fee concept in future years would depend upon whether a consultative process had been developed in concert with specific fee schedules. At this point, that standard has not been met. Based on the FAA's first attempt to craft such a rule (the foreign overflight fee), which has resulted in concerns being raised in Congress, the U.S. Department of State, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, it is apparent to the Committee that Congress should be very wary of providing the FAA with such authority in the future. House and Senate committees have made clear to FAA that, for safety reasons, Congress did not intend to authorize foreign overflight fees on general aviation when it granted FAA authority to establish overflight fees. In addition, the Committee believes general aviation operations should be exempted from the rule since the administrative cost of including such operations likely would exceed the anticipated fees from general aviation sources. To date, FAA has failed to follow the direction of Congress in this matter. The Committee also believes Canada-to-Canada and Mexico-to-Mexico overflights should be exempted, provided those two countries do not impose similar charges on flights operated by United States citizens. The Committee is concerned that, absent such an exemption, Mexico and Canada will be forced to impose similar overflight fees on United States airlines that presently are not charged for such services. A fee which invites retaliation by a foreign government is nothing more than a hidden tax on the American people. Further, such fees may have the perverse effect of influencing airlines' choice of airspace or takeoff and landing preferences which may have a deleterious impact on safety. In addition, since there are more American domestic operations that transit foreign airspace, the financial impact on United States airlines will be greater than that on foreign airlines, so the Committee also questions the FAA's interim final rule approach from a national interest vantage. The Committee is concerned that the FAA's interim final rule fails to comply with international law and bilateral aviation obligations of the United States. The Committee understands the U.S. Department of State has received diplomatic correspondence from many countries expressing concern that the FAA, inconsistent with our international commitments, failed to provide meaningful advance consultation. Specifically, these governments assert that the cost allocation materials made available in support of the interim final rule were insufficient to permit an accurate review or analysis of the reasonableness of the overflight charges and that FAA failed to adequately respond to questions raised about the rule. The Committee expects that the FAA will be responsive to U.S. Department of State's entreaties that FAA address the concerns of the international community. To date the rule has been formally objected to by Canada, the United Kingdom, Hong Kong, and Austria. In addition, a combined diplomatic note was presented to the Department of State by the Embassies of Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the Commission of the European Union. These concerns are currently the subject of pending litigation in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. The Committee rejects the FAA's contention to the international community that the United States' obligation to provide prior consultations can be fully met by giving affected parties an opportunity to comment after a rule has gone into effect. We expect foreign countries to engage in meaningful prior consultations with U.S. airlines before they impose any fees and, accordingly, expect nothing less from the FAA with respect to affected foreign parties. The Committee does not share FAA's cavalier attitude about complying with the United States' international law and bilateral aviation obligations. The Committee is disappointed that, to this point, FAA has failed to develop an adequate consultative process and, based on FAA's performance in establishing foreign overflight fees, is skeptical of FAA's ability to administer a more comprehensive user fee system. FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT (Airport and Airway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1997 $1,937,700,000 Budget estimate, 1998 1,875,000,000 Committee recommendation 1,889,004,883 Under the ``Facilities and equipment'' appropriation, safety, capacity and efficiency of the Federal airway system are improved by the procurement and installation of new equipment and the construction and modernization of facilities to keep pace with aeronautical activity and in accordance with the Federal Aviation Administration's comprehensive capital investment plan [CIP], formerly called the national airspace system [NAS] plan. CIP MILESTONES FOR MAJOR SYSTEM ACQUISITIONS System name Year of first-site implementation Year of last-site implementation 1983 NAS plan 1991 CIP 1993 CIP 1996 CIP 1997 CIP 1983 NAS plan 1991 CIP 1993 CIP 1996 CIP 1997 CIP Advanced automation system [AAS] 1990 1991 1991 (\1\) (\1\) 1994 2001 2004 (\1\) (\1\) Air route surveillance radar [ARSR 4] 1988 1993 1994 1996 1996 1991 1996 1996 1997 (\6\) Airport surface detection equipment [ASDE 3] 1987 1992 1993 1993 1993 1990 1994 1996 1999 1999 Automated weather observing system [AWOS] 1986 1989 1989 1989 1989 1990 1997 1997 2000 2001 Central weather processor [CWP] 1990 1991 1991 1991 1991 1991 1998 \7\1992 \7\1993 \7\1993 Flight service automation system [FSAS] 1984 1991 1991 1991 1991 1989 1995 1994 1995 1995 Mode S 1988 1993 1994 1994 1994 1993 1996 1996 1998 1999 Radio microwave link [RML] replacement and expansion 1985 1986 1986 1986 1986 1989 1994 1993 1993 1993 Terminal doppler weather radar [TDWR] (\8\) 1993 1994 1994 1994 (\8\) 1996 1996 (\9\) (\9\) Voice switching and control system [VSCS] 1989 1995 1995 1995 1995 1992 1997 1997 1997 1997 \1\The AAS Program has been restructured into three areas: En route [DSR], terminal [STARS], and tower [TAP]. \2\STARS schedule was being rebaselined in keeping with new acquisition strategy. \3\TCCC schedule was being rebaselined to reflect the incorporation of surface management advisor [SMA]. \4\TCCC has been replaced by the Tower Automaton Program [TAP]. \5\The Tower Automation Program [TAP] schedule is currently under review. \6\ARSR 4 last-site implementation date has not been determined due to environmental issues at Ajo, AZ. \7\Dates denoted are for MWP I only. The CWP RWP segment has been eliminated as a continuation of the CWP Program, and has been merged with MWP II into the Weather and Radar Processor [WARP] Program. \8\The TDWR was not included in the 1983 NAS plan. \9\TDWR last-site implementation indefinite due to site availability and land acquisition problems. Source: FAA 1983 NAS plan, 1991, 1993, 1995 CIP, 1997 GAO ``Status of the FAA's Modernization Program.'' REASONS FOR DELAY AND COST INCREASES IN CIP PROJECTS System name Reasons for delay Advanced automation system [AAS] In general, AAS delays were due to an overly ambitious plan, inadequate FAA oversight of the contractor, and ineffective resolution of requirements issues. The AAS Program has been restructured into three areas: En route, terminal, and tower. Air route surveillance radar [ARSR 4] Problems with the radar's development and site preparation delayed first-site implementation. Testing took longer than originally expected. Delays have also occurred due to changes in system design, interface problems with other ATC systems, and slips in site construction. The last-site implementation change in the 1997 CIP is due to the environmental assessment having to be reaccomplished at Ajo, AZ. Airport surface detection equipment [ASDE 3] Original delays occurred because FAA and the contractor underestimated software complexity. FAA changed some requirements, and testing uncovered some performance problems. Software development, establishing remote towers, site selection/preparation, and the addition of seven systems have delayed the program. Automated weather observing system [AWOS] Site prep, installation, and maintenance problems, as well as delays in receiving Government-furnished equipment contributed to original delays. Last-site implementation delay occurred because of communications funding shortfalls and installation delays of the communications infrastructure to deliver weather information. The last-site implementation change in the 1997 CIP is due to the addition of ASOS systems per fiscal year 1997 congressional direction. Central weather processor [CWP] Early software development problems and software discrepancies during testing delayed the system in early stages. The program was descoped to just the CWP-MWP I segment, which is now fully implemented. Flight service automation system [FSAS] Original delays occurred because of software development and testing problems with the Model I system. Program implementation is complete. Mode S Problems in developing hardware and software during initial phases delayed the system, and software problems caused a delay in first-site implementation. Implementation of the last site has been moved due to en route interface requirements. The last-site implementation change in the 1997 CIP is due to site preparation delays. Radar microwave link [RML] replacement and expansion In the early stages, site acquisition and prep problems delayed the system. Other delays occurred because of a change in the prime contractor and due to problems encountered during operational test and evaluation. Program implementation is complete. Terminal doppler weather radar [TDWR] Site availability and land acquisition problems have delayed last-site implementation. Last-site implementation remains indefinite. TDWR has experienced schedule delays because of site availability and land acquisition problems. Voice switching and control system [VSCS] Early delays were due to the two prototype contractors having technical difficulties in meeting FAA's requirements for system reliability. Additional delays occurred because of software development and integration problems during the upgrade of the prototype to a production model. The implementation schedule has not changed since the 1991 CIP. The last-site implementation was achieved on schedule in February 1997. The bill includes an appropriation of $1,889,004,883 for the facilities and equipment of the Federal Aviation Administration. The Committee's recommended distributions of the funds for each of the major accounts are as follows: FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT Projects Fiscal year 1998 budget estimate Committee recommendation Engineering, development, test, and evaluation: En route programs: Aviation weather services improvements $23,000,000 $23,000,000 Oceanic automation system 32,000,000 32,000,000 Next generation VHF air/ground communication system 7,400,000 7,400,000 Air traffic management 18,240,000 18,240,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, en route programs 80,640,000 80,640,000 ================================== ========================== Terminal programs: Terminal digital radar (ASR 11) 42,200,000 35,800,000 Terminal Automation Program 68,000,000 68,000,000 Weather systems processor [WSP] 6,200,000 5,200,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, terminal programs 116,400,000 109,000,000 ================================== ========================== Landing and navigational aids programs: Local area augmentation system [LAAS] for GPS 6,500,000 6,500,000 Wide area augmentation system [WAAS] 101,530,000 101,530,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, landing and navigational aids programs 108,030,000 108,030,000 ================================== ========================== Research, test, and evaluation equipment and facilities: Independent operational test and evaluation [IOT&E] sup 3,200,000 3,200,000 FAA Technical Center facility--technical building lease 5,290,000 5,290,000 NAS improvement of system support laboratory 2,000,000 2,000,000 Technical Center facilities 7,000,000 7,000,000 Infrared heating for aircraft deicing 970,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, research, test, and evaluation equipment and facilities 17,490,000 18,460,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Total, engineering, development, test, and evaluation 322,560,000 316,130,000 ================================== ========================== Air traffic control facilities and equipment: En route programs: Long Range Radar [LRR] Program--replace/establish 6,600,000 6,600,000 En Route Automation Program 214,240,000 214,240,000 Next generation weather radar [Nexrad] 3,000,000 3,000,000 Air traffic operations management system [ATOMS] 1,000,000 1,000,000 Weather and radar processor [WARP] 24,400,000 24,400,000 Aeronautical data link [ADL] applications 8,000,000 4,000,000 ARTCC building improvements/plant improvements 98,551,700 98,551,700 Voice switching and control system [VSCS] 50,700,000 50,700,000 Remote communication facilities [RCF's]--expand/relocate 1,440,000 3,140,000 Air traffic management [ATM] 44,200,000 44,200,000 Data multiplexing network [DMN] 3,900,000 3,900,000 Critical communications support 4,300,000 4,300,000 DOD base closure--facility transfer 2,200,000 2,200,000 Backup emergency communications [BUUEC]--interim 8,500,000 8,500,000 Air/ground communication radio frequency interference 2,000,000 2,000,000 ATC beacon interrogator [ATCBI] replacement 7,400,000 7,400,000 Low density radio communicaters link 29,840,000 23,840,000 ATC en route radar facilities 6,748,300 6,748,300 En route communications and control facilities 918,295 918,295 Volcano monitor 2,000,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, en route programs 517,938,295 511,638,295 ================================== ========================== Terminal programs: Terminal doppler weather radar [TDWR]--provide 4,800,000 2,300,000 Terminal Automation Program 40,000,000 40,000,000 Terminal air traffic control facilities--replace 62,000,000 70,000,000 Air traffic control tower [ATCT]/TRACON facilites--improve 18,631,115 Terminal voice switch replacement [TVSR]/enhanced terminal voice switch 9,940,000 1,640,000 Radio control equipment 3,000,000 3,000,000 Employee safety/OSHA and environmental standards compliance 43,700,000 43,700,000 Chicago TRACON 4,700,000 4,700,000 New Austin Airport at Bergstrom 3,700,000 Potomac (Dulles) TRACON 2,600,000 2,600,000 Denver TRACON 1,200,000 1,200,000 Northern California TRACON 21,700,000 21,700,000 Atlanta TRACON 15,600,000 15,600,000 Tower Automation Program 2,000,000 Voice Recorder Replacement Program [VRRP] 3,000,000 3,000,000 NAS infrastructure management systems [NIMS] 26,750,000 25,350,000 Airport surveillance radar [ASR 9] 23,700,000 23,700,000 Terminal radar [ASR]--improve 3,240,550 3,240,550 Terminal communications improvements 2,189,002 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, terminal programs 292,450,667 261,730,550 ================================== ========================== Flight service programs: Automated surface observing system [ASOS] 14,850,000 24,850,000 FSAS operational and supportability implementation system [OASIS] 4,900,000 4,900,000 Digital altimeter setting indicators [DASI] 1,600,000 1,600,000 Flight services facilities improvement 1,418,500 1,418,500 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, flight services 22,768,500 32,768,500 ================================== ========================== Landing and Navigational Aids Program: Very high frequency omnidirectional radio range [VOR] with distance measuring equipment 2,445,000 2,445,000 Instrument landing system [ILS]--establish/upgrade 3,000,000 23,000,000 ILS replace 2,200,000 2,200,000 Low level windshear alert system [LLWAS]--upgrade 4,300,000 4,300,000 Runway visual range [RVR]--establish 3,500,000 3,500,000 Gulf of Mexico Offshore Program 3,200,000 3,200,000 Instrument landing system [ILS]--replace Wilcox Cat II/III 2,745,000 2,745,000 Wide area augmentation system [WAAS] 51,300,000 51,300,000 Nondirectional beacon [NDB] 1,400,000 1,400,000 Navigational and landing aids--improve 2,402,538 3,357,538 Tactical landing systems 10,000,000 Precision approach path indicators [PAPI] 5,000,000 Juneau, AK 3,500,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, landing and navigational aids 76,492,538 115,947,538 ================================== ========================== Other ATC facilities programs: Alaskan NAS interfacility communications system [ANICS] 8,600,000 8,600,000 Fuel storage tank replacement and monitoring 30,000,000 30,000,000 FAA buildings and equipment--improve/modernize 10,000,000 10,000,000 Electrical power systems--sustain/support 16,200,000 20,200,000 Air navigational aids and air traffic control facilities (local projects) 2,000,000 2,000,000 Airport cable loop systems 500,000 500,000 Computer-aided engineering graphics [CAEG] replacement 1,000,000 1,000,000 Aircraft and Related Equipment Program 2,000,000 2,000,000 Aircraft fleet modernization 2,701,000 18,951,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, other ATC facility programs 73,001,000 93,251,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Total, air traffic control facilities and equipment 982,651,000 1,015,335,883 ================================== ========================== Nonair traffic control facilities and equipment: Support equipment: NAS Management Automation Program [NASMAP] 1,000,000 1,000,000 Hazardous materials management 20,000,000 7,000,000 Aviation safety analysis system [ASAS] 16,800,000 16,800,000 Operational data management system [ODMS] 1,600,000 1,600,000 Logistics support systems and facilities [LSSF] 9,749,000 9,749,000 Test equipment--maintenance support for replacement 500,000 500,000 Integrated flight quality assurance 4,000,000 4,000,000 Safety performance analysis system [SPAS] 4,100,000 4,100,000 Performance enhancement system [PENS] 11,000,000 11,000,000 National Aviation Safety Data Analysis Center [NASDAC] 2,000,000 2,000,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, support equipment 70,749,000 57,749,000 ================================== ========================== Training, equipment, and facilities: Distance learning 5,500,000 5,500,000 National airspace system [NAS] training facilities 1,500,000 1,500,000 Aeronautical Center training and support facilities 6,000,000 6,000,000 Airport firefighting training [RMESTC] 750,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, training, equipment, and facilities 13,000,000 13,750,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Total, nonair traffic control facilities and equipment 83,749,000 71,499,000 ================================== ========================== Mission support: System support and services: System engineering and development support 31,930,000 31,930,000 Program support leases 27,500,000 27,500,000 Logistics support services [LSS] 6,000,000 6,000,000 Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center--lease 15,200,000 15,200,000 In-plant national airspace system [NAS] contract support services 2,500,000 2,500,000 Transition engineering support 44,800,000 44,800,000 Frequency and spectrum engineering 1,500,000 1,500,000 Permanent change of station [PCS] moves 3,800,000 3,800,000 FAA corporate system architecture 5,200,000 5,200,000 Technical services support contract [TSSC] 54,700,000 54,700,000 Resource Tracking Program [RTP] 500,000 500,000 Center for Advanced Aviation System Development 55,300,000 55,300,000 Year 2000 date change program 18,000,000 18,000,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Total, mission support 266,930,000 266,930,000 ================================== ========================== Personnel and related expenses 219,110,000 219,110,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Total, all activities 1,875,000,000 1,889,004,883 engineering, development, test, and evaluation The Committee recommends $316,130,000 for various engineering, development, test, and evaluation activities. En route automation includes the display system replacement [DSR] as a cost-effective modification to the initial sector suite system [ISSS]; display channel complex rehost [DCCR], a low-risk contingency system; advanced en route automation [AERA], enhancements providing direct benefits to airway users; en route software development support [ERSDS], maintains software in existing system; en route automation equipment, maintains existing hardware; flight data input/output [FDIO]; and en route stand alone radar training system [ESARTS]. En route programs Aviation weather service improvements .--The Committee has included $23,000,000 as requested by the administration. The Committee is aware of a plan developed by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey in concert with the airports and airlines serving the New York/New Jersey region to procure with non-Federal funds a prototype integrated terminal weather system [ITWS] for installation at the New York TRACON. This installation will act as an interim measure until FAA installs a production model ITWS at Federal expense at the New York TRACON in 2001. The Committee strongly encourages the Administrator to work cooperatively and expeditiously with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and the airports and air carriers serving the New York/New Jersey region to ensure that this interim equipment is installed and operational as soon as possible. The Committee further directs that this interim installation, in no way, cause the FAA to delay the delivery of the production model ITWS to the New York TRACON. Oceanic automation system .--The oceanic automation system is a state-of-the-art platform that would provide improved air traffic control over the oceans. Of the amount requested, $2,000,000 would be used for continued development of the data link component, and project, $6,000,000 for program management, and $24,000,000 for phase 2, which is new software development replacing flight data processing structure and software. Terminal programs Terminal digital radar (ASR 11). --The Committee has provided $35,800,000 for the terminal digital radar (ASR 11) program, which is a joint program with the Department of Defense and the Federal Aviation Administration. That is $6,400,000 less than the administration's request of $42,200,000. The administration's request includes $33,000,000 for procurement of ASR 11 units and associated support costs and $9,200,000 for digitizers for the ASR 8 systems. The Committee understands that FAA plans to buy 10 digitizers under the request and that the leadtime for adding digitizers to the ASR 8's is about 1 year. FAA's current schedule shows that 7 of the 10 digitizers are designated for STARS equipment that will not be operational before May 2001. Therefore, the Committee has reduced the request by $6,400,000, an amount which can be deferred until fiscal year 1999 with no adverse impact on the program. Terminal automation program. --The Committee has provided the requested $68,000,000 for the terminal automation program, also known as standard terminal automation replacement system [STARS]. The fiscal year 1998 request is the second year on the STARS contract. The contract was awarded in September 1996. Fiscal year 1998 funds will be used to test and enhance commercial-off-the-shelf/nondevelopmental item [COTS/NDI]-based automated radar terminal systems for initial use in terminal radar approach control facilities and to develop the final system capability. The STARS contract is an exceptionally aggressive contract and one which is heavily dependent on software development notwithstanding the emphasis on COTS/NDI. Weather systems processor .--The administration has requested $6,200,000 for the weather systems processor program. Funds in fiscal year 1998 would be used to continue limited production activities and to establish final production baseline. These processors will provide terminal weather radar capability at those ASR equipped airports that do not have terminal doppler weather radars. The Committee continues to be concerned that there are a number of line items in the FAA's facilities and equipment and research, engineering, and development budgets which basically are intended to produce the same solution. The administration's request includes $1,000,000 to develop specifications and a statement of work for the final production contract. The Committee understands that the FAA does not plan to award the final production contract until fiscal year 2001 and so has reduced $1,000,000 from the request. FAA can defer costs related to the final production contract until fiscal year 1999, which will allow time to identify and resolve problems that may occur with the first eight systems and to decide on whether this technology or another is the best way to provide a weather radar solution at existing airports. Landing and navigational aids programs Local area augmentation system [LAAS] for GPS .--The Committee has included $6,500,000 as requested by the administration. These funds will support development of the functional specification for LAAS based on the architecture to be selected in fiscal year 1997. Hardware and software fabrication and demonstration will commence to evaluate and validate the functional specification and minimum operational performance standards. As development of this system moves forward, the Committee urges the FAA to give serious consideration to installation of early production units at Anchorage and Fairbanks International Airports in Alaska, where they will have significant benefits. Wide area augmentation system [WAAS]. --Despite serious concerns about rising projections of the total cost of the WAAS program and concerns about whether the program is being well managed, the Committee is including the full request for this program but directs that none of the fiscal year 1998 funding is to be obligated until the Secretary reports to the Senate and House Transportation Appropriations Subcommittees on the status and management of the program. Specifically, the Secretary should provide a detailed report to the Senate and House Appropriations Committees, including: (1) key program milestones and deliverables related to the systems, communications, software, and fielding components of the program and plans for developmental and operational testing of the system during the upcoming fiscal year; (2) baseline cost, schedule, and performance goals; (3) the probability of meeting specified milestones and deliverables; (4) a detailed assessment of the technical risks associated with the major components of the WAAS program and FAA's plans to mitigate those risks; and (5) a certification by the Administrator of the FAA that the fiscal management controls of the prime contractor and its major subcontractors meet or exceed accepted U.S. Government standards. Additionally, FAA shall report quarterly on actual progress made against the baseline cost, schedule, and performance goals, the justification for any deviation from the goals, and the impact of any deviations. Specifically, the FAA shall report: (1) current cost variances that are 10 percent or more above the baseline goals, reasons for the variances, and corrective actions that have or will be taken; (2) current schedule variances that are 10 percent or more behind the baseline schedule, reasons for the variances, and corrective actions that have or will be taken; (3) variances in performance goals from the baseline, reasons for the variances, and corrective actions that have or will be taken; (4) the effect of corrective actions cited above on the overall program cost, schedule, and performance goals; (5) an overall progress rating, based on specified criteria, that indicates whether the contractor is meeting cost, schedule, and technical requirements for: the total program, systems, communications, software, fielding, resource management, and program management; (6) description of any modifications to the WAAS cost, schedule, and performance baselines; and (7) the status of contractor staffing. Not later than March 1, 1998, the Comptroller General shall review the status of the WAAS program and submit to the Senate and House Committees on Appropriations a report on the results of the review. The report shall address the status of cost, schedule, and performance modifications and include a conclusion regarding whether the WAAS program is likely to be successfully carried out within the cost and schedule baseline. Of the funds made available for WAAS in fiscal year 1998, the Committee directs that FAA not obligate more than 70 percent until the earlier of April 1, 1998, or the date on which the Senate and House Transportation Appropriations Subcommittees advise the Administrator that the Administrator may obligate the remaining funds. If, after reviewing the Department's reports and the Comptroller General's report, the subcommittees do not have confidence in the progress of the WAAS contract, they may consider directing reprogramming of WAAS funds to the air traffic management subactivity to support the center/TRACON automation system, conflict probe, and collaborative decisionmaking programs. Research, test, and evaluation equipment and facilities Infrared heating for aircraft deicing .--The Committee has added $970,000 to demonstrate infrared heating for aircraft deicing at the Rhinelander/Oneida County Airport. This technology has been tested by the FAA, and that test found that its application appears to be a cost-effective alternative to glycol for deicing aircraft and that additional testing is warranted. Infrared heating also offers environmental benefits in that its use will reduce contamination of the watershed from airport runoff. Rhinelander/Oneida County Airport typifies the small commercial airport, and the climate of the region and the location of the airport in northern Wisconsin are appropriate for further evaluation of this technology in an operational commercial environment. The Committee believes this project will move us closer to making this advanced safety technology available to pilots, airports, and passengers across the country. AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT En route programs Aeronautical data link [ADL] applications .--The administration is requesting $8,000,000 to continue development of ADL, which will provide the infrastructure necessary to allow the exchange of controller-pilot communications and flight information services using digital technology in the en route, terminal, and tower environments. The Committee understands that the FAA has been scaling back ADL requirements to design a more cost-effective and affordable project and is assessing the project's remaining requirements. As of April 1997, the FAA had obligated only $1,200,000 of the $17,425,000 that Congress appropriated in fiscal year 1997 and further obligations were pending clarification of the program's direction. Because of uncertainty over FAA's priorities and plans for ADL and the time it will take to obligate available funds once requirement decisions are made, the Committee is recommending $4,000,000 for this program in fiscal year 1998, which will allow FAA to spend down available, unobligated balances. Air route traffic control center [ARTCC] improvement/plant modernization/space expansion.-- FAA is requesting $98,551,700 to perform needed modernization and expansion at its ARTCC's to accommodate new equipment that will modernize controller displays and communications systems. The Committee has provided the full request. Honolulu CERAP .--For the relocation of the Honolulu Combined Center radar approach control [CERAP], the Committee has included $12,100,000. The FAA has made the determination to relocate the CERAP to the Honolulu air traffic control tower/terminal radar approach control at the Honolulu International Airport. According to the FAA, the design and construction of the new facility will be completed in July 1999. After construction of the new facility, it will take approximately 1 year to install and test the communications and radar equipment and an additional 6 months to train the controllers. The CERAP at Honolulu International Airport is scheduled to be operational on January 1, 2001. The Committee has supported this relocation effort in the past and expects the FAA to meet its January 1, 2001, deadline. Any further delay of this relocation project is unacceptable to the Committee. Remote communications facilities [RCF's]--expand/create .--RCF's enable pilots to communicate with air traffic controllers and flight service stations in areas where normal radio communications are not possible. The administration requested $1,440,000 to expand or relocate five existing RCF's. The Committee has added $1,700,000 to establish new remote communication outlets in five Alaska sites where air/ground communications are nonexistent and aviation safety is threatened. Low density radio communications link .--Congress enacted legislation that has resulted in the sale of aeronautical radio spectrum used for operation of FAA long-range radars and FAA microwave radio communications links. As a result of these sales, FAA must relinquish operation of some of its communication and radar systems effective January 1, 1999. FAA is the largest single Government user of radio spectrum, and each frequency assignment supports safety, capacity, and efficiency. Therefore, the loss of such spectrum required for existing and future airspace operations could have serious impacts on the aviation traffic services provided. The fiscal year 1998 request of $29,840,000 is to continue conversion of FAA communication facilities to higher frequencies. The Committee understands that about $10,000,000 of the request is to install filters on long-range radars and that, of this amount, FAA plans to obligate about $4,000,000 during fiscal year 1998 to install filters on newer radars and $6,000,000 on older radars. Before that can occur, however, the Committee understands that FAA has to do prototype work to develop the filters that can work on these radars and that work is expected to take through July 1998. A contract for filter installation will likely not be awarded until about February 1999. Therefore, the Committee has reduced the request by $6,000,000 for filter installation that can be deferred until fiscal year 1999. Volcano monitor .--The Committee has included an additional $2,000,000 for the Alaska Volcano Observatory for equipment and data transmission facilities on suspect volcanoes across the Alaska peninsula and the Aleutian Islands. The Committee urges the FAA to incorporate this item in its future budget requests. Terminal programs Terminal doppler weather radar [TDWR] .--The administration is requesting $4,800,000 to complete implementation activities for three TDWR systems that are currently in storage. Of the request, about $3,800,000 is for land acquisition, facility construction, equipment installation and checkout, and other site activities associated with the San Juan, Chicago-Midway, and New York systems. The Committee understands that FAA is considering shifting the planned system from Chicago-Midway to Colorado Springs (in which case, the existing system at Chicago O'Hare will provide coverage for Chicago-Midway) and that FAA does not expect to have a final environmental impact statement for the proposed New York site until December 1997 so that the system is not expected to be operational until late 1999. Because of the uncertainties and delays with respect to the Chicago-Midway and New York installations, the Committee is recommending a $2,500,000 reduction in the request. If FAA is able to move forward more quickly, it should have unobligated funds available to proceed. Terminal automation program .--The administration is requesting $40,000,000 for this subactivity. This includes $37,500,000 to procure five STARS systems and six support systems (STARS central support complex [SCSC] and five operational support facilities [OSF]), $1,000,000 to replace old television microwave link equipment with video compression to maintain the integrity of the digital bright radar indicator tower equipment [DBRITE] signal at affected satellite towers, and $1,500,000 for terminal software development implementation. The Committee is very concerned about this important program and whether the FAA can meet the aggressive schedule it has set. The Committee is including the full request in order to provide the FAA the opportunity to demonstrate successful management of this program using the new acquisition authority the Congress provided last year. In April 1997, the Department sought approval to reprogram $10,000,000 in small reductions from a broad range of F&E programs to the terminal automation program in order to have initial production items, including the first site (Boston) and support systems (training and logistics), in place when the STARS software becomes available. Reprogramming was necessary because, as a result of FAA's new acquisition process, the contract was awarded and the software was expected to be available sooner than originally projected. Both the Senate and House Appropriations Subcommittees on Transportation agreed on the reprogramming of the $10,000,000, but, as a result of a disagreement between the subcommittees on another element of the proposed reprogramming, the FAA did not proceed with the reprogramming for the terminal automation program. The Committee regrets FAA's failure to reprogram the $10,000,000 when both subcommittees agreed to that reprogramming. If a reprogramming is still necessary, the Committee urges the FAA to reprogram up to $10,000,000 as needed from F&E funds provided for fiscal year 1998 or prior years to the terminal automation system in order to meet the needs of the STARS program. The Committee stands ready to assist the FAA to resolve problems with this program as they are identified and as solutions are proposed. The Committee is not sympathetic with an approach that would fund two simultaneous, alternative approaches in the event one is not successful. Terminal air traffic control facilities--replace .--The Committee has included an additional $8,000,000 above the administration's request of $62,000,000. The Committee intends $5,000,000 of this increase to be added to $700,000 in the request for a new control tower at North Las Vegas, NV, in order to accelerate this project and $3,000,000 to be used for a new control tower at Martin State Airport in Maryland. Martin is a reliever airport for Baltimore-Washington International Airport with growing traffic, and its present tower is almost 50 years old. Airport traffic control tower [ATCT]/TRACON facilities--improve .--The administration is requesting $18,631,115 to upgrade and improve various terminal facilities and equipment on a continuing basis to provide an acceptable level of safe service and to meet current and future operational requirements. As of March 31, 1997, ATCT/TRACON facilities improvement had $36,100,000 in unobligated balances. The Committee understands that FAA plans to obligate only $23,200,000 of that amount through the end of fiscal year 1998 and to obligate only $4,800,000 of the requested $18,631,115 in fiscal year 1998. Therefore, the Committee is recommending no new funding for this program in fiscal year 1998. FAA should have ample funds from previous years. Within the amounts available for obligation, the Committee urges the FAA to seriously consider installation of an upgraded 360-degree air traffic control simulator at Chicago's O'Hare Airport. The existing 135-degree simulator is ill-equipped to handle the training needed for the new traffic control tower and, as a result, air traffic controllers are training on the job, increasing the chance for distractions to operating controllers and delays to the flying public. Terminal voice switch replacement/enhancement .--The Committee has reduced the requested funding for this program by $8,300,000. The administration's request of $9,940,000 includes $8,300,000 to procure 16 enhanced terminal voice switches [ETVS]. The Committee is recommending a reduction of $8,300,000 because it understands that it will be at least July 1997 before FAA completes acceptance testing of the ETVS and FAA already has funding for the first 100 such switches. If the manufacturer continues to meet its scheduled milestones, FAA can use prior-year unobligated funds to continue this effort. The Committee urges the FAA to replace the outdated communications system at Charlotte-Douglas Airport in North Carolina with the rapid deployment voice switch [RDVS], rather than the untested ETVS, as quickly as possible. New Austin Airport at Bergstrom .--The city of Austin, TX, is constructing a new air carrier airport at the former Bergstrom Air Force Base, which was closed on September 30, 1993. The administration is requesting $3,700,000 in fiscal year 1998 to complete the establishment of communications facilities, approach/landing aids, the weather sensor processor, and to relocate radar and navigation equipment. The Committee is recommending no new funding for this program in fiscal year 1998 because it understands that FAA's spending plan for funds that have already been appropriated leave approximately $14,400,000 at the end of fiscal year 1998, much more than the requested new funding. Potomac TRACON .--The Committee has provided $2,600,000 for the Potomac TRACON. The Committee believes that the administration's request is sufficient to meet proposed program initiatives for the Potomac TRACON. Tower automation program .--In today's airport traffic control towers [ATCT], there is a proliferation of locally procured information display systems [IDS]. These systems provide airport weather and environmental information to controllers. These systems also exchange airport information with airport management, air carriers, and the National Weather Service. The existing IDS must be maintained and brought under configuration control in such a way that they can be sustained as a national program. The administration is requesting $2,000,000 in fiscal year 1998 to initiate actions to bring the existing IDS systems under configuration control as a national program and establish a maintenance program for the existing IDS systems. The Committee is concerned that FAA has yet to identify the program office to be responsible for implementing the IDS program or to develop a schedule baseline for the program. Moreover, the Committee understands that, after investing $142,800,000 in the tower automation program over the past 15 years, the FAA decided in February 1997 to end the program because the agency viewed the program as a low priority. As a result, FAA has little to show for this multimillion-dollar effort. The Committee does not intend to provide additional funds for this program until the FAA develops a sound plan. If the FAA is ready to proceed in fiscal year 1998, it is the Committee's understanding that it should have sufficient unobligated funds from previous years to undertake the planned activities. NAS infrastructure management systems [NIMS] .--The administration is requesting $26,750,000 to provide the next generation of tools, services, and operational philosophies that govern the management, operation, and maintenance of the NAS infrastructure. The Committee recommends a reduction of $1,400,000 from the request based on its understanding that FAA has revised its estimated needs in fiscal year 1998 for wireless communications downward by that amount. The Committee is concerned that, even after revising its estimated needs, the FAA is assuming what appear to be very high unit costs for wireless communication devices--specifically, $400 per pager, $917 per cell phone, and $4,650 per satellite phone. The Committee directs the Administrator to provide a justification to the Committee by August 30, 1997, for the unit costs it is assuming for these devices. Airport surveillance radar [ASR 9] .--The Committee is including $23,700,000, as requested by the administration. Within the funds available, the Committee urges the FAA to give serious consideration to installation of an additional ASR 9 radar at Salt Lake City International Airport. The current system is inhibited by the surrounding 10,000- to 12,000-foot mountains. As a result, aircraft approaching from the south are not seen until they are essentially on the boundary that separates approach control airspace and Salt Lake City Center airspace. This creates problems with approach controllers' ability to gauge how much traffic is coming from the south to blend it with the traffic arriving from the north. Terminal communications improvements .--The administration is requesting $2,189,002 for this program in fiscal year 1998. The Committee recommends no new funding in view of the large amount of unobligated funds remaining from prior years. Flight service programs Automated surface observing system [ASOS] .--The Committee has provided $24,850,000 for ASOS, $10,000,000 more than the administration's request. The Committee intends that the requested $14,850,000 will be used to continue commissioning systems procured through fiscal year 1996 and for related program management costs and the additional $10,000,000 will be used to procure 50 new ASOS units. Last year, the Committee discovered that FAA did not adequately fund the program for several years. Funding was not provided for connectivity lines, controller equipment, or operation and maintenance funds. That oversight has left the FAA short of assets to fund ASOS systems for nontowered airports. The FAA, the National Transportation Safety Board [NTSB], and user aviation associations have identified over 200 sites which should be equipped with ASOS. While the FAA works through previously identified problems, the ASOS manufacturing line must remain in operation. If the assembly line shuts down, it will be difficult to restructure the manufacturing team in the future. The facts relevant to ASOS demonstrate that there is a requirement for more than 200 units. The Committee urges the FAA to install one of these new ASOS units at Mitchell Airport in South Dakota to replace an aged AWOS at that airport, which has exceeded it design life. Landing and navigational aids program Airport lighting .--The Committee is concerned about factors, such as mountainous terrain, poorly equipped runways, bad weather, and extensive darkness, that create a challenging aviation environment in some parts of the country. It is the Committee's understanding that there are technologies in airport lighting, such as lasers, fiber optics, and energy-efficient lamps, that could minimize the impact of difficult terrain, make lighting more affordable, and could provide improved operational safety. The Committee urges the FAA to review lighting capabilities at airports affected by such factors and to report to the Committee by February 1, 1998, on recommendations for lighting improvements which could enhance the safety of airport operations. Instrument landing system [ILS] establish/upgrade .--The administration is requesting $3,000,000 to install previously procured systems and associated equipment. In recent years, the Congress has repeatedly provided the FAA added resources to purchase additional ILS equipment to meet substantial ongoing system requirements. This enhances safety, capacity, and efficiency benefits at airports. At the present time, the FAA has only 45 remaining contract options available to acquire ILS equipment meeting all its precision approach requirements and specifications. The Committee is increasing funding for this program by $20,000,000 for FAA to use to exercise remaining options. FAA is directed to make the new equipment available on an expedited basis under streamlined acquisition procedures. The Committee urges the FAA to install an ILS at Bessemer Airport, AL, and at Manistee Blacker Airport, MI. Bessemer is a reliever airport for Birmingham International Airport. The Committee understands that installation of an ILS at Bessemer Airport will promote economic development of the community. Mannistee Blacker Airport is the only airport in Michigan with scheduled air service under the Essential Air Service Program that does not have an ILS. Without an ILS, the unreliability of air service at Manistee Blacker seriously reduces potential passenger traffic. Navigational and landing aids--improve .--The Committee recommends $3,357,538 for this subactivity, an increase of $955,000 over the administration request. The Committee directs the FAA to use $875,000 of the increased funding to improve the Rutland, VT, State airport instrument approach by reducing the ceiling and visibility minima, thereby providing increased reliability and safety for aircraft attempting to land at the airport. The Committee directs that FAA provide $875,000 for engineering, equipment, installation, site acquisition, and development of procedures. The Committee further directs that FAA provide $80,000 to install a standard omnidirectional approach lighting system [ODALS] under the approach to runway 9 at Cordova Airport in Alaska to replace the existing nonstandard guidance light facility, which is no longer sustainable and presents a safety hazard to technicians. Tactical landing systems .--The Committee has included $10,000,000 to procure 10 new tactical landing systems [TLS]. Using existing aircraft avionics, the system is designed to provide both guidance commands and safety alerts to pilots. All instrument flight rule [IFR] equipped aircraft in the United States are able to use the TLS without any new modifications or pilot training. These systems have the potential to significantly improve aviation safety. The Committee intends that the systems be installed and tested at regional airports that exhibit requirements for improved airport economic development and safety of operation including, but not limited to, the Pullman-Moscow Regional Airport in Washington State; the Friedman Memorial Airport in Idaho; and at rural airports in Brigham City, Logan, Wendover, and Tooele, UT. Precision approach path indicators [PAPI] .--The Committee has included $5,000,000 for the PAPI navigational aid systems. The Committee has included funding with the understanding that FAA intends to replace existing visual approach slope indicators with PAPI, and funds are needed to prevent existing production lines from being closed. These systems can be of particular value at remote airports in Alaska where there is not sufficient lighting from surroundings and snow cover often masks terrain features making it difficult for the pilot to establish the proper glide angle for landing. Therefore, the Committee directs the FAA to install 10 of the PAPI systems at remote Alaskan airport locations. Juneau, AK .--The Committee has included $3,500,000 to buy the two wind profilers currently being leased at the airport along with new computers and navigational aids and to install anemometers, which measure wind speed and direction, and for the costs to calibrate the new equipment. These improvements will enable the airport to have fewer interruptions due to bad weather. Other ATC facilities programs Electrical power systems--sustain/support .--The Committee is including an additional $4,000,000 in this program to accelerate replacement of existing, nonsupportable engine generators and to replace FAA's electrical distribution system at Cold Bay, AK, with an underground electrical distribution system. The Committee is concerned about continuing power outages at FAA facilities that cause delays and jeopardize the safety of the traveling public and expects the FAA to use $2,000,000 of the additional funds provided to move ahead more quickly to install modern, more reliable backup generators in its facilities. The other $2,000,000 is for FAA to upgrade and bury its cable system in Cold Bay. The current old and outdated system has caused 24 out of 30 power outages in the community over a 10-year period. When FAA power goes down, especially during bad weather and nondaylight hours air service, air service can be dramatically affected. Aircraft fleet modernization .--The Committee recommends $18,951,000 for this subactivity, an increase of $16,250,000 over the administration's request. The Committee directs the FAA to use the increased funding to exercise the option presently in place for the acquisition of one new modified Learjet 60 flight inspection and airways calibration aircraft under the contract presently in force between the FAA and E-Systems. The contract was awarded to E-Systems in January 1993 and has a total projected value, including support and exercise of all options, of $400,000,000. The initial contract in 1993 was for $65,000,000 and included the purchase of two Learjet 60's. These aircraft have been in operation for 1\1/2\ years, and the Committee understands that FAA is pleased with their performance. Exercise of the option for one additional aircraft will continue the fleet modernization program. MAJOR EQUIPMENT ACTIVITY TERMINAL DOPPLER WEATHER RADAR City Acceptance Commissioning dates Memphis July 1993 December 1994. Houston Intercontinental March 1993 July 1994. Atlanta April 1993 December 1995. Washington National February 1994 January 1996. Denver December 1993 August 1995. Chicago O'Hare March 1994 July 1996. St. Louis May 1994 February 1995. Orlando June 1994 April 1996. New Orleans July 1994 March 1996. Tampa December 1994 April 1996. Miami November 1995 June 1996. Pittsburgh December 1994 May 1997. Andrews AFB ...do August 1996 Newark ...do July 1997. Boston April 1995 January 1996. Kansas City December 1994 July 1995. Detroit March 1996 September 1996. Houston Hobby August 1995 July 1996. Dallas/Love May 1995 January 1996. Dallas/Fort Worth June 1995 June 1996. Dayton May 1995 July 1997. Wichita June 1995 September 1995. Indianapolis July 1995 October 1996. Cincinnati July 1996 April 1997. Philadelphia ...do May 1997. Phoenix March 1997 April 1997. Milwaukee ...do May 1997. Chicago Midway To be determined To be determined. Cleveland July 1996 October 1996. Columbus December 1996 April 1997. San Juan To be determined To be determined. West Palm Beach February 1996 March 1997. Nashville April 1997 June 1997. Louisville June 1997 July 1997. Washington Dulles November 1996 April 1997. Charlotte September 1995 December 1995. Salt Lake City March 1997 June 1997. Fort Lauderdale To be determined To be determined. Baltimore November 1996 May 1997. Raleigh/Durham April 1997 June 1997. Minneapolis March 1997 April 1997. Oklahoma City ...do Do. Tulsa May 1997 June 1997. New York City (JFK and LGA) To be determined To be determined. Las Vegas To be determined To be determined. AIRPORT SURFACE DETECTION EQUIPMENT [ASDE 3] Site location Delivery date Commissioning date FAA Academy\1\ NA NA FAA Technical Center\2\ NA NA Pittsburgh, PA December 1989 June 1996. San Francisco November 1991 October 1995. Dallas/Fort Worth\3\ February 1992 March 1995. Philadelphia ...do March 1996. Los Angeles\3\ August 1992 April 1995. Detroit ...do December 1994. Cleveland ...do Do. Boston ...do March 1995. Portland ...do December 1994. Atlanta September 1992. January 1995. Seattle ...do December 1993. Los Angeles\3\ February 1993 February 1995. Denver (DIA)\3\ March 1993 May 1995. St. Louis December 1993 February 1995. Denver (DIA)\3\ ...do October 1995. New York-Kennedy January 1994 February 1995. Minneapolis July 1994 March 1995. Anchorage August 1994 October 1995. New Orleans October 1994 September 1995. Baltimore November 1994 June 1995. Kansas City December 1994 May 1995. Miami February 1995 November 1996. Houston\3\ ...do August 1995. Memphis June 1995 November 1997. Chicago June 1995 April 1996. Houston\3\ August 1996 April 1997. Charlotte May 1999 November 1999. Louisville\4\ January 1999 Do. Washington National February 1996 August 1997. Cincinnati October 1995 September 1996. Dulles April 1997 April 1998. San Diego November 1995 November 1996. Dallas-Fort Worth\3\\4\ November 1996 November 1997. Andrews AFB June 1999 November 1999. Salt Lake City\4\ February 1998 February 1999. Las Vegas\4\ June 1998 June 1999. New York-LaGuardia September 1998 September 1999. Newark October 1997 October 1998. \1\FAA training/field support/depot support facility. \2\To be relocated to Aeronautical Center, Oklahoma City. \3\Dual sensor facilities. \4\Assets redirected from Tampa, Raleigh-Durham, Orlando, Orange County. INSTRUMENT LANDING SYSTEMS--WILCOX CAT II/III--REPLACE Location Runway Newburg/Stewart AFB, NY 9 Houston, TX 27 Oklahoma City, OK 35R Do 17 Greensboro, NC 23 Raleigh-Durham, NC 23R Orlando, FL 17 Tallahassee, FL 27 Salt Lake City, UT 16L Everett, WA 16R JFK, NY 22R Note.--Changing conditions at airport locations may dictate that installation priorities be modified. RUNWAY VISUAL RANGE Yakutat, AK Buffalo, NY LaGuardia, NY Norfolk, VA Champaign, IL Columbus, OH Bedford, MA Groton, CT Salem, OR Seattle-Boeing, WA Everett, WA Savannah, GA Greensboro, NC Lexington, KY Alexandria, LA Amarillo, TX Redding, CA Salinas, CA Santa Rosa, CA Note.--Changing conditions at airport locations may dictate that installation priorities be modified. TERMINAL AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL FACILITIES Funding for terminal air traffic control facilities started in previous years: Merrill, AK Fort Smith, AR Covington, KY Louisville, KY Worcester, MA St. Louis (ATCT), MO St. Paul, MN Roswell, NM Syracuse, NY Portland, OR Beaumont, TX Houston (Hobby), TX Houston (IAH), TX Salt Lake City (ATCT), UT Salt Lake City (TRACON), UT Phase III for terminal air traffic control facilities started in fiscal year 1996 and before: Birmingham, AL Newark, NJ St. Louis, MO Phase II funding for terminal air traffic control facilities started in fiscal year 1997 and before: Abilene, TX E. St. Louis, IL Seattle, WA Richmond, VA Savannah, GA Boston, MA Phase I funding for terminal air traffic control facilities to be started in fiscal year 1998: Las Vegas, NV Medford, OR Swanton, OH NONAIR TRAFFIC CONTROL FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT Explosive detection equipment .--The Committee continues to place an extremely high priority on efforts to combat the threat of terrorism. Although funds have not been directed in this appropriation specifically for acquisition of additional explosives detection systems, the Committee is mindful of the possibility that the FAA may determine that additional systems should be purchased during the coming year. Should that be the case, the Committee expects that the FAA will request the requisite funds in fiscal year 1998 and will request the Committee's approval for a reprogramming of funds to meet that need. The deployment of explosives detection equipment would be of particular utility at airports where there is a security need for 100 percent of checked baggage from tour groups or from cruise ships due to the fact that the baggage has been separated from its owner subsequent to its being packed. The Committee is concerned by operational problems currently being experienced at these airports due to the FAA's requiring that all tour groups baggage be hand-searched. Support equipment Hazardous materials management .--The FAA must comply with all Federal, State, interstate, and local pollution control statutes in the same manner and to the same degree as any other person or entity. In 1998, the FAA began implementing a program in compliance with Federal regulations to identify and clean up environmental contamination at FAA facilities. The administration is requesting $20,000,000 for continuation of the program. The Committee understands that FAA officials were not able to respond to a request from the General Accounting Office for information on the status of activity at the 116 sites or for a spending plan to show past, current, and future projects and how $17,500,000 in unobligated funds from fiscal years 1996 and 1997 and the requested $20,000,000 in fiscal year 1998 are to be spent. In view of the large unobligated balances, the Committee is recommending a reduction of $13,000,000 from the request level for this program in fiscal year 1998. The Committee urges the Administrator to review this program and be sure that it is under good management and that funds previously appropriated are being used to clean up contaminated sites. Training, equipment and facilities Firefighting training [RMESTC] .--The Committee is recommending an additional $750,000 for additional training equipment for the Rocky Mountain Services Training Center [RMESTC]. RMESTC was created with FAA funds of $7,000,000 to provide specialized training and certification in fighting and preventing aircraft fires at class A, B, and C airports across the country. Those classes of airports account for 68 percent of all certified airports in the United States. The funding provided in fiscal year 1998 will expand the training capabilities to provide training for all emergency personnel. The local community will provide 37.5 percent of the expansion. Converging runway display aid. --The Committee is disturbed by the continuing delays in the implementation of a fully operational converging runway display aid [CRDA] at the New York TRACON. The Committee recognizes that the system has now been installed but the FAA is seeking to resolve automation interface problems. The Committee requests the Administrator to make every possible effort to bring the newly installed CRDA into full operation as soon as possible. ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS The Committee has not included the advance appropriations for fiscal years 1999 through 2005 requested by the administration. There has been substantial uncertainty and change with respect to projects financed through the ``Facilities and equipment'' account, and the Committee believes that continuing, annual congressional review of the status and funding needs of these projects is critical. RESEARCH, ENGINEERING, AND DEVELOPMENT (Airport and Airway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1997 $208,412,000 Budget estimate, 1998 200,000,000 Committee recommendation 214,250,000 This appropriation finances research, engineering, and development programs to improve the national air traffic control system by increasing its safety, security, productivity, and capacity. The programs are designed to meet the expected air traffic demands of the future and to promote flight safety. The major objectives are to keep the current system operating safely and efficiently; to protect the environment; and to modernize the system through improvements in facilities, equipment, techniques, and procedures in order to insure that the system will safely and efficiently handle the volume of aircraft traffic expected to materialize in the future. The bill includes $214,250,000 for research, engineering, and development. This level is $14,250,000 above the budget request. The Committee suggests the following allocation: Fiscal year 1997 appropriation Fiscal year 1998 budget estimate Committee recommendation System development and infrastructure: $1,860,000 $1,164,000 $1,164,000 -------------------------------- ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal 13,660,000 75,550,000 75,550,000 ================================ ================================== ========================== Capacity and air traffic management technology: 4,000,000 2,986,000 2,986,000 -------------------------------- ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal 34,889,000 9,108,000 9,108,000 ================================ ================================== ========================== Communications, navigation, and surveillance: 6,000,000 4,706,000 4,706,000 -------------------------------- ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal 19,000,000 15,132,000 15,132,000 ================================ ================================== ========================== Weather 13,000,000 3,982,000 8,982,000 Airport technology 5,200,000 5,458,000 5,458,000 Aircraft safety technology: 6,993,000 2,049,000 2,049,000 -------------------------------- ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal 36,504,000 26,625,000 34,625,000 ================================ ================================== ========================== System security technology: 41,397,000 36,200,000 37,450,000 -------------------------------- ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal 57,055,000 49,895,000 51,145,000 ================================ ================================== ========================== Human factors and aviation medicine: 10,898,000 7,272,000 7,272,000 -------------------------------- ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal 23,504,000 10,737,000 10,737,000 ================================ ================================== ========================== Environment and energy 3,600,000 2,891,000 2,891,000 Innovative/cooperative research 2,000,000 622,000 622,000 ================================ ================================== ========================== Total 208,412,000 200,000,000 214,250,000 The objectives of and Committee recommendations for the 10 major activities in FAA's Research, Engineering, and Development Program are discussed below. SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT AND INFRASTRUCTURE Objectives: To provide (1) a systems engineering approach and benefit/cost analyses to the development of a comprehensive research, engineering, and development program and (2) visibility, accountability, coordination, and control of the research, engineering, and development activities. Advisory committee .--The Aviation Safety Research Act of 1988 directed FAA to establish an advisory committee to provide a strategic look at those research and development efforts that would encourage FAA to take advantage of current technology and interface with activities being performed with other Government agencies and research laboratories. The Committee believes that this is a good use of Federal funds and has fully funded the $1,164,000 requested for system planning and resource management, which includes support for the FAA RE&D advisory committee and the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics [RTCA]. FAA Technical Center--Laboratory .--The administration's request was $3,341,000 for work at the FAA Technical Center. The Committee fully funds the administration's request. Center for Advanced Aviation Systems Development [CAASD] .--The Committee fully funds CAASD, which is for the Mitre support contract. Personnel and related expenses .--The Committee has provided $65,601,000, as requested by the administration. The Committee believes that including personnel and related expenses as a separate line item in R,E&D, rather than spreading them across all the individual program budget line items, ensures greater accountability for these costs and provides greater flexibility for FAA to reallocate R,E&D in-house staffing resources to high priority research programs in a timely fashion. This treatment also parallels the treatment of these costs in the facilities and equipment account. CAPACITY AND AIR TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY Objectives: To ensure that air traffic management operations safety is maintained and then improved, to increase system capacity and utilization of existing airspace and airport resources, and to accommodate greater user flexibility and efficiency. COMMUNICATIONS, NAVIGATION, AND SURVEILLANCE Objectives: To develop and exploit high-quality communications, navigation, and surveillance services and make them available anywhere on the surface of the Earth, using satellite and data-link technologies when they are cost effective. WEATHER Objectives: To improve the timeliness and accuracy of weather forecasting in order to enhance flight safety, increase system capacity, improve flight efficiency, reduce air traffic control [ATC] and pilot workload, improve flight planning, and increase productivity. The Committee recommends $8,982,000 for the weather program, a $5,000,000 increase over the administration's request. This increase reflects the Committee's concern about the impact of weather on aviation safety and the need to continue an aggressive program of research and development. The funds the Committee has added to this program are intended to continue FAA's sensor for optically characterized ring-eddy atmospheric turbulence emanating sound [Project SOCRATES]. Project SOCRATES is the only ongoing project in the FAA to develop a new sensor technology aimed at improving air passenger safety by early detection of atmospheric hazards, including wind shear, wake vortex, and clear air turbulence. AIRPORT TECHNOLOGY Objectives: To provide new and improved standards, criteria, and guidelines to plan, design, construct, operate, and maintain the Nation's airports, heliports, and vertiports. AIRCRAFT SAFETY TECHNOLOGY Objectives: To develop technologies, standards, and maintenance regulations that maintain or improve aircraft safety in an evolving, changing, and demanding aviation environment. Aging aircraft .--The Committee has provided $20,966,000 for FAA's research in the aging aircraft area, $8,000,000 more than the administration's request. This research supports airborne data monitoring systems, corrosion fatigue research, the Center for Aviation Systems Reliability [CASR], and the Aging Aircraft Nondestructive Inspection Validation Center [AANC], which conduct research in these areas. The Committee is concerned that the administration's request for this line item would hold aging aircraft research at a no-growth posture, which would severely strain the aging aircraft program. The administration request does not follow through on the recent Gore Commission report recommending that the aging aircraft program be increased to cover nonstructural systems. The Committee recommendation includes the $3,000,000 in the administration's request for direct support of the AANC's work. Of the request level, the Committee expects $1,000,000 to be available for aging aircraft-related activities at CASR. The additional funding above the request includes $6,000,000 to support the Airworthiness Assurance Center of Excellence, which the FAA is forming to integrate inspection, crashworthiness, and advanced materials research efforts of university programs with the validation efforts of the AANC. This center will work with industry in a comprehensive effort to improve the safety of aging aircraft. Of the total funds provided, the Committee directs that $4,400,000 be used to further the engine titanium inspection component of this line item. SYSTEM SECURITY TECHNOLOGY Objectives: To enhance the security of passengers and crews in all aspects of aircraft, airports, and related ATC facilities by developing systems that prevent or deter terrorist activities. Explosives and weapons detection .--The Committee has provided $37,450,000 for the explosives and weapons detection line item. This activity is used to conduct research in trace and bulk detection of explosives and cargo screening. This is $1,250,000 more than the administration's request, and the Committee notes that it is in addition to $197,600,000 for airport security improvements, including research and development and placement of existing systems in airports, included in the Omnibus Consolidated Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 1997. To date, the FAA has certified only one explosives detection system [EDS] for use in airports. The Committee believes that FAA's R,E&D efforts to identify and develop alternative technologies are very important. The Committee believes that a new technology using a neutron probe, which determines the number and ratio of atoms of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen in small volumes throughout a suitcase and uses that information to identify contraband substances such as explosives and drugs, has potential worth further exploration. Therefore, the Committee has included an additional $1,250,000 in this line item to continue development of this technology. HUMAN FACTORS AND AVIATION MEDICINE Objectives: To establish ways to improve the effectiveness of human performance in the operation of the aviation system and to seek better methods for preventing human error, accidents, and incidents. ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY Objectives: To protect the environment, conserve energy, and keep the U.S. air transportation industry strong and competitive. INNOVATIVE/COOPERATIVE RESEARCH Objectives: To maximize the total effectiveness of research, engineering, and development by incorporating the efforts of other Government agencies, the industry, and universities. GRANTS-IN-AID FOR AIRPORTS (Liquidation of Contract Authorization) (Airport and Airway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1997 $1,500,000,000 Budget estimate, 1998 1,500,000,000 Committee recommendation 1,600,000,000 The Airport and Airway Improvement Act of 1982, as amended, authorizes a program of grants to fund airport planning and development and noise compatibility planning and projects for public use airports in all States and territories. The Committee recommends $1,600,000,000 in liquidating cash for grants-in-aid for airports. This is consistent with the Committee's obligation limitation on airport grants for fiscal year 1998 and for the payment of previous years' obligations. GRANTS-IN-AID FOR AIRPORTS (Airport and Airway Trust Fund) (Limitation on Obligations) Limitation, 1997 $1,460,000,000 Budget estimate, 1998 1,000,000,000 Committee recommendation 1,700,000,000 The bill also includes a limitation on obligations for airport development and planning grants which are financed under contract authority. The limitation recommended for fiscal year 1998 is $1,700,000,000. This is $700,000,000--70 percent--above the budget request. The recommended amount is intended to be sufficient to continue the important tasks of enhancing airport safety, ensuring that airport standards can be met, maintaining existing airport capacity, and developing additional capacity. The Committee is concerned that the administration's request for the AIP program reflects an under appreciation of the importance of airports to the national aviation system or an under appreciation of the importance of Federal grant funding to the maintenance and improvement of those airports. The level that the Committee has proposed will mean more money for airports in all the States. The table below shows estimates of the entitlement and State allocation grant funds that each State would receive under the administration proposal and the recommendation of the Committee. This does not include discretionary funds, which would also be greater under the Committee recommendation. AIRPORT IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM FORMULA DISTRIBUTIONS [Estimated fiscal year 1998 entitlement and State allocations] State Total formula funds at Formula funds $1.7 $1 billion $1.7 billion $1.0 billion Alabama $11,004,479 $6,682,682 $4,321,796 Alaska 44,350,159 24,998,463 19,351,697 Arizona 19,095,831 11,929,955 7,165,876 Arkansas 8,029,555 4,794,814 3,234,741 California 83,851,933 54,213,702 29,638,231 Colorado 19,235,928 12,231,967 7,003,961 Connecticut 5,417,951 3,304,385 2,113,566 Delaware 517,703 224,865 292,838 District of Columbia 381,786 165,829 215,957 Florida 41,243,479 27,217,140 14,026,340 Georgia 28,167,195 18,806,335 9,360,860 Hawaii 18,488,484 13,357,783 5,130,701 Idaho 8,997,222 5,371,466 3,625,755 Illinois 26,022,923 16,297,124 9,725,799 Indiana 10,790,020 6,444,012 4,346,008 Iowa 10,188,732 6,268,337 3,920,395 Kansas 8,377,939 4,651,680 3,726,259 Kentucky 11,686,785 7,407,296 4,279,489 Louisiana 11,790,052 7,273,937 4,516,115 Maine 5,971,057 3,731,383 2,239,674 Maryland 6,916,271 4,041,803 2,874,468 Massachusetts 11,673,389 7,358,121 4,315,268 Michigan 24,610,408 15,151,917 9,458,491 Minnesota 13,885,156 8,301,942 5,583,215 Mississippi 8,224,316 4,960,326 3,263,990 Missouri 14,398,722 8,759,167 5,639,554 Montana 12,183,371 6,942,332 5,241,039 Nebraska 9,190,478 5,485,990 3,704,488 Nevada 12,279,032 7,408,488 4,870,544 New Hampshire 3,125,629 1,977,388 1,148,241 New Jersey 11,074,394 6,604,424 4,469,969 New Mexico 9,732,441 5,325,934 4,406,506 New York 37,153,530 23,327,631 13,825,899 North Carolina 25,025,635 16,539,422 8,486,212 North Dakota 6,346,247 3,650,213 2,696,034 Ohio 17,935,169 10,605,152 7,330,017 Oklahoma 10,147,566 5,990,962 4,156,604 Oregon 12,424,797 7,378,618 5,046,179 Pennsylvania 28,715,422 18,352,654 10,362,768 Rhode Island 3,765,662 2,574,237 1,191,425 South Carolina 11,419,406 7,366,023 4,053,383 South Dakota 6,749,110 3,853,858 2,895,252 Tennessee 12,297,112 7,609,298 4,687,814 Texas 75,232,235 48,875,751 26,356,484 Utah 8,675,888 4,981,011 3,694,877 Vermont 2,245,261 1,426,717 818,543 Virginia 18,292,784 11,786,080 6,506,704 Washington 15,956,001 9,945,725 6,010,275 West Virginia 5,675,992 3,537,287 2,138,706 Wisconsin 13,976,575 8,535,261 5,441,315 Wyoming 8,266,749 4,760,942 3,505,807 -------------- -------------- ------------- Total 831,203,960 518,787,831 312,416,129 Note.--States allocation includes: General aviation, reliever, and nonprimary commercial service airports and is based on 1997 distribution. Entitlement funds are those distributed to commercial service airports based on enplanements. Estimates are based on 1996 enplanements. The Committee notes that a sizable alternative source of funding is now available to airports in the form of passenger facility charges [PFC's]. The first PFC charge began for airlines tickets issued on June 1, 1992. DOT data shows that as of January 1, 1997, 262 airports have been approved for collection of PFC's in the amount of $14,000,000,000. During calendar year 1996, airports collected $1,050,000,000 in PFC charges and $1,080,000,000 is estimated to be collected in calendar year 1997. Of the airports collecting PFC's, over 20 percent collected about 85 percent of the total, and all of these are either large or medium hub airports. DOT estimates that airports will collect more than $900,000,000 in calendar year 1998, depending on the number of applications received and approved. While large hubs collected most of the PFC funds during the last 2 years, small airports also benefited from these collections because of the redistribution mechanism in the PFC legislation. According to the provision, an airport collecting PFC's must have its apportionment under the AIP grant program reduced by 50 percent of the forecast PFC revenue, but the reduction cannot be more than one-half of the airport's earned apportionment for that fiscal year. FAA then redistributes these returned trust funds primarily to small airports. For example, in fiscal 1997 $123,000,000 that would have been distributed as grants based on passenger enplanements to PFC-charging airports is being redistributed to small airports. In redistributing these funds, FAA provides three-quarters of the total to the small airport fund, another 12.5 percent is available to small hubs, and the remaining 12.5 percent goes to FAA's discretionary account that can be provided to small, medium, or large airports. AIP FUNDING FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998 Budget estimate Committee recommendation Appropriation limitation $1,000,000,000 $1,700,000,000 Entitlements: 392,445,465 531,483,478 ----------------- -------------------------- Subtotal entitlements 620,047,886 961,022,664 ================= ========================== Returned entitlements: Small airport fund 70,129,936 94,976,005 Discretionary set-asides: 20,830,466 200,000,000 Other discretionary: 205,961,690 271,978,781 ----------------- -------------------------- Subtotal other discretionary 286,303,910 378,467,709 ================= ========================== Total entitlement 620,047,886 961,022,664 Total discretionary 379,952,114 738,977,336 ----------------- -------------------------- Grand total 1,000,000,000 1,700,000,000 DISCRETIONARY GRANTS As the table above illustrates, the administration's proposed level of $1,000,000,000 for AIP grants would mean a very small amount of discretionary grant funds--about $380,000,000, compared to about $555,000,000 in the current fiscal year. At a level of $1,700,000,000 for the total AIP program, as recommended by the Committee, there is a 94-percent increase in discretionary funds--to almost $740,000,000. At this level, the authorization legislation would normally cause a transfer from the other discretionary programs--specifically, the discretionary account for capacity, safety, security, and noise and the remaining discretionary funds, which are critical in meeting commitments under letters of intent and advancing projects that have systemwide benefits--to the set-asides for noise, the military airport program, and a set-aside for general aviation, reliever, and nonprimary commercial airports. The latter category provides additional funds for airports that are most dependent on Federal assistance to make safety and capacity improvements. But, without caps, the set-asides for noise and the military airport program would increase to more than $239,000,000 and $65,290,000, respectively. Those would represent increases of two-thirds and one-half, respectively, over the set-asides for these purposes in the current fiscal year. In the Committee's judgment, a cap on the transfer to these two set-asides would result in a better allocation of resources to meet the airport capital investment needs that most impact air travelers today. Therefore, the Committee has recommended bill language that caps the noise set-aside at $200,000,000 and the military airport set-aside at $26,000,000. The Committee has carefully considered a broad array of discretionary grant requests that can be expected in fiscal year 1998. Since there would have been so little discretionary funds under the administration's request to meet these anticipated needs and the Committee's recommendation would significantly increase that amount, the Committee expects the Administrator to give great deference to the Committee's recommendations for discretionary grants in fiscal year 1998. Specifically, the Committee expects the FAA to give priority consideration to grant applications for the projects listed below in the categories of discretionary grants for which they are eligible. If funds in the remaining discretionary category are used for any projects in fiscal year 1998 that are not listed below, the Committee expects that they will be for projects for which FAA has issued letters of intent (including letters of intent the Committee recommends below that the FAA issue), or for projects that will produce significant aviation safety improvements or significant improvements in systemwide capacity or otherwise have a very high benefit/cost ratio and for which the Administrator has provided documentation of such improvements or high benefit/cost ratio to the Senate and House Committees on Appropriations at least 30 days before grant award. Abbeville Municipal Airport, AL .--Abbeville has several major corporations employing thousands of people located in close proximity to the Abbeville Municipal Airport, which is in such disrepair that it is almost unusable. These corporations all have their own private jets and need a facility close by for their senior management and for their middle management teams from other regions to be able to get to the plants quickly for inspection and management. The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to requests for discretionary funding for projects to bring the airport up to FAA standards for private aircraft. These projects will help keep current industries from relocating and will help attract new industry. Austin Straubel International Airport, WI .--Runway and airfield pavements at Austin Straubel Airport in Green Bay, WI, are exhibiting various types of distress beyond the point where routine maintenance can control foreign object debris. In 1996, the Wisconsin DOT Bureau of Aeronautics recommended immediate attention to this problem in order to maintain a level of serviceability and safety commensurate with Austin Straubel's importance to the region and the State. The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to a request for discretionary funds for pavement repair. Birmingham International Airport, AL .--The Committee notes that improvements planned at Birmingham International Airport will improve airport capacity and safety. A passenger facility charge [PFC] was recently approved to fund the rebuild of runway 5/23, but the planned improvements will require more funds than the PFC and Airport Improvement Program [AIP] entitlement grants to the airport will provide. The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to grant requests for runway, taxiway, and apron improvements at the airport and for construction of a new perimeter road to reduce the number of vehicles crossing runways and taxiways and enhance safety. Broome County Airport, NY .--The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to requests for discretionary funding for renovations of the terminal building. City of Inglewood, CA--Darby/Dixon noise mitigation .--Located 2 miles from Los Angeles International Airport and beneath the landing and approaches for the airport's north and south runways, the city of Inglewood has pursued an aggressive noise mitigation strategy for many years. In those neighborhoods suffering from aircraft noise, the city has removed blighted housing and cleared the sites for more compatible commercial and industrial developments. The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to requests for discretionary funding to purchase 284 units in the Darby/Dixon neighborhood and relocate the tenants to safe and decent housing to make way for new commercial development. Colorado Springs Airport, CO .--The Colorado Springs Airport continues to be the fastest growing airport in the United States. The airport, which shares its facilities with several military installations including Peterson Air Force Base, has experienced more than a 210-percent increase in passenger use since March 1995. With the advent of a new carrier, Western Pacific Airlines, and the expansion of other major carrier services, growth continues to skyrocket. Because of this tremendous growth, however, the Colorado Springs Airport is functioning far beyond its intended capacity. Numerous improvements are now needed to ensure the airport's functionality and safety. The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to requests for discretionary funding for construction of taxiway ``C,'' completion of taxiway ``H,'' rehabilitation of taxiway ``A,'' and completion of taxiway ``F.'' The Committee believes these projects would be an effective use of funds and will provide significant benefits to the Nation's aviation system. Dane County Regional Airport, WI .--New runway 3/21 at Dane County Regional Airport is a critical noise reduction measure for the high density residential areas of the city of Madison, WI. Runway 3/21 will direct aircraft overflights away from the heavily populated areas south of the airport and increase the safety of aircraft operations. The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to a request for discretionary funds, which will leverage other financing for the project, which includes land acquisition, construction management, preparation of plans and specifications, environmental mitigation and construction of runway 3/21 and associated taxiways. Dona County Airport, NM .---The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to requests for discretionary funding to widen taxiways and throat area, install highly elevated lights that would illuminate the ramp area, and to pave the parking area. These projects would allow the Dona County Airport facility to support full scale intermodal activity. Fairbanks International Airport, AK .--Fairbanks International Airport is a key international refueling point for international cargo and other flights. The airport needs improvements in a number of areas to be able to continue to serve international and domestic air travel demand. The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to requests for discretionary funding for access ramps, terminal modernization, taxiways, and runway expansions. Global Transpark Airport, NC .--The Global Transpark, an integrated industrial and multimodal transportation and distribution facility in eastern North Carolina, needs to expand its runway to meet the cargo demands at the facility. The State has committed funds to the project, and the Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to a request for discretionary funds to support the runway expansion. Greater Orlando Aviation Authority, Florida .--The Committee directs priority consideration for planned improvements to Greater Orlando Airport, one of the fastest growing airports in the country. Gulfport-Biloxi Regional Airport, MS .--The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to requests for discretionary funding to upgrade and provide improvements to a runway at Gulfport-Biloxi Regional Airport in cooperation with the Air National Guard, which will provide military construction funding as its share of improvements required to serve commercial air service and Air National Guard training at the airport. Hancock International Airport, Syracuse, NY .--The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to requests for discretionary funding for a parallel runway and for drainage improvements. Huntsville International Airport, AL .--A 1996 update to the Huntsville International Airport master plan provides a blueprint for orderly development of an airport cited by the FAA as one of four potential new connecting hubs and the only one of the four in the Southeast United States. A major component of the master plan update is a land acquisition program of undeveloped property designed to protect the airport from encroachment by incompatible land uses and position the airport to take advantage of future development opportunities. The Huntsville-Madison County Airport Authority proceeded with the planned land acquisition and then sought FAA approval to impose and use PFC revenues for reimbursement of the land acquisition costs, in addition to other uses. The Committee was disappointed by FAA's determination that this reimbursement was not eligible for use of PFC revenues. In view of the impact of this determination on the airport's development plans, the Committee expects the FAA to give priority consideration to any future land acquisition efforts and any discretionary grant requests for development projects at the airport that are included in the master plan update. Jackson Municipal Airport, MS .--The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to a request for discretionary funding to construct phase 1 of additional apron to accommodate international and domestic air cargo service at a new air cargo park. LaCrosse Municipal Airport, WI .--The Committee understands that the primary runway 18/36 at LaCrosse Municipal Airport has exceeded its useful life and is showing signs of serious deterioration. The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to a request for discretionary funds to reconstruct the runway as soon as possible so that there is minimum disruption to the airport's regularly scheduled airline traffic. Lancaster Airport, PA .--The Lancaster Airport is in the bottom 20 percent of air carrier airports in terms of air carrier runway length. The main runway lacks 1,000-foot extended runway safe areas (overruns) which are required by FAA safety standards. The runway length limits most corporate aircraft to 60 percent of their useful loads and results in diversions to alternate airports in adverse weather. The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to a request for discretionary funds for the necessary work to extend the runway in order to improve safety and economic growth and reduce airport noise impacts. Laughlin/Bullhead Airport, NV .--The Committee is aware that the leveling of a hillside bordering the current runway and expansion of the runway will facilitate the arrival and departure of larger aircraft and thereby provide the airlines the opportunity to transport the rapidly growing number of tourists and visitors to the Laughlin/Bullhead City area. The Committee directs the FAA to give this project priority consideration. Lexington Airport, NC .--The airport is in the midst of a $14,000,000 plan to build a new airport on the site of the old facility. The new runway will cross the old runway and will thus necessitate the closure of the airport during construction that is expected to last for 1 year. The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to requests for discretionary funds to accelerate construction and shorten the period during which the airport will be closed. Long Island-MacArthur Airport, NY .--The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to requests for discretionary funding for an apron expansion in the area south of the west concourse. Manistee Blacker Airport, MI .--The Committee is recommending that the FAA seriously consider installing an instrument landing system [ILS] at the Manistee Blacker Airport in northern Michigan to improve the reliability of air service to that community. The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to requests for discretionary funding for land acquisition for installation of the ILS and construction of a parallel runway. Mesquite Airport, NV .--The Committee is aware that the Clark County, NV, Department of Aviation is conducting a site selection, airport master plan and an environmental assessment for a commercial airport to be located near Mesquite, NV. While this work was initiated in fiscal year 1997, the Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to a request for discretaionary funding to reimburse the Clark County Department of Aviation for these studies. Montgomery County Airport Authority, Pennsylvania .--Montgomery County, PA, has established an airport authority to acquire and improve Wings Field, a private airport in the Philadelphia metropolitan area. The airport operates over 42,000 flights each year and is rapidly expanding. The airport is vital to regional economic development and relied upon by local businesses. The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to requests for discretionary grant funding to expand Wings Field. Ogden-Hinckley Airport, UT .--Ogden-Hinckley serves as the primary reliever and weather divert for Salt Lake City International Airport. The Committee continues to urge the FAA, as it has in past years, to give priority consideration to requests for discretionary funding for the upgrade of terminal facilities at Ogden-Hinckley Municipal Airport to meet the security needs of passengers in fulfilling its role as a weather divert destination and to prepare the facility for the transportation needs associated with the 2002 Winter Olympics. Oxford/University Airport, Oxford, MS .--There is a serious safety concern at the Oxford/University Airport as it strains to meet growing traffic demands with increasingly outdated equipment. The airport is in need of a new terminal building and the relocation of fuel tanks that in their present location represent a potential safety concern. The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to a request for discretionary funding to upgrade the airport's facilities and meet modern safety requirements. Pittsburgh International Airport, PA .--The Committee is aware that Pittsburgh International Airport has been required to spend most of its AIP entitlement funds to repair airport pavement because of deteriorating conditions and that additional funds are needed for the airport to continue its progress and to maintain excellent service. The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to requests for funds for replacement vehicles while existing people mover cars are being repaired and modified, for related improvements to the airside and landside people mover stations, and for conversion of a portion of an existing ramp to a taxilane and connection to taxiway N, which would provide a connection between the present Airside Business Park and the planned air cargo complex. Salt Lake City International Airport, UT .--The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to requests for discretionary funding for the airport modernization program. Sanford-Lee County Airport, NC .--The Committee reiterates the direction it provided last year to the FAA to provide funding to accelerate construction of this new airport, which will serve as a reliever facility for Raleigh-Durham International Airport, to complete construction funding in fiscal years 1998 99. Shelby County Airport, AL .--Shelby County Airport is a designated reliever airport for Birmingham International Airport, but the airport has not been kept up to FAA standards and, with a runway length of 3,800 feet, is not practical for many aircraft, including larger general aviation aircraft. The Shelby County Airport Development Study outlines projects that would bring the airport into compliance with FAA standards and improve facilities so that the airport could accommodate corporate aviation activities and support economic development of the community. The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to grant requests for projects in the study. Southwest Florida International Airport [RSW] .--The Committee is disappointed that the FAA has not provided airport improvement discretionary funds to the Southwest Florida International Airport for its urgently needed capital expansion project. Last year, the Committee noted that RSW was the third fastest growing airport in the country with a growth rate over the past 10 years three times the national average, and recommended that the FAA give priority consideration to this project. However, to date the FAA has not released any funding for this project. The Committee again urges the FAA to provide discretionary funding to RSW and also suggests the FAA consider the merits of entering into a letter of intent with the project sponsor. Standiford Field Airport, Louisville, KY .--The Committee is aware that the FAA has agreed to reimburse Standiford Field Airport for the purchase of the category III instrument landing system [ILS] for runway 35R. Further, FAA has indicated the costs associated with this project are eligible under the AIP program. The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to reimbursement of the airport for the appropriate share of costs for the ILS. Waynesboro Municipal Airport, MS .--A 10-year airport improvement program is underway at Waynesboro Municipal Airport. The required environmental studies have been prepared, and local funds have been obtained for right-of-way acquisition. The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to requests for discretionary funding to support continuation of the airport's improvement program, including earthwork and site preparation for a project to lengthen and widen a runway. Westchester County Airport, NY .--The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to requests for discretionary funding for parallel taxiway phase 3. Williamsport-Lycoming County Airport, PA .--Williamsport Airport, one of the oldest commercial airports in the Nation, is the transportation hub for north-central Pennsylvania and a significant factor in economic development in the region. The Committee directs FAA to give priority consideration to a request for funding of a runway extension and complete pavement overlay for its main instrument runway. A runway extension could substantially improve regional economic development opportunities for north-central Pennsylvania as it would accommodate larger planes for both passenger and cargo purposes. Zanesville Airport, OH .--Ohio has received repeated requests from locally and regionally based industries for upgraded approach procedures and updated air navigation facilities. The recent increase in jet-powered operations demands improved course guidance and vertical guidance establishing and maintaining the aircraft's horizontal and vertical approach/descend direction. The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to requests for discretionary funding for construction, engineering, and administration to install a non-Federal localizer and a non-Federal glide slope. LETTERS OF INTENT Congress authorized FAA to use letters of intent [LOI's] to fund multiyear airport improvement projects that will significantly enhance systemwide airport capacity. FAA is also to consider a project's benefits and costs in determining whether to approve it for AIP funding. FAA adopted a policy of committing to LOI's no more than about 50 percent of forecasted AIP discretionary funds allocated for capacity, safety, security, and noise projects. The Committee viewed this policy as reasonable because it gave FAA the flexibility to fund other worthy projects that do not fall under a LOI. Both FAA and airport authorities have found letters of intent helpful in planning and funding airport development. The Committee appreciates the complexity of assessing a project's impact on systemwide capacity but believes that FAA should do its best in this regard before committing future AIP funds under a LOI. The Committee in the past was concerned that FAA had not exercised sufficient control over the use of LOI's. Accordingly, to maintain program integrity and ensure LOI commitments are met, the Committee repeats its recommendation that FAA be granted the authority to award new LOI's only after scheduled and recommended LOI payments fall to less than 50 percent of AIP discretionary funds. Current letters of intent assume the following fiscal year 1998 grant allocations: Arkansas: Northwest Arkansas $3,500,000 California: Sacramento Metropolitan 9,200,000 Colorado: Denver International 29,911,000 Georgia: Savannah International 1,465,000 Illinois: 14,000,000 1,000,000 Kentucky: 11,593,000 16,300,000 Louisiana: New Orleans International 9,147,000 Michigan: Detroit Metropolitan 16,160,000 Mississippi: Golden Triangle Regional 400,000 Nevada: Reno Cannon International 6,500,000 New York: Greater Buffalo International 1,700,000 Rhode Island: Theodore F. Green State 6,500,000 South Carolina: 532,000 400,000 Tennessee: 2,180,000 13,790,000 Texas: 11,321,000 12,500,000 1,327,000 Virginia: 4,463,000 13,249,000 187,639,000 Two sources exist to fund FAA's commitment to an airport's LOI. One is the discretionary portion of FAA's airport improvement program appropriation, and the other is the entitlement funding that an airport receives through the AIP on the basis of its passenger enplanements. Even though FAA expects an airport receiving an LOI to put all of its entitlement funding toward the project being funded by the LOI, this source provides only about one-quarter of the annual LOI funding. Thus, of the $187,600,000 that FAA has committed to LOI's during fiscal year 1998, the Committee estimates that approximately $142,700,000 will need to come from the AIP's discretionary limitation. As shown in the preceding AIP funding chart, the Committee recommended level would provide sufficient discretionary funding to cover LOI's; however, little flexibility is left to fund other high-priority capacity projects not included under an LOI. The Committee directs FAA to provide a current report to the Senate and House Transportation Appropriations Subcommittees by September 1, 1997, of expected allocations of fiscal year 1998 AIP grant funds, broken out by entitlement and discretionary and category within discretionary, for existing LOI's. Applications are pending for capacity enhancement projects which would, if constructed, significantly reduce congestion and delay. These projects require multiyear funding commitments. The Committee recommends that the FAA enter into letters of intent for multiyear funding of such capacity enhancement projects. Consistent with the constraints outlined above, the Committee provides the following guidance to the FAA with respect to future LOI's. Anchorage International Airport, AK .--The airport has plans to develop a new air cargo facility with private funds in response to growing domestic and international cargo activity. The plans are dependent on other surface improvements at the airport. Other improvements are planned to meet expected growth in passenger traffic over the next 20 years. The Committee urges the FAA to issue an LOI to support these planned improvements if requested by the airport sponsor. Memphis International Airport, TN .--The Memphis Airport serves as a hub of operations for both Federal Express and Northwest Airlines, and it serves as both a major employer and as an economic center of the region. Reconstruction and extension to international runway length of runway 18C/36C is planned beginning in the latter half of calendar year 1997 and will bring benefits to the whole midsouth region and increase fees collected not only by the U.S. Customs, but also the FAA and the U.S. Treasury. Of the total project cost, $59,827,500 is eligible for AIP funding. The Committee urges the FAA to issue an LOI for reconstruction and extension of runway 18C/36C. New Orleans International Airport, LA .--The Committee reiterates its recommendation from last year that the FAA consider signing an LOI for a new parallel north/south runway at the New Orleans International Airport [NOIA]. The Committee recognizes the present and future traffic demands in the Louisiana/Mississippi region and the anticipated increase in traffic due to cargo traffic related to international trade which the proposed runway would accommodate. The Committee is advised that, over the past year, NOIA has moved to complete reports required under the National Environmental Policy Act and is prepared to move to financing of the project. The airport has projected substantial investment savings over the 30-year life of the runway. The Committee has again recognized the substantial savings that would result from the completion of this new parallel runway and the importance of NOIA as an intermodal center of commerce. Philadelphia International Airport, PA .--The Committee urges the FAA to issue an LOI for the vital runway construction project at Philadelphia International Airport. Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, WA .--The Committee understands that applications from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport are pending at the FAA for capacity enhancement projects, which would, if constructed, significantly reduce congestion and delay. These projects require multiyear funding commitments. The Committee recommends that the FAA enter into LOI's for multiyear funding of such capacity enhancement projects. The Committee understands that an application for an LOI is pending for construction of a new dependent runway for Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. The Committee recommends the FAA enter into an LOI with the project sponsor for construction of the runway project. GRANTS-IN-AID FOR AIRPORTS (Airport and Airway Trust Fund) (Rescission of Contract Authorization) The Committee recommends rescission of $286,000,000 in contract authority that is not available due to annual limits on obligations. GENERAL PROVISIONS Debt forgiveness .--The Committee has included a general provision (sec. 334) that would forgive the State of Hawaii from any obligation to repay $30,000,000 that it had previously diverted from airport revenues and paid to the Office of Hawaiian Affairs for claims related to native Hawaiian lands. The 1959 Federal legislation admitting Hawaii to the United States established a public trust, consisting of the lands formerly held by the Republic of Hawaii. This trust is to be used for the betterment of the conditions of native Hawaiians. Substantial portions of Hawaii's airports are built on these public trust lands. In furtherance of the trust purposes, the State of Hawaii has used a portion of airport revenues for programs aimed at the betterment of native Hawaiians. Federal aviation law, however, prohibits the diversion of airport revenues for nonairport purposes. Recently, the Department of Transportation Inspector General identified $30,000,000 in past payments to the Office of Hawaiian Affairs as illegal diversions of airport revenues. The FAA agreed with the OIG's determination. However, it is unclear whether a Federal court would agree with the OIG and the FAA should their determination be challenged. Given the fact that the State of Hawaii owns the lands in trust for the betterment of native Hawaiians, it is conceivable that a reviewing court could find that the payments of airport revenues were in that nature of rent, which is a permissible use of airport revenue. To put this issue to rest, the general provision provides that the State of Hawaii is forgiven any obligation to repay past amounts diverted for trust purposes, in return for a clear congressional statement prohibiting any future diversions. The original language was broadened at the request of the authorizing committee to include forgiveness of past diversions previously received by native Hawaiians, native Americans, or Native Alaskans in order to afford all parties who are similarly situated to have an equal opportunity to be forgiven past debts. There are instances of airport revenue diversion involving the State of Hawaii, in addition to the past payment of airport revenues to the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Regarding one such issue, the State has repaid the principal of $64,000,000 to the State airport revenue fund. The interest on the $64,000,000, however, remains outstanding, and the payment terms remain unresolved. The Committee understands that the State of Hawaii, the Federal Aviation Administration, and the Department of Transportation Office of Inspector General are working together to resolve this issue. The Committee encourages these parties to continue to work together diligently to develop a repayment plan for the State that comports with the applicable statutory and regulatory requirements and guidelines that are administered by the Federal Aviation Administration. Closure of airports .--Richards-Gebaur Memorial Airport, located in Kansas City, MO, and Bader Field in Atlantic City, NJ, are subject to Surplus Property Act and grant assurance restrictions requiring the airports to remain public airports. The city of Kansas City expended substantial funds to maintain the facility at Richards-Gebaur Memorial Airport and to develop and promote that facility for use by a variety of aircraft. After many years of such efforts and the expenditure of funds, the number of operations at the airport remains inadequate to support continued retention of the facility as a public airport. The city has determined that the highest and best use of the property would be for redevelopment as an intermodal transportation facility for freight distribution and processing. Conversion of the facility for such transportation uses would capitalize on Kansas City's geographic location and on the strength of the city's major rail and trucking industries, and enhance the growing trade relationships between the United States and Mexico under the North American Free Trade Agreement. In order to accomplish this redevelopment, closure of the airport is required. The Committee finds that such closure would benefit civil aviation and would produce an equal or greater benefit to the national transportation system including the overall air transportation system. The Kansas City airport system would be benefited and enhanced by allowing the deployment of the city's aviation funds for more productive use at its other better-utilized airports. The Committee also understands that closure of Richards-Gebaur will have no adverse impact on civil aviation by reason of the fact that there are 13 airports geographically proximate to Richards-Gebaur, including 8 airports located within 20 miles of the facility which can easily absorb Richards-Gebaur's current and projected demand. Atlantic City Muni Bader Field Airport, located in Atlantic City, NJ, is subject to restrictions imposed by grant assurances and memorandums of understanding requiring the airport to remain viable and operational until the year 2006, or until a mutually agreed upon date and conditions. Despite the city's ongoing investments to ensure that the airport is well maintained for general aviation use, the airport cannot retain an adequate level of operations to justify the continued investments. Because the airport is seriously underutilized, the city has determined that an airport is not the best use for the property and is pursuing other options for economic development of the property. The Committee understands that, given the proximity of Bader Field to other airports in the region, such as Atlantic City International Airport, nearby county airports and State-owned airports, civil aviation will not be negatively affected. The Committee includes a provision (sec. 337) authorizing the FAA to: grant requests from Kansas City to close Richards-Gebaur Memorial Airport and from Atlantic City to close Bader Field as public airports; release and cancel any terms, conditions, reservations, or restrictions contained in any surplus property conveyance/transfer documents and any sponsor conditions or assurances contained in any FAA grant agreements or orders; and allow closure of the airports and their conversion to nonaeronautical uses. Seating configuration .--The Committee is including a provision (sec. 332) clarifying the definition of ``passenger capacity of 56 persons or less,'' under section 29(a)(2) of the International Air Transportation Competition Act of 1979 to include any operations with any aircraft configured or reconfigured with 56 passengers or less except for widebody aircraft in excess of 363,000 pounds gross aircraft weight. In no event shall the total number of passenger seats installed on any aircraft operating under this exemption exceed 56. Nothing in this provision should be construed to prohibit the operation, or apply to the operation, of regional jets originally configured with 56 or less seats out of Love Field. The Department of Transportation has stated that regional jets may be utilized under section 29(a)(2) of the International Air Transportation Competition Act to serve any destination outside of Texas and its bordering States. Accordingly, this provision confirms that authority to utilize regional jets in scheduled service from Love Field to any destination and does not allow the Dallas City Council to prohibit such service. AIRCRAFT PURCHASE LOAN GUARANTEE PROGRAM The bill includes a zero obligation limitation on borrowings during fiscal year 1998 under the aircraft purchase loan guarantee program. The administration requested authority to obligate up to $5,000 to cover administrative costs associated with outstanding loans. The bill, instead, provides authority within the operations account to use up to $5,000 for such expenses. FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION SUMMARY OF FISCAL YEAR 1998 PROGRAM The principal missions of the Federal Highway Administration are: administration, in cooperation with the States, of the Federal-aid Highway Construction Program, including the Interstate, National Highway System, bridge, and surface transportation programs; regulation and enforcement of Federal requirements relating to the safety of operation and equipment of commercial motor carriers engaged in interstate or foreign commerce; and governing the safety in movement over the Nation's highways of dangerous cargoes such as explosives, flammables, and other hazardous material. Under the Committee recommendation, a total program level of $23,582,900,000 would be provided for the activities of the Federal Highway Administration for fiscal year 1998. The following table summarizes the fiscal year 1997 program levels, the fiscal year 1998 budget estimates, the House allowance, and the Committee's recommendations: [In thousands of dollars] Program Fiscal year 1997 program level Fiscal year 1998 budget estimate Committee recommendations Limitation on general operating expenses\1\ (521,114) (494,376) (558,440) Appalachian development highway system\2\ 300,000 Federal-aid highways\3\ 18,933,630 20,170,000 21,800,000 Exempt Federal-aid obligations 2,023,000 1,510,331 1,390,600 Emergency relief appropriation 650,000,000 State infrastructure banks 150,000 150,000 Infrastructure credit 100,000 Right-of-way revolving fund 8,000 Motor carrier safety grants\4\ 78,225 100,000 84,300 Motor carrier safety\5\ (49,000) (52,765) (51,245) -------------------------------- ---------------------------------- --------------------------- Total 21,834,855 22,030,331 23,582,900 \1\Excludes reductions pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. \2\The administration proposed $200,000,000 in contract authority for this program under Federal-aid highways as part of ISTEA reauthorization. \3\Obligation limitation on contract authority. Also includes estimated additional obligation limitation pursuant to section 1002(f)(1) of Public Law 102 240. Excludes $46,561,000 for research and technology, which is included in exempt obligations. \4\Obligation limitation on contract authority. \5\Included within limitation on general operating expenses. LIMITATION ON GENERAL OPERATING EXPENSES Appropriations, 1997\1\ $521,114,000 Budget estimate, 1998 494,376,000 Committee recommendation 558,440,000 \1\Excludes reductions for TASC and awards pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. The limitation on general operating expenses controls spending for virtually all the salaries, expenses, and research and development programs of the Federal Highway Administration. The Committee recommends that a limitation of $558,440,000 be provided for salaries and expenses of the Federal Highway Administration. The following table reflects the Committee's recommendation and that requested by the administration. [In thousands of dollars] Program Fiscal year 1998 budget estimate Committee recommendation Administrative expenses 261,258 261,258 Motor carrier safety 52,765 51,245 Contract programs: 73,903 62,737 Accountwide adjustment ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Total limitation 494,376 558,440 MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY OPERATIONS The Committee recommends $51,245,000 for motor carrier safety operations, not including the funding of $7,400,000 for research which is included in the research, development, and technology line. This is an increase of $2,245,000 above the 1997 enacted level, but $1,520,000 less than requested. The Committee's recommended funding level represents the following changes to the administration's request: Federal/industry training -$1,220,000 Outreach -300,000 Federal/industry training .--The Committee denies funding for the new Federal/training initiative and notes that the Office of Motor Carriers [OMC] has previously allocated funds for various training initiatives within its base programmatic funds. FHWA staff formerly of the ICC are available to train OMC field staff on regulations issued pursuant to the Interstate Commerce Commission Termination Act of 1995. FHWA's videoconferencing facilities are also available for this training. When final regulations are issued to implement the results of the zero-based review, the Committee will reconsider the need for additional training materials, especially to assist small businesses. The Committee has denied funding for industry training because it does not want to duplicate similar training activities already conducted by the private sector. The Committee directs the Associate Administrator for Motor Carriers to ensure that none of the FTE reductions shall be taken from the field staff, especially motor carrier safety specialist positions. The Committee's allowance includes $500,000 for the OMC to expand and improve its no-zone campaign and other activities intended to reduce the contribution of the public to commercial vehicle crashes. Outreach .--The Committee has not included funding for reauthorization workshops which can be conducted as part of other motor carrier conferences and meetings. HIGHWAY RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND TECHNOLOGY The Committee recommends a total of $62,737,000 to be distributed as follows: [In thousands of dollars] Activity/program element Program level, 1997 Budget estimate, 1998 Committee recommendation Highway research and development: 8,650 9,000 9,500 --------------------- ----------------------- -------------------------- Total, highway research and development 67,124 73,903 62,737 Safety .--The Committee recommends $9,500,000 for safety research and development. The FHWA request continues safety research into a range of areas. The Committee notes the increased focus by the FHWA on the interactive highway safety design model. Within the driver module that will contain profiles of a range of driver types to be combined with various design vehicles, the Committee encourages the FHWA to draw on the existing outside expertise and provide a demonstration of technologies and practices to improve the driving performance of elderly drivers and other distinct user groups identified in the module. An additional $500,000 has been provided for this purpose. Pavements .--The Committee recommends $11,150,000 for pavements research and development. Structures .--The Committee recommends $15,256,000 for structures research and development. The Committee recognizes that an estimated 42 percent of the Nation's bridges are structurally deficient and the cost to correct these deficiencies is in excess of $90,000,000,000. The Committee directs the Federal Highway Administration to pursue research into high performance materials and bridge systems which could be applied to improve safety, function, durability, and renewability with minimal cost and environmental impact; $1,200,000 has been included for this purpose. The Committee believes a unique opportunity to conduct research exists during the Interstate 15 reconstruction project and other transportation projects in the Salt Lake Valley, UT. The research performed during the reconstruction of Interstate 15 and other projects will provide the country with a detailed analysis of the success of the design/build process, seismic retrofitting, and many other valuable areas of research. The Committee strongly recommends that FHWA work with the Utah Transportation Center and give priority consideration to applying research funds as may be necessary for these purposes. Advanced Composites Materials Bridge Demonstration Program .--The Committee is aware that the defense industry has developed a number of advanced, high performance materials for use in various military systems and that civil engineers have found practical applications of this technology in transportation infrastructure as well. These materials proved ideal for aerospace applications because the strength-to-weight ratio is 5 to 10 times higher than aluminum or steel. The motivation for using these advanced composites in bridge systems is their strength and lightweight and resistance to corrosion or fatigue. They are particularly well suited for seismic protection. The Committee directs FHWA to work with an academic and industry-led national consortium and fund with available balances an advanced composite bridge project to demonstrate the applications of an all-composite bridge for civil infrastructure purposes. Environment .--The Committee is recommending $5,666,000 for environment research and development. The San Joaquin Valley of California and surrounding regions exceed both State and Federal clean air standards for small particulate matter. The environment research funds include $100,000 for FHWA's participation in the assessment of methodologies needed for estimating emissions of particulate matter, the sources and composition of particulate matter from roadway construction and heavy truck activity. Last year the Committee directed the Department to initiate a research program to support a comprehensive noise prediction model applicable to highway traffic, aircraft, and railroad noise. The Committee further directed that a grant of $250,000 be made available to the National Center for Physical Acoustics to identify scientific issues which impede accurate noise prediction. The Committee notes that the Department has worked with the National Center for Physical Acoustics to define research priorities and initiate high-priority research toward a multimodal noise prediction model. The Committee directs that this cooperative program be continued in fiscal year 1998 at the same level. Policy .--The Committee recommends $5,400,000 for policy research. This funding is adequate to provide the States with information and tools. Unnecessary data collection and conferences activities should be eliminated. Planning .--The Committee recommends $8,000,000 for planning research. The Committee has included $2,000,000 for an assessment of the Red River corridor transportation infrastructure of the five-State area pursuant to the recommendations of the Northern Great Plains Rural Development Commission established in ISTEA. This assessment will help evaluate whether the corridor has the necessary infrastructure to deliver good to the global marketplace. The assessment should consider the developing trading relationships in the region and should be developed collaboratively with the region's State departments of transportation, metropolitan planning organizations, and representatives of transportation and other business interests in the region. Motor carrier research .--The Committee recommends $7,400,000 for motor carrier research. Within the funds provided, the Committee recommends $500,000 for a study to obtain an estimate of the prevalence of sleep apnea in truckdrivers and to identify and evaluate remedial measures, including screening and detection technologies, for use by motor carriers. The Committee also directs that $500,000 of the funds provided are for an operational test and validation of technological aids to improve fatigue management among commercial truckdrivers. The Committee directs OMC to work with the trucking industry to accomplish these research objectives. INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS The Committee recommends a total of $125,650,000 to be distributed as follows: [In thousands of dollars] Program level, 1997 Budget estimate, 1998 Committee recommendation Intelligent vehicle highway systems: 28,455 33,000 33,000 --------------------- ----------------------- -------------------------- Total, ITS 120,358 54,000 125,650 Research and development .--The Committee recommends a total of $33,000,000 for ITS research and development, consistent with the budget request. The Committee recommends $33,000,000 for continued research in intelligent transportation systems. In addition to these funds, the Department has requested in its surface transportation reauthorization proposal another $196,000,000 in contract authority outside the limitation on general operating expenses. The Committee is aware of recent studies to document the benefits of ITS and encourages the Joint Project Office to continue this work and to submit a report to the Senate and House Committees on Appropriations with the budget justification for fiscal year 1999. The Committee recommends a total of $76,650,000 for operational tests. The funds provided are for the following operational tests: Committee recommendation Southeast Michigan snow and ice management [SEMSIM] $2,300,000 Utah intelligent transportation systems 7,000,000 Kansas City, MO, intermodal common communications techno- logy 2,000,000 Reno, NV, intelligent transportation systems 3,750,000 Yosemite Valley, CA, intelligent transportation system 500,000 Bozeman, MT, Western Transportation Institute 1,500,000 Barboursville-ONA, WV, traffic management 10,000,000 North Dakota State University advanced traffic analysis center 600,000 North Dakota advanced transportation weather information sys- tem 800,000 Sullivan County, NY, emergency weather system 1,000,000 Urban Transportation Safety Systems Center (Philadelphia) 250,000 New York City toll plaza scanners 2,100,000 Cleveland, OH, computer integrated transit maintenance environment project 2,000,000 Santa Teresa, NM, intermodal technology demonstration project\1\ 1,400,000 Operation Respond hazardous materials emergency response software 3,000,000 Washington State radio communication emergency call boxes 750,000 Washington statewide roadway weather information system 2,500,000 Texas DOT ITS research 400,000 Milwaukee MONITOR, and Wisconsin rural ITS 9,200,000 I 95 multistate corridor coalition 2,100,000 Colorado I 25 truck safety improvements 12,000,000 Tuscalosa, AL, traffic integration and flow control 2,200,000 Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission ITS 8,000,000 Alaska cold weather ITS sensing 1,300,000 76,650,000 \1\To be provided for the ATR Institute. Automated highway system .--The budget requested that funding provided for the automated highway systems and crash avoidance programs be from contract authority rather than funds under the limitation on general operating expenses. Accordingly, the Committee defers consideration of this request to the appropriate legislative committees. The Committee supports the action of the Joint Program Office to commission a review of the AHS program and the results of that review should be incorporated into a revised 5-year plan to be submitted to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations. Evaluation .--The Committee recommends $7,000,000 for evaluation and program assessment activities. Mainstreaming .--The Committee has not provided the request of $3,000,000 for mainstreaming. These funds are better spent on operational testing and research and development activities. The Committee defers consideration of the contract authority request to the appropriate legislative committees. A limited ITS mainstreaming program, including technical assistance and outreach would benefit State and local governments. The Department proposes, however, to spend $22,000,000 on such activities. Numerous ITS benefits already are documented as a result of investing in more than 80 operational tests and 11 model deployment projects. These studies, as well as the visits to ITS facilities by State officials already supported by the FHWA, reduce the immediacy of the need for a substantial increase in mainstreaming activities. In addition, the funding requested for training raises questions about the appropriate role of the FHWA vis-a-vis academic institutions and the proposed scholarships to support international travel of non-Federal personnel is not warranted. TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT AND DEPLOYMENT The Committee recommends $14,800,000 for technology assessment and deployment. LOCAL TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM The Committee recommends $4,100,000 for the LTAP. These funds will serve several purposes, including enhancing the participation of the LTAP centers in such areas as improved data collection, traffic safety audits, improved traffic and sign inventory management, improving the technology transfer clearinghouse, facilitating the deployment of proven SHRP technology at the local level, and addressing the technology gap at the State level as compared to state-of-the-art highway technology practices. INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORTATION ACTIVITIES The Committees recommends $2,300,000 for the International Transportation Activities Program. Within the funds provided, the Committee directs that a study be conducted on the potential for establishing, the economic impacts, the potential trade relationships, and the environmental impacts of establishing a roadlink from Wrangell, AK, to the Canadian border along a proposed Bradfield Road alignment. The Committee encourages FHWA to redouble its efforts to find supplemental funding to help accomplish the objectives of this program. The Committee has merged the technical assistance-Russia into the international programs so the Russian program will compete for resources. national advanced driver simulator [nads] The Committee recommends $14,250,000 for NADS. HIGHWAY-RELATED SAFETY GRANTS (liquidation of contract authorization) (Highway trust fund) Appropriations, 1997 ($2,049,000) Budget estimate, 1998 (4,000,000) Committee recommendation (4,000,000) The Highway Related Safety Grant Program assists States and localities in implementing highway safety standards administered by the Federal Highway Administration. These standards cover traffic control devices, highway surveillance, and highway-related aspects of pedestrian safety. APPALACHIAN DEVELOPMENT HIGHWAY SYSTEM The Committee is recommending $300,000,000 for construction of unfinished segments of the Appalachian development highway system [ADHS]. The ADHS connects largely rural, underdeveloped areas in 13 States. Its completion is critical to the economic development of these often-ignored areas. In many cases, the unfinished segments of the ADHS are high-accident locations in the Appalachian States, so the Committee believes continued construction will have a high payoff in highway safety benefits. The Committee intends that the fiscal year 1998 funding for the ADHS will be distributed among the States with unfinished ADHS segments in proportion to each State's share of the remaining cost-to-complete the system as determined by the Appalachian Regional Commission [ARC]. However, the Committee is concerned that this distribution may not necessarily result in construction on the segments with the highest accident experience first. Therefore, the Committee directs the ARC to prepare a report on highway crash experience on the unfinished segments of the ADHS, the extent to which completion of unfinished segments would be likely to lower crash rates, and options for distributing ADHS funds among Appalachian States that might result in a faster reduction of highway-related crashes in these States. The Committee is aware that legislation has been introduced in the Senate and reported to the Committee on Environment and Public Works that would provide sufficient contract authority over the life of the next surface transportation bill to complete the unfinished segments of the ADHS. The Committee on Environment and Public Works also has before it the administration's proposed ISTEA reauthorization legislation, and other legislative proposals, which would provide between $2,000,000,000 and $3,000,000,000 in contract authority over the next 6 years to assist in the completion of the system. The Committee stands in strong support of efforts to include the sums necessary to complete the ADHS as a categorical program to receive contract authority through the reauthorization of ISTEA. The $300,000,000 provided in this bill for the ADHS should be viewed as an effort to expedite the completion of the system and not as a substitute for sums appropriated in the Energy and Water Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 1998 or as a substitute for sums which should be made available as contract authority in upcoming ISTEA reauthorization legislation. FEDERAL-AID HIGHWAYS (Liquidation of Contract Authorization) (Highway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1997 $19,800,000,000 Budget estimate, 1998 19,800,000,000 20,850,000,000 This activity comprises the majority of all federally aided programs through which the States are financially and technically aided to continue a national highway system that meets the transportation needs of the Nation in terms of capacity and safety. All programs included within the Federal-aid account are financed from the highway trust fund. Authorizations in the form of contract authority are enacted in substantive legislation. These authorizations are apportioned and/or allocated to the States and generally remain available for obligation over a 4-year period. Liquidating cash appropriations are subsequently requested to fund outlays resulting from obligations incurred under contract authority. The Committee recommends a liquidating cash appropriation of $20,850,000,000 for the Federal-aid highways program. FEDERAL-AID HIGHWAYS (Limitation on Obligations) (Highway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1997 \1\$18,933,630,000 Budget estimate, 1998 20,170,000,000 Committee recommendation 21,800,000,000 \1\Excludes reductions for TASC and awards pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. Includes limitation available pursuant to section 310 of Public Law 104 205. The administration's proposal of $20,170,000,000 includes previously appropriated or authorized accounts other than emergency relief and minimum allocation. In addition to programs covered by the obligation ceiling, there are activities that are exempt from the ceiling. Under the administration's proposal, it is assumed that $1,510,331,000 is outside the limitation which brings the administration's program total to $21,680,331,000. The Committee recommends an obligation ceiling of $21,800,000,000 for the regular Federal-aid formula program. In addition, the programs outside the obligation ceiling are estimated at $1,390,600,000 for a total program level of $23,190,600,000. COMPARISON OF FEDERAL HIGHWAY TRUST FUND HIGHWAY ACCOUNT RECEIPTS ATTRIBUTABLE TO THE STATES AND FEDERAL-AID APPORTIONMENTS AND ALLOCATIONS FROM THE HIGHWAY ACCOUNT--FISCAL YEARS 1957 96\1\ [Dollars in thousands] State Payments into the fund\2\ Apportionments and allocations from the fund\3\ Ratio of apportionments and allocations to payments Fiscal year 1996 Cumulated since July 1, 1956 Fiscal year 1996 Cumulated since July 1, 1956 Fiscal year 1996 Cumulated since July 1, 1956 Alabama $490,909 $6,298,458 $316,382 $7,012,397 .64 1.11 Alaska 54,785 651,552 216,054 4,372,965 3,94 6.71 Arizona 374,857 4,529,518 246,553 5,431,193 .66 1.20 Arkansas\4\ 323,475 4,202,837 244,959 4,123,582 .76 .98 California 2,199,250 32,995,155 1,524,640 31,388,305 .69 .95 Colorado\4\ 275,808 4,099,483 227,438 5,433,106 .82 1.33 Connecticut 225,127 3,741,434 357,783 6,636,912 1.59 1.77 Delaware 64,854 948,933 77,613 1,421,581 1.20 1.50 District of Columbia 28,480 568,788 83,819 2,375,748 2.94 4.18 Florida\4\ 1,152,284 14,265,018 729,920 12,634,505 .63 .89 Georgia 874,372 10,316,962 484,351 9,525,763 .55 .92 Hawaii 58,505 822,840 117,986 3,160,606 2.02 3.84 Idaho 122,978 1,552,901 129,936 2,714,224 1.06 1.75 Illinois\4\ 780,121 13,283,342 700,176 14,776,961 .90 1.11 Indiana\4\ 579,993 8,664,317 391,694 7,491,417 .68 .86 Iowa 240,302 4,324,930 213,998 4,992,745 .89 1.15 Kansas 257,994 4,030,973 212,340 4,447,606 .82 1.10 Kentucky 430,912 5,519,944 248,566 5,837,444 .58 1.06 Louisiana 393,851 5,835,556 242,787 7,301,405 .62 1.25 Maine 117,523 1,742,058 119,283 1,978,394 1.01 1.14 Maryland 376,341 5,584,561 270,851 8,266,776 .72 1.48 Massachusetts\4\ 416,169 6,446,483 667,643 10,993,298 1.60 1.71 Michigan 775,551 11,824,298 486,328 10,580,301 .63 .89 Minnesota 270,499 5,567,477 292,046 7,141,040 1.08 1.28 Mississippi 296,925 4,054,149 190,305 4,034,289 .64 1.00 Missouri 573,654 8,287,960 380,213 7,887,481 .66 .95 Montana 107,069 1,549,726 166,251 3,707,949 1.55 2.39 Nebraska 173,648 2,595,434 138,715 3,000,203 .80 1.16 Nevada\4\ 139,554 1,619,737 133,843 2,526,690 .96 1.56 New Hampshire 92,132 1,241,184 95,641 1,755,548 1.04 1.41 New Jersey 583,330 9,309,786 498,402 9,536,603 .85 1.02 New Mexico\4\ 188,498 2,548,442 173,241 3,473,829 .92 1.36 New York 972,730 15,944,304 1,111,112 19,336,458 1.14 1.21 North Carolina 705,748 9,340,568 453,950 7,940,104 .64 .85 North Dakota 78,695 1,174,634 125,483 2,272,266 1.59 1.93 Ohio 799,378 14,133,108 611,090 13,044,990 .76 .92 Oklahoma 378,306 5,511,181 245,399 4,721,585 .65 .86 Oregon\4\ 292,450 4,200,078 344,001 5,074,565 1.18 1.21 Pennsylvania 912,823 14,584,905 836,714 16,728,859 .92 1.15 Rhode Island 62,043 1,025,615 107,781 2,284,140 1.74 2.23 South Carolina 396,711 5,008,927 232,438 4,391,876 .59 .88 South Dakota 74,618 1,239,920 131,593 2,436,921 1.76 1.97 Tennessee 560,320 7,440,407 329,857 7,361,303 .59 .99 Texas 1,705,426 24,629,267 1,012,253 20,874,751 .59 .85 Utah 191,866 2,255,867 135,519 3,686,132 .71 1.63 Vermont 65,697 795,810 75,435 1,713,797 1.15 2.15 Virginia 639,538 8,187,423 403,234 9,299,282 .63 1.14 Washington 431,813 5,830,648 438,897 9,174,921 1.02 1.57 West Virginia 180,544 2,611,755 212,956 5,220,120 1.18 2.00 Wisconsin 443,212 6,431,327 318,906 5,683,614 .72 .88 Wyoming 102,198 1,328,479 126,284 2,572,212 1.24 1.94 ------------------ ------------------------------ ------------------ ------------------------------ ------------------ ------------------------------ Total 22,033,866 320,698,459 17,632,659 359,778,762 .80 1.12 American Samoa 4,149 49,163 Guam 13,693 134,011 Northern Marianas 4,160 33,340 Puerto Rico 76,811 1,402,422 Virgin Islands 21,810 145,856 ------------------ ------------------------------ ------------------ ------------------------------ ------------------ ------------------------------ Grand total 22,033,866 320,698,459 17,753,282 361,543,554 .81 1.13 \1\Payments into the fund include only the net tax receipts deposited in the highway account of the Federal highway trust fund. Excluded are motor fuel taxes transferred to the ``Mass transit'' account of the highway trust fund (1 cent per gallon from April 1, 1983, through November 30, 1990, 1.5 cents per gallon until September 30, 1995, and 2.0 cents per gallon thereafter); the 0.1 cent per gallon tax dedicated to the leaking underground storage tank trust fund beginning January 1, 1987 and ending December 31, 1995; the tax designated for deficit reduction (2.5 cents per gallon from December 1, 1990, through September 30, 1993, 6.8 cents until September 30, 1995, and 4.3 cents thereafter); and the tax from motorboat use of gasoline transferred to the aquatic resources trust fund and the land and water conservation fund. \2\Total Federal highway trust fund receipts are reported by the U.S. Department of the Treasury. Payments into the highway trust fund attributable to highway users in each State are estimated by the Federal Highway Administration. Includes revenues from highway-user taxes only. \3\Includes all funds apportioned or allocated from the highway trust fund except for the following programs: Indian reservation roads, highway safety information, and local transportation assistance. These programs are either administered by other Federal agencies or are treated as administrative funds and cannot be easily attributed to individual States. Obligations are used to represent allocations for alcohol safety incentive grants and the Woodrow Wilson Bridge. \4\Data for these States will be revised. Other States may also change, if revised data is provided to FHWA. BRIDGE DISCRETIONARY FUNDS In the past, the Committee has directed the Secretary of Transportation to give priority designation, consistent with existing criteria, to several bridges that have extremely low rating factors and which serve as major links for both intrastate and interstate commerce and which directly impact the economic development of an area. Current law reserves $60,500,000 for discretionary bridge projects. The Committee directs FHWA to give priority consideration to the bridge over the Missouri River at Yankton, SD; the Cooper River bridges in Charleston, SC; bridges on I 15 in Utah; and the Kimball and Silver Creek junctions on I 80 in Utah; and the Bill Emerson Memorial Bridge in Cape Girardeau, MO. TIMBER BRIDGE Current law also reserves discretionary highway timber research and demonstration program funding. Consistent with the criteria established in section 1039 of Public Law 102 240, $1,000,000 is available for research grants and information transfer and $7,500,000 is available for construction grants. The Committee directs that, out of construction grants, $2,000,000 be available for the covered bridge restoration project in Vermont. DISCRETIONARY INTERSTATE 4 R Current law reserves $65,000,000 of national highway system funds for discretionary allocation for projects to resurface, restore rehabilitative, or reconstruct Interstate highway segments. The Committee directs FHWA to give priority consideration to widening of I 15 in Nevada from I 215 to SR 146, I 15 reconstruction from 10800 south to 600 north in Utah, the University Avenue/I 15 interchange reconfiguration in Provo, UT, and the Sunset Way interchange on I 90 in Issaquah, WA. FEDERAL LANDS HIGHWAY PROGRAMS Consistent with section 204 of title 23 United States Code, which authorizes the Federal Lands Highways Program, the Committee directs that priority consideration be given the following projects: straightening of 18 miles of BIA Route 1281 (Snake Road) in Florida, upgrading the SR 160/Pahrump Highway in Nevada, and construction of an access road in Snowbasin within the Wasatch National Forest, UT. The Committee is concerned about the fact that the distribution of Federal lands funds among the States bears very little relationship to the proportion of Federal lands within the States or regions of the country. The Committee is concerned about responsibility for maintaining the 38-mile portion of Beartooth Highway from the Montana-Wyoming border to the northeast entrance of Yellowstone National Park. The road, which is closed to travel in the winter months due to excessive snow conditions, is completely surrounded by Custer and Shoshone National Forests. The Committee is concerned about responsibility for snow removal in the spring. Snow removal is a necessary maintenance requirement to open the road prior to Memorial Day each year. Although responsibility has historically been assumed by the National Park Service, negotiations this year between Montana and Wyoming, the Park Service, and the National Forest Service indicated that none of the entities has the resources to assume snow removal responsibilities. The Committee urges FHWA to work to resolve this issue among the parties to ensure that this critical road is opened to traffic before Memorial Day next year. In addition, the Committee urges FHWA to work with the Department of the Interior and the State of Montana to ensure that snow removal needs on the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park, MT, are met. INTERSTATE DISCRETIONARY Under the ISTEA highway authorization, the final set-aside of funds for the Interstate Discretionary Program occurred in fiscal year 1995. As of February 28, 1997, $61,247,428 of these funds were available for distribution which is expected to occur in fiscal year 1998. FERRYBOAT AND FACILITIES Current law provides $18,000,000 for ferryboat and facilities construction. Within this amount, the Committee directs that $6,390,000 be available for the Hollis-Craig-Ketchikan ferry in light of the fact that the Committee is recommending an earlier designation of FTA New Start funds for this project be deleted since the project is more appropriately funded in this account. The Committee further directs that FHWA give priority consideration to the following projects: purchase of a ferryboat for Taney County, MO; improvements to the North Carolina State ferry system; rehabilitation of the multimodal ferry terminal in Clinton, WA; and return to service of the Nobska ferry for operation between New Bedford, MA, and Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket. With respect to the Nobska project, the Committee urges FHWA to reconsider the eligibility of the Nobska provided that it remain in service to the public and that it remain governed by its previous agreement with the Commonwealth. SCENIC BYWAYS PROGRAM Current law provides $14,000,000 for planning, design, and development of State scenic byway programs. The Committee directs FHWA to give priority consideration to the safety improvement program on Highway 101 around the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. OTHER Railroad/highway safety project--Lincoln County, MS .--For the purpose of constructing an overpass to improve access and enhance highway/rail safety and economic development at an industrial park site in Brookhaven in Lincoln County, MS, the State of Mississippi may use funds previously allocated to it under the transportation enhancements program, provided that the State would otherwise be unable to use the funds for transportation enhancement projects consistent with current law. RIGHT-OF-WAY REVOLVING FUND (Limitation on Direct Loans) (Highway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1996 ........................... Appropriations, 1997 ........................... Committee recommendation $8,000,000 The Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1968 authorized $300,000,000 for the establishment of the right-of-way revolving fund. This fund is utilized to make cash advances to the States for the purpose of purchasing right-of-way parcels in advance of highway construction and thereby preventing the inflation of land prices from causing a significant increase in construction costs. When right-of-way acquisition has been made and highway construction is initiated, the State becomes eligible for Federal grants under the various Federal-aid highway authorizations. At the point when progress payments are made to the State for construction, the State in turn reimburses the revolving fund for advances made to that State for right-of-way acquisition. Utilizing this method of funding, all reimbursements made to the revolving fund may be reallocated to other States requiring advances. The administration requested a prohibition on further obligations for 1998. The Committee has included bill language to allow for the obligation of net reimbursements, that is when repayments exceed other costs. It is estimated that $8,000,000 is necessary to cover the subsidy costs of the new, net loans. MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY GRANTS (liquidation of contract authorization) (Highway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1997 $74,000,000 Budget estimate, 1998 90,000,000 Committee recommendation 85,000,000 This program was first authorized by the Surface Transportation Assistance Act of 1982. It provides grants to States for improved enforcement of Federal and State motor carrier safety rules. It has been shown that added enforcement of truck safety rules reduces truck-related accidents and fatalities. The major objective of this program is to reduce the number and severity of accidents involving commercial motor vehicles. The Committee recommends a liquidating cash appropriation of $85,000,000. LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS The Committee recommends a limitation on obligations of $84,300,000 for motor carrier safety grants. This is an increase of $6,075,000 over the 1997 enacted level and a decrease of $15,700,000 below the budget request. The Committee recommends the following changes to the budget request: Safety performance incentive grants -$3,500,000 State training and administration -200,000 Information systems and analysis -12,000,000 -15,700,000 Safety performance incentive grants .--The Committee favors a performance-based allocation formula for the MCSAP which would provide maximum flexibility to the States, while still maintaining the safety achievements of the current program. To encourage the FHWA and the MCSAP States to complete the necessary rulemaking and program changes to achieve this objective, the Committee recommends $4,000,000 for safety performance incentive grants. The Committee looks forward to reviewing a final regulation amending the current allocation formula and program structure of the MCSAP. State training and administration .--The Committee has provided $800,000 for State training and administration, which is $200,000 below the administration's request. The Committee has increased the basic grants to States, which will allow States to assume a larger role in training their officers. Information systems and analysis .--The Committee is aware that FHWA is finding many examples where its information systems are lacking data on crashes involving specific commercial motor carriers. This information is of critical importance in targeting problem operators and in reducing the number of unnecessary audits to compliant carriers. To this end, the Committee has provided $1,000,000 to be used by the States to improve accident reporting. Commercial vehicle information system .--The Committee has provided $3,000,000 to help the States implement the commercial vehicle information system. The Committee has increased the amount provided for this activity to respond to the increased number of States that want to participate in this successful program. FHWA shall prepare a report to both the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations before January 1, 1998, detailing the current costs and benefits of investments in the CVIS program. Driver program initiative .--The Committee has provided $1,000,000 to address various driver challenges affecting the driver licensing component of commercial vehicle safety. These moneys can be used to improve data systems regarding driver records, transmission of judicial decisions needed by State licensing agencies, and State licensing and testing processes. Moneys may also be used to assist the States in meeting CDL regulatory requirements, and other program evaluation and monitoring activities. STATE INFRASTRUCTURE BANKS (highway trust fund) Appropriations, 1997 (general fund) $150,000,000 Budget estimate, 1998 (trust fund) 150,000,000 Committee recommendation ........................... State infrastructure banks are a promising way of facilitating needed infrastructure investment, especially when all levels of government are facing constrained resources. State infrastructure banks are a means of increasing and improving both public and private investment in transportation. The National Highway System Designation Act of 1995 modified by the 1997 Department of Transportation Appropriations Act authorized States to test State infrastructure banks [SIB's] which would provide greater flexibility to support the financing of projects by using Federal-aid funds for revolving loans and other forms of nontraditional financial assistance for both public and private entities developing eligible transportation projects. States have shown significant interest in exploring the infrastructure financing benefits offered by this concept. Thirty-eight States are now participating in the SIB pilot program. This program is new, and, while the great majority of States have shown interest in the program, there is little evidence yet of its effectiveness. The Committee does not propose to provide additional SIB seed money in fiscal year 1998. If participating States find SIB's to be an effective way to increase investment, they can use their regularly apportioned Federal-aid funds to capitalize SIB's further. The Committee proposes a major increase in the amount of Federal-aid highway funds that would be available for obligation. INFRASTRUCTURE CREDIT PROGRAM Appropriations, 1997 ........................... Budget estimate, 1998 (trust fund) $100,000,000 Committee recommendation ........................... (Highway Trust Fund) The administration proposes $100,000,000 for an infrastructure credit enhancement program. This program is intended to address the funding gap for large projects of national significance that due to their scale and complexity cannot be adequately funded through a SIB. This new program would supplement existing Federal programs and leverage private capital investment. This program has not yet been authorized, so the Committee proposes no funding for fiscal year 1998. NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION SUMMARY OF FISCAL YEAR 1998 PROGRAM The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [NHTSA] was established as a separate organizational entity in the Department of Transportation in March 1970, to reduce the mounting number of deaths, injuries, and economic costs resulting from traffic crashes on the Nation's highways. The National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act provides for the establishment and enforcement of Federal safety standards for motor vehicles and associated equipment and research, including the operation of required testing facilities and the National Driver Register. The Motor Vehicle Information and Cost Savings Act initially provided for the establishment of low-speed collision bumper standards, consumer information activities, diagnostic inspection, and odometer regulations and was later amended to incorporate responsibility for the administration of Federal automotive fuel economy standards. The Highway Safety Act provides for a coordinated highway safety grant program to be carried out by the States, together with supporting research, development, and demonstration programs. Under section 403 of title 23, United States Code, technical assistance is provided to the States in the conduct of their highway safety programs, and research and demonstration projects are conducted to develop and show the effectiveness of new techniques and countermeasures to address highway safety problems including the Safe Communities Injury Control Program initiated in 1996. Grants are provided to the States under title 23, United States Code, section 402 to assist in the establishment and improvement of highway safety programs designed to reduce traffic crashes, deaths, and injuries. Grants are funded as contract authority and apportioned by formula to the States. Alcohol incentive grants are also allocated to the States for driver impairment safety programs under title 23, United States Code, section 410. In addition, some Federal-aid highway apportionments may be transferred, pursuant to 23 U.S.C. 153, to States that have not put safety belt use laws into effect. The Committee recommends a total program level of $333,500,000 for the activities and programs of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration for fiscal year 1998. This is $500,000 more than the budget request. The following table summarizes the Committee recommendations: Program Fiscal year 1997 enacted\1\ Fiscal year 1998 estimate Committee recommendation Operations and research $132,612,000 $147,500,000 $146,500,000 General funds (80,900,000) (74,760,000) Highway trust funds (51,712,000) (147,500,000) (71,740,000) Highway traffic safety grants\2\ \3\168,100,000 \3\185,500,000 \3\187,000,000 ----------------------------- --------------------------- -------------------------- Total \4\300,712,000 333,000,000 333,500,000 \1\Excludes reductions for TASC and awards pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. \2\Limitation on obligations. \3\Includes highway-related safety grants program previously funded in FHWA. \4\Excludes $3,000,000 in contract authorization provided in Public Law 105 18. OPERATIONS AND RESEARCH (Including Highway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1997\1\ $132,612,000 Budget estimate, 1998 147,500,000 Committee recommendation 146,500,000 \1\Excludes reduction of $629,812 for TASC and awards pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. The bill includes an appropriation of $146,500,000 for operations and research, which is $1,000,000 less than the budget request. This level of funding provides for 660 full-time permanent positions. The amount appropriated is to be distributed as follows: [Dollar amounts in thousands] Program Fiscal year 1997 appropriation level Fiscal year 1998 budget estimate Committee recommendation Safety performance $12,226 $13,124 $13,124 Safety assurance $18,966 $19,923 $19,348 Highway safety $44,465 $49,665 $48,920 Research and analysis $50,387 $57,411 $57,411 Office of the Administrator $3,728 $4,116 $4,116 General administration $8,568 $9,419 $9,419 Grant administration reimbursement -$6,358 -$6,158 -$5,838 Accountwide adjustments ---------------------------------- -------------------------- -------------------------------------- Total $131,982 $147,500 $146,500 (Positions) (664) (664) (660) \1\Excludes reductions for TASC and awards pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. Adjustments have been made to the administration's requested level in the following accounts: Safety assurance: -$500,000 -75,000 Highway safety: +413,000 +1,066,000 -204,000 -2,000,000 +300,000 -320,000 SAFETY PERFORMANCE STANDARDS Airbag deactivation rule .--While NHTSA estimates that thousands of lives have been saved as a result of airbags since 1990, more than 60 people have been killed by airbags in crashes that, without the airbag, were unlikely to cause injury. Most of these victims have been small-statured adults and children. The Committee is aware of the substantial public concern regarding the potential dangers of airbags. Many parents are not able to fit all of their children in the back seat of a car, and many families carpool, which often requires children to ride in the front seat. The Committee directs NHTSA by December 31, 1997, to make a determination with regard to its pending rulemaking on airbag deactivation. The Committee also directs NHTSA to continue to make available to parents and other individuals accurate information on the safety benefits and risks of airbags and on the correct use of airbags. Uniform tire quality grading standards .--The Committee has included a prohibition that has been included in previous appropriations acts, on any rulemaking which would require that passenger car tires be labeled to indicate their low rolling resistance, or fuel economy characteristics. The Committee has included this provision because the need for such labels has not been adequately justified and the additional costs associated with this proposal would likely be prohibitive. SAFETY ASSURANCE Auto safety hotline .--The Committee recommends $953,000 to continue present operations of the auto safety hotline. In fiscal year 1997, funding for this program increased 125 percent to $1,483,000. One of the reasons for this dramatic increase was to expand computer and telephone equipment to handle a greater volume of calls. This equipment upgrade has largely been accomplished, and therefore, such a high level of funding should not be needed. The Committee's level of $953,000 represents a 45-percent increase over the fiscal year 1996 level. Moreover, the Committee urges NHTSA to maximize the use of the internet both to improve access to safety reports and brochures and to receive information on possible vehicle defects. Odometer fraud program. --The Committee has provided a total of $135,000 for the odometer fraud program, which is $75,000 more than the fiscal year 1997 level and $75,000 less than the administration's request. HIGHWAY SAFETY PROGRAMS Alcohol, drugs, and State programs .--The Committee has provided $10,209,000, the same amount appropriated for fiscal year 1997 and $1,066,000 more than the administration's request. Alcohol was involved in more than 17,000 traffic fatalities in 1996, accounting for more than 41 percent of all traffic fatalities. Furthermore, the number of alcohol-related traffic fatalities increased in 1996 for the first time in many years. To address this challenge, it is important that at least the fiscal year 1997 level of alcohol countermeasure funding be maintained. National Occupant Protection Program .--The Committee has provided $7,023,000, which is $413,000 above the administration's requested level, in order to enhance NHTSA's effort to meet the national goal of 85 percent belt use rate throughout the United States. There is overwhelming evidence that increased seatbelt use is the most effective mechanism in preventing traffic-related injuries and fatalities. Increasing belt use to 85 percent is expected to prevent almost 4,200 fatalities and 102,000 injuries and is estimated to save the Nation $6,700,000,000 annually in medical expenses and losses in economic productivity. Within the funds provided, the Committee has included $1,000,000 in State grants for a new pilot program for States to experiment with alternative safety restraint bar devices on schoolbuses. The Committee is encouraged by new technologies which would improve safety restraint usage rates on schoolbuses. NHTSA shall report back to the Committee no later than December 31, 1997, on the implementation of this program. Enforcement and emergency services .--The Committee has provided $3,196,000, $811,000 more than the fiscal year 1997 level and $204,000 less than the administration's request. The Committee has not included funding for a new Federal study to demonstrate that traffic enforcement can lead to criminal apprehension. The link between traffic enforcement and criminal activity is apparent and has already been documented by NHTSA, and does not necessitate a new Federal study. Automatic external defibrillators .--The Committee believes that the use of automatic external defibrillators [AED's] by emergency responders can significantly improve cardiac arrest survival rates. To ensure that training standards for use of AED's are not unnecessarily burdensome and are consistent with new easy-to-use AED technology, the Committee encourages the Secretary to work with State departments of transportation and other appropriate State agencies to review their defibrillator training requirements and to modify these requirements where appropriate. Driving, drugs, and youth initiative .--The Committee has not provided any funds for this initiative. It is doubtful that prelicensor drug testing, which is more of an intelligence test than a safety countermeasure, would have any measurable impact on teen drug use or on traffic safety problems caused by younger drivers. This 4-year demonstration program would cost at least $16,000,000 during the next 3 years and would detract from the amount of funds available for many critical highway safety initiatives, such as reducing alcohol-impaired driving, increasing seatbelt use, reducing drug-impaired driving, and programs to improve youth driving skills. This initiative is designed to be a demonstration program for other States to model, but most States will be discouraged from repeating this program because of the serious constitutional, legal, and privacy issues raised by this program, and the enormous startup costs States would incur without Federal assistance. The Committee notes that the National Association of Governors' Highway Safety Representatives opposes this program. Head injury management .--The Committee has included $300,000 for the purpose of improving prehospital care for head-injured patients. Each year, 500,000 people are hospitalized due to head injuries, the majority of which are caused by motor vehicle accidents. The economic impact of traumatic brain injury is estimated at more than $40,000,000,000 annually. The American Association of Neurological Surgeons [AANS], the Congress of Neurosurgeons [CNS], and the World Health Organization Committee on Neurotrauma have recently endorsed a single set of scientifically based ``Guidelines for the Management of Severe Head Injury.'' In 1996, the guidelines were published and distributed to neurosurgeons, neurologists, critical care physicians, and emergency room physicians throughout the United States. However, although one-third of the guidelines address prehospital resuscitation and care, to date no direct effort has been made to get the guidelines, and the protocol spelled out within them, to the emergency medical service medical directors or the emergency medical service personnel in the ambulances and helicopters. The Committee has provided $300,000 so that the scientific guidelines may be translated into a useful document for EMS personnel, including the development of new patient management protocol, algorithms, and training support materials. The Committee encourages NHTSA to work with the Aitken Neuroscience Institute to accomplish this objective. FTE reduction .--The administration has given States considerably more flexibility under the section 402 State Highway Safety Grant Program and reduced the level of Federal management of this program. NHTSA should not need as many employees to administer this program. Therefore, the Committee is reducing the FTE level and transferring the corresponding funds into the State grant program. RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS Special crash investigations .--The Committee has provided the requested increase in funding to analyze airbag-related crashes which involve serious injuries or fatalities. Following the March 1997 NHTSA rule which allows automobile manufacturers to depower their airbags, many manufacturers have announced that all, or most, of their 1998 model year vehicles will incorporate depowered bags. Therefore, the Committee directs NHTSA to ensure that sufficient emphasis is placed on quantifying the safety benefits and costs associated with depowering airbags. Specifically, NHTSA should investigate crashes involving vehicles with depowered airbags in which there was a front-seat occupant fatality or serious injury and compare the effectiveness of depowered airbags with that of full-powered airbags for: (1) vulnerable occupants such as small-statured adults and children; (2) all unbelted occupants; and (3) fatalities and injuries for all occupants. Biomechanics .--The Committee recommends $10,587,000, the amount requested in the budget. This appropriation continues funding for hospital-based, indepth crash injury studies at four trauma centers. Currently, these centers are located at the William Lehman Injury Research Center at Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami; the National Study Center for Trauma and EMS, Baltimore; the University of Medicine and Dentistry, New Jersey; and the Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC. HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY GRANTS (Liquidation of Contract Authorization) (Highway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1997 ($168,100,000) Budget estimate, 1998 (185,000,000) Committee recommendation (186,000,000) The budget provides for the continuation of the safety formula grant program. Grant allocations are determined on the basis of a statutory formula established under 23 U.S.C. 402. The budget proposes consolidating grant programs into a State and community formula grant program. Individual States use this funding in national priority areas established by Congress which have the greatest potential for achieving safety improvements and reducing traffic crashes, fatalities, and injuries. The alcohol incentive grant program encourages States to enact stiffer laws and implement stronger programs to detect and remove impaired drivers from the roads. The proposed occupant protection program encourages States to promote and strengthen occupant protection initiatives. The Committee recommends an appropriation for liquidation of contract authorization of $186,000,000 for the payment of obligations incurred in carrying out provisions of the State and Community Highway Safety Program (sec. 402) and the Impaired Driving Countermeasures Incentive Grant Program (sec. 410). The Committee has included a provision prohibiting the use of section 402 funds for construction, rehabilitation or remodeling costs, or for office furnishings and fixtures for State, local, or private buildings or structures. LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS The bill includes language limiting the obligations to be incurred under the various highway traffic safety grants programs, as requested in the budget. Separate obligation limitations are included in the bill with the following funding allocations: Fiscal year 1997 enacted Fiscal year 1998 estimate Committee recommendation State and community grants\1\ $140,200,000 $140,200,000 $150,700,000 Alcohol incentive grants 25,500,000 34,000,000 34,000,000 Occupant protection incentive grants 9,000,000 National Driver Register 2,400,000 2,300,000 2,300,000 -------------------------- --------------------------- -------------------------- Total 168,100,000 185,500,000 187,000,000 \1\Merges FHWA's and NHTSA's section 402 formula grant programs. The Committee has included an obligation limitation of $150,700,000 for the section 402 program, which is $10,500,000 more than the budget request. This limitation includes $138,700,000 for NHTSA's section 402 grant program and $12,000,000 for FHWA's section 402 grant program. Language is included in the bill limiting funds available for Federal grants administration to $4,948,000. A reduction of four FTE's of NHTSA personnel in the field is recommended with the savings being transferred to the States to help design their own safety programs after careful evaluation of their safety problems and resources. Within the moneys allowed for the section 402 program, the Committee has included $9,000,000 to expedite the efforts of the States to increase seatbelt use. The Committee intends that these funds will be used for occupant protection activities beyond the estimated amount that each State spent in this area in fiscal year 1997. The Committee has provided additional funds beyond the amount requested for the basic section 402 program to support the States' efforts to prepare performance-based highway safety plans. As a result of interim final regulations issued by NHTSA and FHWA, all States will be required to prepare performance-based plans during fiscal year 1998 to receive section 402 moneys. The preparation of these documents will require improved data analysis and information systems and program evaluation. To defer these additional costs, the Committee has recommended $1,500,000 above the administration's request. FORMULA GRANTS (SEC. 410) The Committee proposes a total limitation of $34,000,000 for obligations to be incurred under the section 410 Alcohol-Impaired Driving Countermeasures Program authorized under the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. The section 410 program has provided incentives to States to implement innovative strategies to reduce drunk and drugged driving, and constitutes an essential part of the goal to reduce alcohol-related traffic deaths. To receive grants under the section 410 program, States must satisfy certain basic criteria established by Congress, including prompt license suspension, legal blood-alcohol content levels, sobriety checkpoints, self-sustaining community alcohol programs, mandatory sentencing, and control of access to alcohol by youth. Supplemental grant funding is available to States that meet additional criteria, including .02 BAC zero tolerance laws for drivers under age 21, open container laws, strict drugged driving prevention programs, and mandatory BAC testing programs. Section 410 grants funds may be used only to support programs to reduce impaired driving. The bill includes language, as requested, providing that $500,000 of the section 410 moneys shall be used for technical assistance. NATIONAL DRIVER REGISTER The National Driver Register [NDR] is a central repository of information on individuals whose licenses to operate a motor vehicle have been revoked, suspended, canceled, or denied. As authorized by Congress, the NDR is transitioning to an electronic problem driver pointer system to facilitate the decisionmaking by State driver licensing officials. NHTSA is preparing for transfer of certain NDR activities to a non-Federal entity. The NDR also contains information on persons who have been convicted of serious traffic-related violations such as driving while impaired by alcohol or other drugs. State driver licensing officials query the NDR when individuals apply for a license, for the purpose of determining whether driving privileges have been withdrawn by other States. Other organizations such as the Federal Aviation Administration and the Federal Railroad Administration also use NDR license data in hiring and certification decisions in overall U.S. transportation operations. The bill includes an obligation limitation of $2,300,000 for the NDR, which is the same as the administration's request. FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION SUMMARY OF FISCAL YEAR 1998 PROGRAM The Federal Railroad Administration [FRA] became an operating administration within the Department of Transportation on April 1, 1967. It incorporated the Bureau of Railroad Safety from the Interstate Commerce Commission, the Office of High Speed Ground Transportation from the Department of Commerce, and the Alaska Railroad from the Department of the Interior. The Federal Railroad Administration is responsible for planning, developing, and administering programs to achieve safe operating and mechanical practices in the railroad industry. Grants to the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) and other financial assistance programs to rehabilitate and improve the railroad industry's physical plant are also administered by the Federal Railroad Administration. The Committee recommends new appropriations and obligation limitations totaling $618,223,000 for the activities of the Federal Railroad Administration for fiscal year 1998. This is $278,086,000 less than the budget request. The following table summarizes the Committee recommendations: Program Fiscal year 1997 enacted\1\ Fiscal year 1998 budget estimate Committee recommendation Office of the Administrator $16,739,000 $20,559,000 $19,800,000 Railroad safety 51,407,000 57,067,000 57,067,000 Railroad research and development 20,100,000 21,638,000 24,906,000 Northeast Corridor Improvement Program 175,000,000 273,450,000 Railroad Rehabilitation and Improvement Program High-speed rail trainsets and facilities 80,000,000 Next generation high-speed rail 24,757,000 19,595,000 26,000,000 Alaska railroad rehabilitation 10,000,000 17,000,000 Rhode Island rail development 7,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000 Direct Loan Financing Program 58,680,000 Grants to National Railroad Passenger Corpora- tion\2\ 587,950,000 344,000,000 Capital grants to National Railroad Passenger Corporation (HTF) 445,450,00 Operating grants to National Railroad Passenger Corporation (HTF) 344,000,000 ----------------------------- ---------------------------------- -------------------------- \1\Excludes reductions for TASC and awards pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205; also excludes $18,900,000 in emergency railroad rehabilitation and repair. \2\Includes mandatory passenger rail service payments. OFFICE OF THE ADMINISTRATOR Appropriations, 1997\1\ $16,739,000 Budget estimate, 1998 20,559,000 Committee recommendation 19,800,000 \1\Excludes reductions for TASC and awards pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. The Office of the Administrator provides support and guidance on issues concerning the railroad industry and the day-to-day operations of the Federal Railroad Administration. The appropriation includes budget activities related to executive direction and administration and policy support aimed at resolving problems facing the railroad industry. For the Office of the Administrator, the Committee provides $19,800,000. The amount provided is $759,000 less than the administration's request. COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION The Committee recommends the following adjustments to the budget request: Limit growth in technical assistance and policy support -$50,000 Limit growth in support services -85,000 Limit growth in information technology -146,000 Reduce costs for GSA rent -442,000 Chief Counsel staffing ( -1 FTE) -36,000 Technical assistance and policy support .--The Committee recommends $50,000 for contract support, which is $50,000 less than the amount requested. The additional funds provided will allow FRA to improve the analytical tools used by the States to decide whether to invest in rail-related projects. The Committee has not provided the amount requested because of budgetary limitations and the availability of more than 20 staff in the Office of Policy and Program Development to conduct much of the analysis needed to support its mission. Support services .--Because of budgetary limitations, the Committee is recommending $40,000, which is $85,000 below the request. This reduction shall not affect travel in the Northeast corridor to maintain adequate Amtrak oversight. Information technology .--Because of budgetary limitations and the need to reduce the rate of funding increase in this area, the Committee is recommending $146,000, which is $146,000 below the request. GSA rent .--The Committee is concerned that FRA is incurring higher rental costs at its headquarters offices in downtown Washington than it would at the Nassif Building, where other departmental agencies are located. The Committee, therefore, recommends a GSA rent funding level of $2,513,000, a reduction of $442,000 below the administration's request. It is the Committee's strong preference that FRA return its headquarters staff to the Nassif Building where the agency is more fully integrated within the departmental community. Chief Counsel staffing .--It is the Committee's opinion that the additional position requested to assist the Chief Counsel's office with regulatory issues is not necessary at this time. Operation Respond .--Operation Respond is a project designed to improve information available to first responders at hazardous materials and passenger train incidents. Through software and training developed by this joint industry/government partnership, fire and law enforcement dispatch centers have increased capability to determine quickly and accurately the contents of a hazardous material railcar or truck trailer involved in an accident. Currently there are approximately 104 installations using this technology in 17 States. Work has resulted in the development and demonstration of a CD ROM that includes diagrams and photographs of rail equipment, suggested extrication points, rescue guidelines, emergency/handicapped features of railcars as well as full motion video and audio procedures for removal of passenger car windows and doors. The Federal investment in this program has successfully generated commensurate investments from rail and commercial motor vehicle carriers. The Committee sees benefit in supporting this program to include regional and shortline railroads as well as continuing refinements in the area of passenger rail. The Committee's allowance includes $50,000, as requested, to support this important program. Additional funds for Operation Respond are included in the Intelligent Transportation Systems Program within the Federal Highway Administration section of this report. RAILROAD SAFETY Appropriations, 1997\1\ $51,407,000 Budget estimate, 1998 57,067,000 Committee recommendation 57,067,000 \1\Excludes reductions for TASC and awards pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. This appropriation finances the development, administration, and enforcement of programs designed to achieve safe operating and mechanical practices in the railroad industry. The Committee recommends a $57,067,000 program level for the Railroad Safety Program, the same amount requested by the administration. COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION The Committee recommends the following adjustments to the budget request: Limit staff increase and associated personnel costs ( -2 FTE's) -$72,000 Limit growth in technology systems -77,000 Rail safety advisory committee -100,000 Administrative reduction -40,000 Automated track inspection vehicle -111,000 Grade crossing safety activities +400,000 FRA-wide technology systems .--Because of budgetary limitations, the Committee recommends a reduction of $77,000 for FRA-wide technology systems. FRA is provided the flexibility to find necessary cost savings within the budget of the Office of Safety to pay for video conferencing and imaging systems. Railroad Safety Advisory Committee [RSAC] .--The cooperative work of rail industry, labor, government, and other concerned parties assembled under the auspices of the Railroad Safety Advisory Committee, has been rather successful. The quality of proposed regulations has improved. Neither rail labor nor management have voiced any concerns to the Committee regarding this process, and the overall costs of regulatory formulation have decreased. The Committee commends this process and praises the voluntary contributions of all those individuals involved. Because of the success of this effort and the need for continued progress in FRA's regulatory process, the Committee recommends an increase of $50,000 over the enacted level to support the RSAC. Because of budgetary limitations and the longstanding interest of reducing expenses of the Department's Federal advisory committees, the Committee is unable to provide the entire amount requested. The Committee also notes that other modal administrations use negotiated rulemaking processes without requesting substantial increases in their operating budgets. Administrative reduction .--The Office of Safety is provided the administrative flexibility to find $40,000 in savings from travel, permanent change of station costs, bonuses, or other administrative expenses. Automated track inspection vehicle [ATIP] .--The Committee strongly supports FRA's efforts to replace the T 10 track geometry inspection vehicle. ATIP provides a means of detecting geometry defects in track that help direct critical repairs and prevent track-related accidents, and also assists FRA safety inspectors in planning their inspections based on historical trends. The current vehicle is 16 years old, and has become more difficult to use due to nonavailability of parts and lack of expertise to repair. However, the Committee is confident that reducing the $3,000,000 requested funding for ATIP by $111,000 will not delay the design, integration, installation, and delivery of the new vehicle beyond the 18-month schedule estimated by the agency. Grade crossing safety .--The Committee recommends that not less than $600,000 shall be allocated for activities to improve grade crossing safety. This represents an increase of $400,000 above the base program level of $200,000. FRA's grade crossing program will include: encouraging the safe consolidation and closing of crossings consistent with State and local objectives; working with State and local government safety officials to reduce the risk of crashes; promoting the use of technology to improve compliance with traffic signals and signs; and providing outreach and educational materials to the judicial and enforcement community. These funds are in addition to those provided for information analysis and collection. Significant improvements in grade crossing safety have been realized, especially since 1994. Continued reductions in the number of grade crossing fatalities and injuries will require sustained efforts by the traffic safety community, industry, and the FRA. The Committee supports FRA's longstanding commitment that its field staff dedicate a portion of their time to Operation Lifesaver activities. Unfortunately, FRA's commitment to this objective has apparently diminished. Although there are other workload demands on FRA's inspectors, these demands should be balanced with the need to address the major causal factor of death and injury associated with rail transportation: namely, failure to comply with grade crossing signs and signals and railroad property rights. Consequently, the Committee requests the Administrator to reinstitute and adhere to the goal of ensuring that most FRA inspectors play a definitive role in promoting the public educational aspects of grade crossing safety and preventing trespassing on railroad properties. The Committee directs FRA to prepare a letter to the House and Senate Appropriations Committees detailing significantly increased inspector time allocated toward Operation Lifesaver activities. The letter, to be submitted by May 1, 1998, shall include information of the increased frequency of Operation Lifesaver contacts and copies of memoranda to the field staff demonstrating FRA's commitment to the goal of active FRA participation in Operation Lifesaver activities. The Committee encourages FRA to increase the percentage of safety inspectors who are certified to be Operation Lifesaver presenters from the current level of 60 percent to 80 percent. RAILROAD RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Appropriations, 1997\1\ $20,100,000 Budget estimate, 1998 21,638,000 Committee recommendation 24,906,000 \1\Excludes reductions for TASC pursuant to section 321 of Public Law 104 205. The Federal Railroad Administration's Railroad Research and Development Program provides for research in the development of safety and performance standards for high speed rail and the evaluation of their role in the Nation's transportation infrastructure. The program also provides support for the Deputy Associate Administrator for Technology Development and the staff of the Office of Research and Development. The Committee recommends an appropriation of $24,906,000 for railroad research and development. COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION The Committee recommends the following changes to the administration's budget submission: Equipment, operations, and hazardous materials +$250,000 Track, structures, and train control +3,500,000 Safety of high-speed ground transportation -600,000 Research and development facilities -80,000 Administration -102,000 Transportation research board study +300,000 Equipment, operations, and hazardous materials .--The Committee recommends a funding level of $5,759,000 for this budget activity, an increase of $250,000 above the requested level. Within this funding, the Committee has deleted $100,000 associated with the diesel multiple units and light rail vehicle project element, and a reduction of $50,000 from equipment-related research. Operation Lifesaver .--Within the equipment, operations, and hazardous materials budget activity, the Committee recommends $600,000 to support Operation Lifesaver activities, which is $200,000 more than requested in the budget. This increase is necessary to ensure adequate assistance and support to the 49 State Operation Lifesaver programs. These moneys will be used for: providing appropriate and ongoing training and advisory services for State and regional coordinators, trainers, and presenters; developing and distributing generic public education materials and public service campaign materials for radio and print media; supporting State and community outreach, including materials for commercial drivers, law enforcement personnel, prosecutors and judges, and encouraging development of State and community trespass prevention programs. 1 800 emergency notification system .--The Committee maintains that FRA should proceed expeditiously with the development and evaluation of computer-based emergency response systems that will expedite notification of malfunctioning grade crossing signals, or track obstacles, such as trucks that have become hung-up on high-profile rail crossings. Such statewide systems are recommended by the National Transportation Safety Board as a means to warn railroads and local law enforcement of such problems, before they contribute to an accident. The $200,000 included by the Committee for this initiative within the equipment, operations, and hazardous materials budget activity will allow FRA to expand this project to allow participation of three States. Before the fiscal year 1999 budget is submitted to Congress, the Administrator shall provide the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations a research and technology transfer plan with definitive schedules delineating the process and timetable that will be used to complete this project and promote State investment in this approach to improve grade crossing safety. Track, structures, and train control .--The Committee has provided a funding level of $11,246,000 for the track, structures, and train control budget activity, an increase of $3,500,000 above the administration's request. The Committee has not provided the $500,000 requested for replacement and upgrade of the T 6 inspection railcar, but will consider without prejudice any proposed reprogramming action to provide the necessary funds within FRA's research and development office for this new equipment. Alaska Railroad positive train control demonstration project .--The Committee has provided $4,000,000 for a positive train control demonstration [PTC] project on the Alaska Railroad. The focus of the project should be on positive train separation and the protection of track crews and inspectors, as well as improved train performance and eliminating the need for construction of additional sidings. The Committee understands that the Alaska Railroad presents a uniquely suitable demonstration staging area, because it is simpler to implement PTC on the Alaska Railroad than on any other American rail system. The Alaska Railroad does not have any signaling system in place today--only grade crossing signals, and dispatching of trains is done exclusively with voice radio transmission of track warrants. Consequently, there is no debate on what the correct strategy to convert from current conventional signaling to PTC signaling. In addition, the Alaska Railroad already has a microwave communications system in place, and the State of Alaska Highway Department and the railroad have coordinated and integrated their respective microwave communications systems so that a failure at any one site on either will not interrupt the flow of messages. This redundancy increases the reliability of both systems and will assist the successful implementation of PTC. The Alaska Railroad PTC project will be the first regionwide installation of positive train control equipment, and the Alaska Railroad will be the first railroad totally PTC equipped. The project will be more than a demonstration--it will be a fully operational PTC system, providing the agency an invaluable baseline reference for other national positive train control system development projects. The $4,000,000 provided in the Senate mark will allow FRA and the railroad to develop and install computer-aided dispatching, which is phase 1 of the four-phase project. Safety of high-speed ground transportation .--This budget activity is increased by $50,000 above the fiscal year 1997 baseline. The Committee has deleted $500,000 associated with maglev systems cooperative research and $100,000 associated with environmental issues/impact analyses. Research and development facilities .--The Committee supports the agency's request to restore the FRA Transportation Technology Center [TTC] in Pueblo, CO, and has included the $350,000 requested to purchase or upgrade heavy equipment, laboratory instrumentation, and emergency support equipment at the TTC. The $80,000 for preliminary design for a project maintenance facility building is not included. Administration .--The administrative costs of the research and development program have grown significantly during the last 2 years. For example, fiscal year 1996 costs were $1,695,000; fiscal year 1997 costs are estimated at $2,181,000. In order to eliminate further growth in this area, the Committee is providing administration funding at the enacted level, $2,181,000, which is $102,000 below the amount requested. Transportation Research Board review .--The Transportation Research Board [TRB] Committee for an Assessment of Federal High Speed Ground Transportation R&D has provided useful recommendations on the Next Generation of High Speed Rail Program. Discussions with FRA indicate that TRB's advice has been welcome, appreciated, and useful. FRA should continue to adjust its budget submission to respond to the recommendations of the TRB panel. The Committee maintains that it would be beneficial to expand the purpose of the current TRB review to include a systematic analysis of the entire FRA research and development program. A reconstituted panel should also analyze the research and development management structure and approach and the current direction and allocation of moneys devoted to the various program areas. The questions of whether there is an appropriate balance of Federal, State, and private sector input and cost sharing and whether the directions and objectives outlined in FRA's 5-year strategic R&D plan are appropriate should be explored. Furthermore, the TRB panel should evaluate whether it is of critical importance to establish a Railroad Safety Institute, and whether such an institute would be duplicative of current research efforts. A focal point of this review should be to ascertain how the FRA research and development program could better serve the safety mission of the agency. The Committee maintains that periodic reports to FRA and to the Committee prior to markup would be especially useful. The Committee recommends $300,000 to support this initiative. NORTHEAST CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Appropriations, 1997 $175,000,000 Budget estimate, 1998 (\1\) Committee recommendation 273,450,000 \1\Requested funding of $200,000,000 for NECIP and $23,450,000 for Pennsylvania Station redevelopment is included in the proposed capital grants to the ``National Railroad Passengers Corporation (highway trust fund)'' appropriation. Title VII of the Railroad Revitalization and Regulatory Reform Act of 1976, as amended, created the Northeast corridor improvement project [NECIP] to upgrade and modernize the rail corridor between Washington, DC, and Boston, MA, the most heavily used rail passenger corridor in the Nation. Since 1976, some $3,775,000,000 has been invested by the Federal Government in the Northeast corridor. Amtrak is responsible for implementing the goals of NECIP, defined as regularly scheduled service between New York and Washington in under 3 hours and between New York and Boston in 3 hours. Over 200 million intercity and commuter rail passengers travel on some portions of the Northeast corridor rail line each year. Since 1991, funding for the project has focused on two areas: reduction in trip time between New York and Boston; and state-of-good-repair recapitalization of the railroad between New York and Washington. The New York-Boston project is scheduled to be completed by October 1999, following construction of the new electrification system between New Haven and Boston and the delivery of the first of 18 new high-speed trainsets. Many of the infrastructure improvements, necessary to permit up to 150-miles-per-hour speeds and facilitate increased growth on the rail line, have been designed and installed. Electrification construction work began on July 1, 1996, and is scheduled to be complete by the end of calendar year 1999. Amtrak projects that the operation of high-speed rail service on the Northeast corridor, made possible through the NECIP improvements, will enable it to generate net incremental revenues (after expenses and debt service) in excess of $168,000,000 in the year 2000. By 2001, Amtrak projects that ridership on the Northeast corridor will grow from the current level of 11,100,000 passengers per year to 14,700,000 passengers annually. Amtrak estimates that an additional $1,400,000,000 will be needed to finish the high-speed rail project between New York and Boston. COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION The Committee has provided $273,450,000 for the Northeast corridor improvement project, which includes $23,450,000 to complete the Federal share of funding for the Pennsylvania Station redevelopment project in New York City. This is $50,000,000 more for corridor improvements than requested by the administration. Pennsylvania Station redevelopment .--This redevelopment project makes safety and service improvements at the existing Pennsylvania Station, the Nation's busiest train station; and will convert a portion of the James A. Farley Post Office Building to be used as an intermodal station. This will greatly improve safety and circulation, and will provide significant new platform access, which will be necessary for both rail and transit passengers when the additional ridership generated by the new high-speed service is realized beginning in 1999. City, State, and private resources are being utilized in this cooperative redevelopment effort. The total cost of the project is estimated to be $315,000,000. The $23,450,000 provided by the Committee completes the Federal share of $100,000,000. On July 10, 1997, the Pennsylvania Station Redevelopment Corp.'s [PSRC] board voted unanimously to ratify funding agreements with all the project's funding partners: the New York City Economic Development Corp.; the New York State Department of Transportation; and the Federal Railroad Administration. In addition, funding has been provided to the PSRC by the Empire State Development Corp. At the PSRC board meeting, a revised project budget and schedule was also ratified, with construction (of early-action items such as the platform underneath the Farley Building) commencing in third quarter 1998, and completion of the entire construction project scheduled before the end of calendar year 2002. The Committee is confident that this new schedule and budget--as well as the clear separation of responsibilities between the PSRC, which is in charge of work at the Farley Building and Amtrak, which is in charge of the work in the existing Penn Station and all platform work--will help expedite the completion of the Pennsylvania Station redevelopment project. High-speed trainset safety and crashworthiness .--The Committee assigns the highest priority to passenger and crew safety and the crashworthiness of the trains to be used in the Northeast corridor high-speed rail project. Accordingly, the Committee expects that the equipment placed into service for this project meets or exceeds all of the safety and crashworthiness specification requirements, explicit or implicit. RAILROAD REHABILITATION AND IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Section 511 of Public Law 94 210, as amended authorizes obligation guarantees for meeting the long-term capital needs of private railroads. Railroads utilize this funding mechanism to finance major new facilities and rehabilitation or consolidation of current facilities. No appropriations or new loan guarantee commitments are proposed in fiscal year 1998 consistent with the budget request. NEXT GENERATION HIGH-SPEED RAIL Appropriations, 1997\1\ $24,757,000 Budget estimate, 1998 19,595,000 Committee recommendation 26,000,000 \1\Excludes reduction for TASC pursuant to section 321 of Public Law 104 205. The Committee has provided $26,000,000 in general fund appropriations for the high-speed ground transportation [HSGT] program. The amount provided is $6,405,000 more than the administration's request. The Committee first provided funding for the Next Generation High-Speed Rail Program in fiscal year 1995. The program is authorized by section 1036(a) of ISTEA and by the Swift Rail Development Act of 1994. The program funds HSGT research, development, and technology demonstration programs, as well as planning and analysis required to evaluate technology proposals under the program. The Committee has made the following adjustments to the administration's next generation high-speed rail programs: High-speed positive train control -$1,250,000 High-speed nonelectric locomotives +4,500,000 Grade crossing and innovative technologies +3,000,000 Track and structure technology -350,000 Planning technology +500,000 Administration +5,000 Within these program levels, the Committee recommends the following allocations: Flexible block control .--The Committee has reduced the administration's request for train control programs using flexible block control by $1,250,000, due to concerns that these funds might not readily be utilized by any of the existing or potential high-speed rail corridors. Much of the requested funding was to be used by the State of Illinois on the Chicago-St. Louis corridor for flexible block centralized control command systems demonstration. Due to recent freight rail mergers affecting the original corridor's route, the State is now negotiating with Chicago METRA to relocate the demonstration project. This may delay the project and the obligation of funds. ALPS hybrid flywheel-turbine .--The sum of $3,000,000 is provided for the design and development of a commercial locomotive prototype compatible with the flywheel propulsion system. The advanced locomotive propulsion system [ALPS] would permit more rapid acceleration of nonelectric locomotives, overcoming one of their major shortcomings. The ALPS hybrid flywheel-turbine project is a classic public sector research and development effort, incorporating the cooperation and expertise of the Federal Government, private industry, and academia. The project currently has a full-size rotor construction underway, and in May 1997, successfully tested a one-third scale rotor prototype. Prototype nonelectric high-speed locomotive .--The Committee recommends that FRA utilize the remaining $4,500,000 in the high-speed nonelectric locomotive activity on the design, development, and testing of different commercial nonelectric locomotive concepts that integrate to the greatest extent possible the best technologies currently being developed with those technologies under current development in the NGHSR Program, such as the flywheel motor/generator and power conversion system. RTL 3 turbo trains, State of New York .--The sum of $5,000,000 is provided to expedite the development, design, modernization and testing of next generation high-speed, lightweight trainsets for nonelectric corridors. Currently, one upgraded turboliner trainset is in revenue service on Amtrak's Empire corridor, which runs through the State from New York City to Buffalo. New York State DOT is seeking financing of up to $40,000,000 to upgrade the remainder of its fleet of seven turboliner trains, and the Committee anticipates that the funds provided herein will enable the State DOT to successfully leverage private financing for the balance of the necessary funds. These upgraded trainsets will safely and economically provide regular high-speed service at speeds of 110 to 125 miles per hour. Sealed corridor initiative .--Within the $7,500,000 funding level for the grade crossing and innovative technology activity, $4,000,000 is provided for the sealed corridor initiative, an ongoing project addressing the 130 grade crossings in the 92-mile Charlotte to Greensboro segment of North Carolina's proposed high-speed rail corridor between Charlotte and Raleigh. Of the remaining funds, the Committee believes that $1,000,000 should go toward the continuation of FRA's broad agency announcement approach to solicit a wide range of low cost, innovative high-speed rail grade crossing technologies. Planning technology .--The administration is directed to provide $500,000 to a State department of transportation to establish a consortium of States and other participants that would assist the FRA in advancing high-speed rail. Consistent with the recommendation of a panel of the Transportation Research Board, this forum would provide the States with a mechanism on a continuing basis to: (1) develop a strategic plan for research, development, demonstration, and deployment of high-speed rail technology; (2) conduct a peer review of the FRA's research and development program to provide direction on research subject areas and also program and project oversight; and (3) provide a means for advancing the States' common requirements for compatible and interoperable equipment and systems. The consortium should work toward creating a common market opportunity to meet the high-speed rail needs of the States and coordinating the planning process for high-speed rail deployment. ALASKA RAILROAD REHABILITATION Appropriations, 1997 $10,000,000 Budget estimate, 1998 ........................... Committee recommendation 17,000,000 The Committee has included a total of $17,000,000 for rail safety and infrastructure improvements benefiting passenger operations of the Alaska railroad. This railroad extends 470 miles from Seward through Anchorage, the largest city in Alaska, to the interior town of Fairbanks. It carries both passengers and freight, and provides a critical transportation link for passengers and cargo traveling through difficult terrain and harsh climatic conditions. Within the funds provided, $7,000,000 will be utilized to expand and improve the Seward Dock, the southernmost terminus of the railroad and an important intermodal transfer point on the Alaska Marine Highway System. The State of Alaska, the city of Seward, the Alaska Railroad, and cruise ship lines that utilize the port will provide significant cost-share funding toward completion of the project this fiscal year. The remaining $10,000,000 will go toward general upgrade and maintenance of the railroad's track, equipment, railbed and rolling stock. RHODE ISLAND RAIL DEVELOPMENT Appropriations, 1997 $7,000,000 Budget estimate, 1998 10,000,000 Committee recommendation 10,000,000 For fiscal year 1997, Congress appropriated $7,000,000 to fund construction of a third track on the Northeast corridor between Davisville and Central Falls, RI, with sufficient clearance to accommodate double stack freight cars. The appropriation act stipulated that the State of Rhode Island or its designee provide matching funds on a dollar-for-dollar basis, and that the Providence & Worcester [P&W] Railroad, which would benefit from the third track, enter into an agreement with the Secretary to reimburse Amtrak and/or FRA up to $13,000,000 for damages stemming from certain potential legal actions brought by the P&W. For fiscal year 1998, the administration proposes to continue funding this project, with a dollar-for-dollar matching requirement of the State of Rhode Island or its designee and a requirement that the P&W enter into an agreement with the Secretary to reimburse Amtrak and/or FRA up to $13,000,000 for damages stemming from certain potential legal actions brought by the P&W. The Committee is providing $10,000,000 to continue the Rhode Island rail development project, the same amount as requested by the administration. Fiscal year 1998 will be the fourth year that Federal funds are appropriated for the Rhode Island rail development project. The total amount in Federal funds received thus far is $13,000,000. Total cost of the project over the planned 6-year schedule is somewhere between $110,000,000 and $120,000,000, with a required 50 percent match of Federal funds. In November 1996, the State of Rhode Island passed a $62,000,000 bond referendum, of which $50,000,000 is guaranteed for the rail redevelopment project. The major components of the project include rehabilitation/construction of a freight-dedicated third track, and modification of bridges and other structures to provide sufficient vertical clearance to accommodate modern freight equipment, and horizontal clearance to accommodate the freight-dedicated track. DIRECT LOAN FINANCING PROGRAM Loan subsidy appropriation Limitation on direct loans Appropriations, 1997 $58,680,000 Budget estimate, 1998 Committee recommendation The administration has not requested any funds under section 505 of the Rail Revitalization and Regulatory Reform Act of 1976 as all funds to complete the project were provided in 1997. This project involves the elimination of over 200 at-grade-highway crossings along a 20-mile rail corridor in order to improve access to the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. GRANTS TO NATIONAL RAILROAD PASSENGER CORPORATION (AMTRAK) Appropriations, 1997\1\ $587,950,000 Budget estimate, 1998\1\ \2\789,450,000 Committee recommendation 344,000,000 \1\Includes $142,000,000 for mandatory passenger rail payments in fiscal year 1997 and $142,000,000 in fiscal year 1998. \2\1998 funding to be derived from the highway trust fund. The National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) was established in 1971 to preserve and improve the Nation's intercity rail passenger system. Since the passage of the Rail Passenger Service Act in 1971, Amtrak and Amtrak-related accounts have been appropriated $20,305,800,000 in Federal funds. Since the beginning, Amtrak has been directed to maximize its revenues and minimize Government subsidies. The Corporation has consistently reported to Congress that it is moving toward self-sufficiency and zero Federal operating support. However, in the 26 years Amtrak has been in existence, the railroad has never once generated an annual profit. In fact, only one route on Amtrak's system--the Metroliner, which runs from Union Station in Washington, DC, to Pennsylvania Station in New York City--generates more revenue than it costs to operate. For fiscal year 1998, Amtrak has requested a total of $1,138,000,000 in Federal funds. Of this amount, $751,000,000 is requested for capital expenses (including an unspecified amount for the Northeast Corridor Improvement Program), and $387,000,000 is requested for operating expenses and railroad retirement expenses. Since the railroad received a total of $364,500,000 in fiscal year 1997 operating expenses, it is difficult for the Committee to understand how this proposed increase reflects a step forward on Amtrak's glidepath to self-sufficiency. The administration has requested a total of $789,450,000 for Amtrak in fiscal year 1998. Of this amount, $445,450,000 is requested for capital expenses (including $200,000,000 for the Northeast Corridor Improvement Program and $23,450,000 to complete the Federal portion of the Pennsylvania Station redevelopment project). A discussion of the Committee's funding recommendations for NECIP and Penn Station are included under the Northeast Corridor Improvement Program header. For operating expenses, the administration requests $344,000,000. For fiscal year 1998, the administration has requested that Amtrak operating and capital funds be appropriated from the highway trust fund. There is no current authorization to fund Amtrak from the highway trust fund, and the Committee asserts that it would not be appropriate to pay for passenger rail costs out of a fund which is comprised of automobile gasoline tax receipts and other motor vehicle excise taxes. The Committee has provided a total funding level of $344,000,000 for Amtrak operating expenses, with the assumption that capital funding for Amtrak will be provided through a new separate account. The Committee is concerned that the Amtrak Federal grant request and the Federal Railroad Administration's budget justification for Amtrak do not provide sufficient information for the Committee to have a clear understanding of the railroad's budget request. The Committee will work with OMB, DOT, Amtrak, and the House Appropriations Committee to develop a clearer, more informative, and more accurate depiction of Amtrak operating needs for the fiscal year 1999 budget cycle. Needed reforms .--Amtrak is struggling under a huge debt load. In 1996, the combined debt and capital lease obligations for which the company was responsible totaled $986,900,000. Servicing this debt is taken off the top of Amtrak's operating revenues--in 1996, the interest paid on the Corporation's debts was $60,200,000. The Committee is concerned that, as Amtrak assumes more debt as the railroad acquires more capital equipment, the total debt load and level of interest expense will continue to rise dramatically. The Committee is also concerned that Amtrak has transferred Federal capital appropriations to pay these interest expenses. This practice is contrary to accepted financial standards, and appears inconsistent with Amtrak's own statements that capital investment is of paramount importance to the railroad's future. It appears to the Committee that Amtrak is digging a hole for itself and the American taxpayers, and the hole is getting deeper every year. In addition to the problems of the Corporation's solvency and the presentation of mandatory passenger rail payments, Amtrak is subject to labor provisions that affect only railroads and their employees. These legislative labor provisions include the Federal Employer's Liability Act, which is a fault-based workers' compensation system governing compensation for employee on-duty injuries; the Railway Labor Act (which also applies to airlines), governing labor relations issues of employee representation, dispute resolution, and negotiation of contracts; the Railroad Retirement Act, governing railroad employee retirement; and Rail Passenger Service Act provisions governing employee protective conditions and restricting Amtrak's ability to contract out services. It is the Committee's strongly held position that, although members differ on what reforms should be made, these issues must be addressed this year because, according to Amtrak's own testimony, it is unlikely that the railroad will survive through fiscal year 1998, even if funded at the administration's requested level. And even more importantly, while we cannot recover the more than $20,000,000,000 in appropriated funds that have already been lost while waiting for Amtrak to turn itself around, it is imperative that these difficult and complex issues be squarely faced now, so that we do not further compound the taxpayers' losses. There are currently many different legislative proposals to reform and restructure Amtrak, and to make the railroad more accountable. The House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee formed a working group on Amtrak, or a blue ribbon panel, that recently announced its recommendations. The Senate Commerce Committee reported out its reauthorization bill, Senate bill 738, the Amtrak Reform and Accountability Act of 1997, on June 26. The House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Subcommittee on Railroads is working on its Amtrak reauthorization proposal, as well. And the House Appropriations Committee included a provision in their fiscal year 1998 Transportation appropriations bill that establishes an independent commission to conduct an economic analysis of the entire Amtrak system and make recommendations on route closings and realignments. The Committee commends the good-faith efforts of the Finance, Budget, and authorizing committees in both the House and Senate to address the many serious problems facing Amtrak. The Committee cannot endorse all of the proposals being put forward, but seeks to aggressively pursue real, workable solutions for the future of Amtrak that are realistic and make economic sense. AEmdbo AF AEmdnm AFCapital expenses. AEmdbo AF AEmdnm AF--The Committee has not provided any funds for Amtrak capital expenses. On June 27, 1997, the Senate approved a $2,300,000,000 intercity passenger rail reserve fund during consideration of Senate bill 949, the Revenue Reconciliation Act of 1997. Subtitle L--``Intercity Passenger Rail Fund'', in title VII of Senate bill 949 establishes a fund, subject to appropriations, that is designed to be equivalent to the amount generated by one-half cent of revenues from the gasoline tax. If the rail reserve fund mechanism is retained through conference and enacted, and the funds are subsequently appropriated, the fiscal year 1998 reserve fund allocation will be $641,000,000, available for Amtrak capital expenses. In light of the strength of the Senate vote on this issue, it appears that the Senate conferees have a mandate to strenuously advocate retaining the reserve fund in reconciliation. The Committee has included legislative language that provides for the release of these reserve funds to Amtrak, contingent upon (1) inclusion of the above-specified intercity passenger rail reserve in the enacted version of the Revenue Reconciliation Act, and (2) the subsequent increase of the transportation subcommittee's discretionary allocation in both budget authority and associated outlays for all fiscal year 1998 costs associated with the $641,000,000 in capital grants. The Secretary of Transportation will release these funds to Amtrak, whereupon they may be used for capital purposes, including: the acquisition of equipment, rolling stock, and other capital improvements; the upgrade of maintenance facilities; and the maintenance of existing equipment currently in intercity passenger rail service. In addition, these capital funds may be used for the payment of interest and principal on obligations incurred for these new capital investments. FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION SUMMARY OF FISCAL YEAR 1998 PROGRAM The Federal Transit Administration was established as a component of the Department of Transportation by Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1968, effective July 1, 1968, which transferred most of the functions and programs under the Federal Transit Act of 1964, as amended (78 Stat. 302; 49 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.), from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The missions of the Federal Transit Administration are: to assist in the development of improved mass transportation facilities, equipment, techniques, and methods; to encourage the planning and establishment of urban mass transportation services needed for economical and desirable urban development; to provide mobility for transit dependents; to maximize productivity of urban transportation systems; and to provide assistance to State and local governments and their instrumentalities in financing such services and systems. The current authorization for many of the programs funded by the Federal Transit Administration is contained in the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act, which expires at the end of fiscal year 1997. The Committee's recommendation is based on current law. The Committee encourages the appropriate legislative committees to reauthorize the transit programs before the end of the fiscal year to avoid unnecessary interruption in providing assistance to transit systems across the Nation. Funding for the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority is authorized under Public Law 101 551. Direct appropriations are required for the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority. Under the Committee recommendation, a total program level of $4,684,747,000 would be provided for the programs of the Federal Transit Administration for fiscal year 1998. This is $101,429,000 more than the budget request. The following table summarizes the Committee's recommendations compared to fiscal year 1997 and the administration's request: [In thousands of dollars] Program 1997 enacted\1\ 1998 estimate Committee recommendation Administrative expenses \2\41,497 47,018 41,497 Formula grants\3\ 2,149,185 3,498,500 2,400,000 Discretionary grants\4\ 1,900,000 650,000 2,000,000 Transit planning and research 85,500 91,800 77,250 University transportation centers 6,000 6,000 Washington Metro 200,000 200,000 160,000 ----------------- --------------- -------------------------- Total 4,382,182 4,487,318 4,684,747 \1\Excludes reductions for TASC and awards pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. \2\An additional $780,000 was made available from formula grants balances. \3\Includes limitation on obligations of $1,659,185,000 in fiscal year 1997, $3,409,500,000 in fiscal year 1998 estimate, and $1,910,000,000 in Committee recommendation. \4\Limitation on obligations. ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES Appropriations, 1997 \1\$41,497,000 Budget estimate, 1998 47,018,000 Committee recommendation 41,497,000 \1\Excludes reductions for TASC and awards pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. An additional $780,000 was made available from formula grants balances. The Committee recommends a total of $41,497,000 in general funds for administrative expenses. The administration's request funded administrative expenses from the ``Mass transit'' account of the highway trust fund beginning in fiscal year 1998. Project management oversight activities, section 23 .--The Committee has included bill language that limits to $15,000,000 the amount of funds that may be withheld from transit capital grants to conduct oversight activities in fiscal year 1998. The FTA's Project Management Oversight Program is intended to inform and assist FTA management and FTA grantees in carrying out their individual responsibilities as stewards of public funds under the Federal transit law. The Project Management Oversight Program encompasses project management oversight of major capital projects, and safety, procurement, management, and financial compliance reviews and audits of FTA grantees. A recent inspector general's audit has revealed, however, that the FTA has allocated significant resources of section 23 funds for numerous management initiatives which are not eligible for section 23 funding. In addition, the inspector general's audit determined that available section 23 funds were significantly underutilized because FTA annually apportions the maximum section 23 funds allowed by law but obligates significantly less than the total available funds. The Committee's action to limit the amount of withheld project management oversight funds to $15,000,000 in fiscal year 1998 will help to ensure that section 23 funds are used only for purposes intended by Congress. Further, the Committee's action will ensure that capital grants are more fully applied to capital, operating, and planning assistance while ensuring that critical project management oversight and financial reviews of FTA's grantees are performed. Further, the Committee directs that the FTA submit with its annual budget submission a detailed program plan by activity and detailed justification of its oversight program, similar to the format of the Department's ITS justifications. TOTAL FORMULA AND DISCRETIONARY TRANSIT FUNDS, BY STATE The following table shows a complete display of formula and discretionary transit funds, broken out by State, under the Committee's funding recommendations. FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION FISCAL YEAR 1998 APPORTIONMENTS FOR FORMULA PROGRAMS AND DISCRETIONARY PROGRAMS (BY STATE) State Section 5307 urbanized area formula apportionment Section 5311 nonurbanized formula apportionment Section 5320 elderly and persons with disabilities apportionment Section 5309 fixed guideway modernization apportionment Section 5338-- Total Discretionary grants bus and bus facilities Discretionary grants--new systems Alabama $10,788,162 $3,073,404 $1,050,450 $39,000,000 $53,912,016 Alaska 1,740,780 458,311 179,394 2,378,485 America Samoa 65,324 52,142 117,466 Arizona 24,730,174 1,345,455 928,131 $711,445 27,715,205 Arkansas 3,837,824 2,457,059 738,975 7,033,858 California 346,548,067 5,996,879 5,617,284 70,552,284 17,700,000 $105,800,000 552,214,514 Colorado 25,907,108 1,280,094 723,634 827,504 11,000,000 32,000,000 71,738,340 Connecticut 34,799,726 1,161,166 826,776 32,745,354 7,500,000 2,000,000 79,033,022 Delaware 4,382,795 289,683 262,309 351,119 5,285,905 District of Columbia 20,723,986 260,487 19,324,579 4,000,000 44,309,052 Florida 107,021,219 3,855,059 3,795,947 5,939,122 14,000,000 43,800,000 178,411,347 Georgia 38,843,522 4,493,643 1,357,175 7,991,349 5,000,000 44,600,000 102,285,690 Guam 185,961 132,123 318,084 Hawaii 18,425,436 504,343 329,148 284,897 10,000,000 29,543,824 Idaho 2,277,192 1,017,497 336,450 3,631,139 Illinois 156,418,110 4,122,667 2,459,693 99,427,493 30,000,000 292,427,964 Indiana 24,528,307 3,982,403 1,298,444 6,673,769 4,000,000 7,500,000 47,982,923 Iowa 6,472,783 2,561,521 793,176 8,000,000 17,827,480 Kansas 6,012,057 2,037,609 667,649 2,000,000 10,717,315 Kentucky 12,242,080 3,363,647 1,007,405 16,613,132 Louisiana 20,420,754 2,781,979 1,010,609 2,158,866 8,000,000 34,372,208 Maine 1,633,570 1,342,414 416,501 3,392,485 Maryland 57,315,126 1,675,939 1,015,310 16,121,771 10,000,000 35,000,000 121,128,145 Massachusetts 83,983,722 1,796,097 1,455,067 53,675,525 4,000,000 48,200,000 193,110,411 Michigan 45,575,278 4,864,138 2,106,852 144,843 52,691,111 Minnesota 21,753,220 2,799,031 1,029,391 2,042,096 3,000,000 30,623,738 Mississippi 3,510,335 2,731,491 718,402 4,000,000 3,000,000 13,960,228 Missouri 25,168,250 3,260,150 1,316,530 1,410,305 32,000,000 500,000 63,655,235 Montana 1,723,154 824,253 310,060 2,857,467 Nebraska 6,241,561 1,243,693 475,643 7,960,897 Nevada 11,088,102 406,047 358,126 8,000,000 5,000,000 24,852,275 New Hampshire 2,414,281 1,075,106 339,246 3,828,633 New Jersey 131,820,444 1,537,173 1,743,557 68,717,902 12,000,000 91,000,000 306,819,077 New Mexico 5,167,051 1,208,451 420,326 11,800,000 18,595,828 New York 395,861,766 5,411,034 4,018,203 268,706,682 47,050,000 50,500,000 771,547,685 North Carolina 19,356,066 5,748,117 1,541,198 8,600,000 14,000,000 49,245,381 North Dakota 1,679,747 609,572 266,417 2,555,736 Northern Marianas 60,536 51,956 112,492 Ohio 63,172,942 5,851,983 2,566,250 12,520,503 12,500,000 800,000 97,411,678 Oklahoma 8,224,811 2,501,662 871,636 2,000,000 13,598,109 Oregon 18,896,137 1,986,342 811,526 1,228,479 2,000,000 63,400,000 88,322,484 Pennsylvania 108,969,938 6,527,948 3,073,497 89,771,005 15,000,000 8,000,000 231,342,388 Puerto Rico 35,234,014 1,950,756 770,699 737,398 38,692,867 Rhode Island 7,327,945 249,895 372,551 1,006,505 8,956,896 South Carolina 8,757,317 2,876,961 843,089 11,000,000 3,000,000 26,477,367 South Dakota 1,211,718 743,020 286,367 4,500,000 6,741,105 Tennessee 16,250,512 3,713,828 1,237,314 31,152 15,000,000 1,000,000 37,232,807 Texas 115,479,885 7,840,921 3,173,722 2,882,642 23,900,000 70,100,000 223,377,171 Utah 15,324,387 563,250 392,833 13,400,000 92,000,000 121,680,470 Vermont 608,974 664,324 239,619 4,750,000 8,000,000 14,262,917 Virgin Islands 142,187 134,045 276,232 Virginia 43,600,229 3,292,668 1,286,505 487,388 2,000,000 50,666,790 Washington 58,118,297 2,307,131 1,155,525 7,409,848 22,000,000 24,000,000 114,990,801 West Virginia 2,935,925 1,961,727 620,551 28,000,000 33,518,203 Wisconsin 25,336,924 3,389,634 1,179,382 268,174 15,000,000 45,174,114 Wyoming 841,417 474,078 206,313 1,521,808 -------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------ ----------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------- --------------- Subtotal 2,210,703,129 128,665,261 60,631,610 774,150,000 440,000,000 780,000,000 4,399,050,000 Section 23 set-aside 10,121,004 589,053 5,850,000 16,560,057 -------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------ ----------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------- --------------- Total 2,220,824,133 129,254,314 60,631,610 780,000,000 440,000,000 780,000,000 4,415,610,057 FORMULA GRANTS Appropriation (general fund) Limitation (trust fund) Appropriations, 1997 $490,000,000 $1,659,185,000 Budget estimate, 1998 3,409,500,000 Committee recommendation 90,000,000 2,310,000,000 The Formula Grant Program has funded sections 5307, 5310(a)2, 5311, and 5336, providing grants on the basis of a formula to State and local agencies for mass transportation operating and capital expenses. The Committee recommends $2,400,000,000 for continuation of the Formula Grant Program including $128,665,261 for the section 5311 Nonurban Formula Program; $60,631,610 for the section 5310 Elderly and Disabled Program, and $2,210,703,129 for the section 5307, Urban Formula Grants Program. The administration's request proposes to fund formula programs from the ``Mass transit'' account of the highway trust fund and to combine funding for bus and bus-related activities and fixed guideway modernization into formula programs, with funds made available for fixed guideway modernization to be distributed by the current statutory formula. In addition, the administration request would move the rural transit assistance program funding to the ``Formula programs'' account from the ``Transit planning and research'' account. Both the Committee's and the administration's requests propose to allow preventive maintenance and other activities to be funded as a capital expense. Operating assistance would no longer be an eligible expense in areas greater than 200,000 in population. However, in smaller areas under 200,000 in population, all formula assistance could be used for any eligible transit purpose, including capital, planning and operating costs. Paratransit requirements under the Americans with Disabilities Act [ADA] .--The Americans with Disabilities Act [ADA] requires that transit operators offer paratransit service, as well as accessible fixed route service, to persons with disabilities. The requirement to provide paratransit services to those passengers unable to use fixed-route transit service becomes effective January 26, 1997. The legislative intent of the ADA that fixed route public transit operators provide complementary paratransit services for eligible persons with disabilities did not assume the transfer to public transit operators of the financial burden of carrying persons with disabilities whose transportation costs have traditionally been funded by Department of Health and Human Services [DHHS] programs. Therefore, the Committee has an interest in ensuring that the existing human services transportation programs funded through DHHS not be eliminated or consolidated without an adequate and ongoing financial commitment by DHHS to pay for the transportation costs of their clients whether such transportation is provided by traditional human services transportation networks or by ADA complementary paratransit services. The Committee reiterates its position that, in order to most effectively implement the paratransit requirements of the ADA, the Department of Transportation should closely coordinate its efforts with those of the Department of Health and Human Services. The Committee believes that coordination of transportation for persons with disabilities, seniors, and others funded by DHHS programs or by public transit operators under their ADA complementary paratransit obligations must be planned and implemented at the State and regional levels in order to ensure cost-effective service delivery and improve access to DHHS program services. Federal guidelines to facilitate such coordination planning will provide assistance to public transit operators, community transportation providers, and human service transportation providers to achieve coordination objectives. In addition, a uniform cost accounting system is key to fostering coordination among the myriad Federal programs which fund transportation in order to streamline the payment for the administration of services funded by each program. The Committee directs the Secretary of Transportation, working with the Secretary of Health and Human Services through the DOT/DHHS Coordinating Council, to develop these guidelines for State and regional planning to achieve specific transportation coordination objectives including, but not limited to: joint identification of human service client transportation needs and the appropriate mix of transportation services to meet those needs; the expanded use of public transit services to deliver human services program transportation; and cost-sharing arrangements for DHHS program clients transported by ADA paratransit systems based on a uniform accounting system. UNIVERSITY TRANSPORTATION CENTERS Appropriations, 1997 $6,000,000 Budget estimate, 1998 ........................... Committee recommendation 6,000,000 Section 5317(b) of title 49 U.S.C. provides for the university transportation centers program. The purpose of the university transportation centers program is to become a national resource and focal point for the support and conduct of research and training concerning the transportation of passengers and property. The administration's request proposes to fund university transportation centers under the ``Transit planning and research'' account. The Committee has approved $6,000,000 for the university transportation centers program, the same level as provided in fiscal year 1997. TRANSIT PLANNING AND RESEARCH Appropriations, 1997 $85,500,000 Budget estimate, 1998 91,800,000 Committee recommendation 77,250,000 The Committee has recommended $77,250,000 for transit planning and research. The bill contains language specifying that $39,500,000 shall be available for the metropolitan planning program; $4,500,000 for the rural transit assistance program; $22,000,000 for the national program; $8,250,000 for the State program; and $3,000,000 for the National Transit Institute. Under the national component of the program, the Federal Transit Administration is a catalyst in the research, development, and deployment of transportation methods and technologies addressing such issues as accessibility for the disabled, air quality, and traffic congestion service and operational improvements. Funds for the State and local component of the program will ensure that all localities have sufficient funds to improve the State and local planning process and to participate in research efforts with regional applications. The administration's request proposes to fund the rural transit assistance program under formula programs and include university transportation centers under this ``Transit planning and research'' account. The following table summarizes the Committee recommendation: Fiscal year 1997 program level Fiscal year 1998 budget estimate Committee recommendation Metropolitan planning $39,500,000 $39,500,000 $39,500,000 Rural transit assistance program 4,500,000 4,500,000 State planning and research program 8,250,000 8,250,000 8,250,000 Transit cooperative research program 8,250,000 8,250,000 National Transit Institute 3,000,000 3,000,000 3,000,000 National planning and research program 22,000,000 26,800,000 22,000,000 University transportation centers 6,000,000 -------------------------------- ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Total 85,500,000 91,800,000 77,250,000 The Committee has provided funding for a number of important initiatives in fiscal year 1997. They are as follows: Fuel Cell Transit Bus Program .--The Committee directs the FTA to provide $4,000,000 to continue the advancement of the Fuel Cell Transit Bus Program. Project ACTION .--The Committee provides $2,000,000 to continue Project ACTION (accessible community transportation in our Nation), which is administered by the National Easter Seal Society through a cooperative agreement with the FTA. Zinc-air battery .--The Committee provides $2,000,000 for zinc-air research and for a demonstration of zinc-air battery applications in heavy-duty vehicles. Low-speed magnetic levitation. --The Committee directs the FTA to provide $1,000,000 for the continued development of low-speed magnetic levitation technology for a downtown urban area shuttle in Pittsburgh, PA. Honolulu congestion study .--The Committee is aware of the island of Oahu's severe traffic congestion and the urgent need to explore transportation alternatives. The Committee supports Federal funding for a 2-year effort by the city and county of Honolulu to undertake a comprehensive transportation investment analysis to develop and evaluate mobility alternatives for Honolulu's primary urban corridor from Ewa to east Honolulu. TRUST FUND SHARE OF TRANSIT PROGRAMS (Liquidation of Contract Authorization) (highway trust fund) Appropriations, 1997 ($1,920,000,000) Budget estimate, 1998 ...........................06 Committee recommendation (2,310,000,000) Under ISTEA, Public Law 102 240, four transit accounts can be funded from the mass transit account of the highway trust fund, the general fund, or a mix of the two. Consistent with current law, the Committee proposes funding only formula grants with both trust and general funds. Administrative expenses, university transportation centers, and planning and research will be funded only with general funding. DISCRETIONARY GRANTS (Limitation on Obligations) (Highway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1997 ($1,900,000,000) Budget estimate, 1998 (650,000,000) Committee recommendation (2,000,000,000) Section 5338(b) of 49 U.S.C. authorizes discretionary grants or loans to States and local public bodies and agencies thereof to be used in financing mass transportation investments. Under the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, Public Law 102 240, investments may include construction of new fixed guideway systems; extensions to existing guideway systems; major bus fleet expansions; and fixed guideway expenditures for existing older systems. The administration's request proposes to combine the funding for bus and bus-related activities and fixed guideway modernization with the formula programs. Therefore, only new fixed guideway systems or extensions--major capital investments--would be funded in this account. The Committee recommends a level of $2,000,000,000. The following table summarizes the Committee recommendations: [In thousands of dollars] 1997 program level Fiscal year 1998 budget estimate Committee recommendations Bus and bus facilities 380,000 440,000 Fixed guideway modernization 760,000 780,000 New systems and new extensions 760,000 650,000 780,000 -------------------- ---------------------------------- --------------------------- Total 1,900,000 650,000 2,000,000 Three-year availability of section 3 discretionary funds .--The Committee has redistributed unallocated discretionary bus and new starts funds from projects which were funded in the fiscal year 1995 Transportation appropriations bill (Public Law 103 331) and previous acts making these funds available for reallocation in fiscal year 1998. As in previous years, a general provision (sec. 316) is included which limits funding availability for these fiscal year 1998 discretionary funds to 3 years from enactment. BUS AND BUS FACILITIES Due to budget constraints, the Committee is unable to fund many meritorious bus and bus facilities projects. This action was taken without prejudice. The Committee expects to give full consideration to all projects mentioned in the House and Senate reports during conference committee deliberations on the Fiscal Year 1998 Transportation Appropriations Act. Alternative fueled buses .--Those transit systems in the State of New York receiving section 3 bus discretionary allocations in areas over 200,000 population for the express purpose of providing fixed-route transit services, are directed to purchase alternative fueled buses. Vehicles purchased for use in urbanized areas under 200,000 population and for use in rural areas and/or for ADA mandated paratransit services would be exempted. The Committee further directs that the entire amount made available for the State of New Jersey for bus and bus facilities under this account shall be used exclusively for the purchase of alternative fuel buses. The recommended amount includes the following allocations: Committee State/city and project description recommendation Alabama: $12,000,000 10,000,000 1,000,000 2,000,000 3,000,000 6,000,000 3,000,000 2,000,000 California: 1,000,000 2,200,000 3,500,000 9,000,000 2,000,000 Colorado: Colorado Association of Transit Agencies, buses and equipment 11,000,000 Connecticut: Bridgeport intermodal center 7,500,000 District of Columbia: Fuel cell bus facilities 4,000,000 Florida: 1,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 5,000,000 4,000,000 Georgia: Atlanta MARTA compressed natural gas buses 5,000,000 Hawaii: Honolulu buses and facility 10,000,000 Indiana: Indianapolis Public Transportation Corp. buses 4,000,000 Iowa: 5,500,000 2,500,000 Kansas: Johnson County bus maintenance/operations facility 2,000,000 Louisiana: 5,000,000 3,000,000 Maryland: Mass Transit Administration buses and facilities 10,000,000 Massachusetts: 1,000,000 3,000,000 Minnesota: St. Paul, Snelling bus garage 3,000,000 Mississippi: Jackson bus facility 4,000,000 Missouri: 7,000,000 9,000,000 16,000,000 Nevada: Las Vegas Citizens Area Transit system, vehicles 8,000,000 New Jersey: NJ Transit alternative fuel buses 12,000,000 New Mexico: 1,000,000 1,300,000 7,500,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 New York: 4,000,000 4,300,000 3,750,000 10,000,000 10,000,000 15,000,000 North Carolina: 1,600,000 7,000,000 Ohio: Statewide bus and bus facility projects 12,500,000 Oregon: 1,000,000 1,000,000 Pennsylvania: 2,000,000 2,000,000 3,000,000 8,000,000 South Carolina: 4,000,000 6,000,000 1,000,000 South Dakota: Statewide bus and bus facilities 4,500,000 Tennessee: Statewide bus and bus facilities projects 15,000,000 Texas: 3,000,000 3,900,000 4,000,000 6,000,000 5,000,000 2,000,000 Utah: 4,000,000 400,000 4,000,000 5,000,000 Vermont: 3,000,000 1,750,000 Virginia: Richmond multimodal center 2,000,000 Washington: 2,000,000 3,000,000 1,000,000 3,000,000 3,000,000 10,000,000 West Virginia: 9,500,000 18,500,000 Wisconsin: 2,000,000 13,000,000 FIXED GUIDEWAY MODERNIZATION The Committee recommends a total of $780,000,000 for the modernization of existing rail transit systems. Under ISTEA all of the funds are distributed by formula. The following table itemizes the fiscal year 1997 rail modernization allocations by State: Fixed guideway modernization apportionments State Apportionment Arizona $711,445 California 70,552,284 Colorado 827,504 Connecticut 32,745,354 Delaware 351,119 District of Columbia 19,324,579 Florida 5,939,122 Georgia 7,991,349 Hawaii 284,897 Illinois 99,427,493 Indiana 6,673,769 Louisiana 2,158,866 Maryland 16,121,771 Massachusetts 53,675,525 Michigan 144,843 Minnesota 2,042,096 Missouri 1,410,305 New Jersey 68,717,902 New York 268,706,682 Ohio 12,520,503 Oregon 1,228,479 Pennsylvania 89,771,005 Puerto Rico 737,398 Rhode Island 1,006,505 Tennessee 31,152 Texas 2,882,642 Virginia 487,388 Washington 7,409,848 Wisconsin 268,174 774,150,000 Section 23 set-aside 5,850,000 780,000,000 NEW SYSTEMS The bill includes $780,000,000 of new authority for new starts. These funds are available for preliminary engineering, right-of-way acquisition, project management, oversight, and construction for new systems and extensions. According to specific project needs, these funds shall also be available for preliminary stages of projects named for funding. The funds are to be distributed as follows: Atlanta North Springs $44,600,000 Austin Capital Metro 1,000,000 BART San Francisco Airport and San Jose Tasman extensions 34,500,000 Boston piers (MOS 2) project 46,200,000 Boston urban ring 2,000,000 Burlington-Essex, VT, commuter rail 8,000,000 Canton-Akron-Cleveland commuter rail project 800,000 Charleston monobeam rail project 3,000,000 Cincinnati Northeast/Northern Kentucky Rail Line project 500,000 Clark County, NV, RTC fixed guideway 5,000,000 DART north central light rail extension 14,000,000 Denver southwest corridor LRT 30,000,000 East Side access project, New York 50,000,000 Florida tricounty commuter rail 12,000,000 Galveston rail trolley system 4,000,000 Griffin light rail project, Hartford, CT 2,000,000 Hollis to Ketchikan ferry -6,345,000 Houston METRO regional bus plan 51,100,000 Indianapolis northeast corridor 1,500,000 Jackson, MS, intermodal corridor 3,000,000 Los Angeles Metro Rail MOS 3 51,000,000 MARC commuter rail 35,000,000 Memphis regional rail plan 1,000,000 Nassau hub rail link EIS 500,000 New Jersey urban core: 64,000,000 27,000,000 New Orleans Canal Street corridor project 4,000,000 North Carolina Research Triangle Park 14,000,000 Northern Indiana South Shore commuter rail 6,000,000 Oklahoma City MAPS corridor transit system 2,000,000 Orlando Lynx light rail project 31,800,000 Pittsburgh busway projects 8,000,000 Portland Westside LRT project 63,400,000 Roaring Fork Valley rail 2,000,000 Sacramento LRT extension 20,300,000 Salt Lake City: 84,000,000 8,000,000 Seattle-Tacoma light rail and commuter rail 24,000,000 Springfield-Branson, MO commuter rail 500,000 St. Louis METRO Link/St. Clair extension project 30,000,000 PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS Atlanta-MARTA North Line extension. --The Committee recommends $44,600,000 for the Atlanta-MARTA North Line extension project. This 1.9-mile, two-station extension from the Dunwoody Station to North Springs is part of the larger 9 mile, five station North Line extension to the MARTA heavy rail rapid transit system. The segment from Buckhead to Dunwoody opened in June 1996. The North Line extension will serve the rapidly growing area north of Atlanta, and will connect this area with the rest of the region by providing better transit service for both commuters and inner-city residents. The local share commitment for the federally funded portion of this extension is 20 percent. The cost-effectiveness index is $5 per new passenger trip. FTA has determined that the grantee has the financial capacity to build and operate this project. An FFGA for the Dunwoody to North Springs segment was issued in December 1994 which fulfilled the requirements of section 3035(tt) of ISTEA. The FFGA provides for $305,000,000 in new starts funds, including $52,110,000 in fiscal year 1998. However, $44,600,000 has been requested by the administration in fiscal year 1998, with the remaining $96,720,000 of the FFGA to be provided over fiscal years 1999 2001. To date, $99,730,000 has been obligated to the entire project with only the fiscal year 1997 appropriation remaining unobligated. The 1.9-mile federally funded segment of the North Line extension (Medical Center to North Springs) received an ISTEA earmark of $318,760,000. Austin Capital Metro .--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for Austin Capital Metro for planning and design work on the proposed light rail project in north Austin, to serve the central business district, the State capitol, and the rapidly growing population and employment centers of the city. Capital Metro and the Texas Department of Transportation have recently completed a major investment study which identifies the highest priority corridor for fixed guideway transit development, and are attempting to determine the locally preferred transit strategy. San Francisco Bart extension to the airport project/San Jose Tasman LRT project .--Local officials in the San Francisco area have proposed a four-station, 6.4-mile extension of the bay area transit [BART] system from Colma to an intermodal station serving the San Francisco International Airport. The proposed route would serve the cities of south San Francisco and San Bruno, connect with the airport, and continue to Millbrae. The majority of the proposed route is to follow a combination of existing and abandoned railroad rights-of-way. To date, Congress has provided $83,923,000 for the project. The Committees on Appropriations have expressed concern about this project in the past and continue to be concerned about the cost of the project in excess of the ISTEA authorization, the high cost per new trip, the apparently shifting support for the project in some of the communities to be served by the project, and the action of the administration in signing the BART FFGA without having requested sufficient funds in the budget process (or in subsequent budget amendments) to support the FFGA. The Committee has been informed that the San Francisco Board of Supervisors recently authorized a study of the possibility of extending CalTrain from the San Francisco International Airport to Market Street in downtown San Francisco. Proponents of the study indicate that the service would cost a fraction of the BART extension and would arrive in San Francisco 20 minutes faster than a BART train leaving the airport at the same time. The Tasman phase I west extension project consists of 7.6 miles of surface LRT from the northern terminus of the Guadalupe LRT in Santa Clara, west through Sunnyvale, to the CalTrain commuter rail station in Mountain View. The project will include 11 stations and will be double tracked except for partial single tracking between Mountain View and Lockheed station. The west extension is estimated to cost $325,000,000. To date appropriations for the project have totaled $102,750,000. The Committee recommends $34,500,000. Of these funds, $21,400,000 are available only for the San Jose Tasman LRT project and the remaining funds are available for either the San Jose Tasman LRT project or the BART extension to the airport project. The Committee is unwilling at this time to commit additional funds to the BART project without greater budgetary support for the existing stream of FFGA's by the administration, greater certainty that there is not a more efficient and less costly alternative, that the project has overcome the significant local opposition, and that the high cost per new trip cannot be reduced. Boston-South Boston Piers Transitway MOS 2. --The Committee recommends $46,200,000 for the South Boston Piers Transitway project. This project consists of a 1-mile bus tunnel connecting South Station to the World Trade Center and Fan Pier. The tunnel will be used by electric trolleybuses and its construction is timed to coincide with the central artery/tunnel highway project now underway. The project is in the final design stage. The local share commitment to this project is 20 percent. The cost-effectiveness index is $9 per new passenger trip. FTA has determined that the grantee has the financial capacity to build and operate this project. An FFGA was issued in November 1994, in the amount of $330,730,000. The project received an appropriation of $30,000,000 in fiscal year 1997. The FFGA funding schedule provides for $53,990,000 in fiscal year 1998. The administration is requesting $46,200,000 in fiscal year 1998. The remaining $142,320,000,000 would be provided over the course of fiscal years 1999 2001. To date, $112,410,000 has been obligated to the project with only the fiscal year 1997 appropriation remaining unobligated. Boston urban ring .--The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for developing a preferred alternative for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority's planned circumferential corridor located just beyond the Boston central core. Alternatives for this new service include rail service to new station stops on the existing radial system, and enhanced local bus service. Initial cost estimates range from $20,000,000 for the bus alternative to $1,400,000 for the full build alternative. This project has received a total of $1,100,000 in past years' appropriations. Burlington-Essex Junction commuter rail .--The Committee recommends $8,000,000 for the construction of a commuter rail line linking Burlington to Essex Junction. The commuter rail improvements in this corridor include track, tunnel, signal, grade crossing, and drainage improvements. In Burlington, the terminus would be the newly developed Main Street Landing/Union Station site. Hourly commuter rail service would be provided on the New England Central Railway right-of-way. The project includes the construction of stations with park-and-ride lots and integrated feeder bus service. Canton-Akron-Cleveland commuter rail project .--The Committee has included $800,000 for the proposed Canton-Akron-Cleveland commuter rail project. This regional line will relieve traffic congestion on Interstate 77 and help with air quality issues in nonattainment areas. Charleston, SC, monobeam rail project .--The Committee recommends $3,000,000 for the construction of a full-scale demonstration monobeam rail line linking the Charleston International Airport to the Charleston Coliseum/Convention Center. This funding will allow completion of the first phase of the project, covering the 1.2 miles of the distance between the coliseum and the convention center. Cincinnati Northeast/Northern Kentucky Rail Line project .--The corridor extends from the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport through downtown Cincinnati to King's Island Amusement Park in Warren County, OH. This 33-mile corridor paralleling I 71 generally runs in a northeasterly direction, and so is referred to as the Northeast corridor. The capital cost of the rail alternative is $800,000,000. The project is currently in the system planning studies phase. For fiscal year 1998, the Committee has included $500,000. Clark County, NV, RTC fixed guideway .--The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for preliminary engineering and design for a proposed fixed guideway system in the Las Vegas, NV, valley. There are two major components to the proposed fixed guideway system: a 15.6-mile core system running south from Cashman Field to the Stratosphere Tower, then branching out along Sahara Avenue and paralleling Las Vegas Boulevard south behind the valley's resorts. In addition, an extension to McCarran International Airport is planned. The regional transportation commission is currently in the final phase of a major investment study for the Las Vegas corridor. FTA has not rated the project's financial plan. Dallas-DART north central light rail extension project. --The Committee recommends $14,000,000 for the Dallas-DART north central light rail extension project. This project is a 12.5-mile, eight-station, $347,100,000 LRT extension to Plano. The southern 8.5 miles, from Park Lane to Richardson Transit Center, would be double tracked. The northern 4 miles would be single track initially with limited station development. Dallas area rapid transit has completed a major investment study [MIS] and the preferred alternative was selected in September 1994. The project is now in the preliminary engineering phase. A final EIS should be ready for circulation in the spring of 1997. The local share commitment to this project is 50 percent. The cost-effectiveness index is $11 per new passenger trip. FTA has assigned a financial rating of high to this project. Through fiscal year 1997, Congress has appropriated $16,360,000 for this project. Denver Southwest corridor LRT. --The Committee recommends $30,000,000 for the Denver Southwest corridor light rail transit [LRT] project. The total FFGA amount for this 8.7-mile LRT extension is $120,000,000. The extension will connect with the existing Denver central corridor light rail line from the I 25/Broadway interchange, and run over an exclusive, grade-separated right-of-way paralleling Santa Fe Drive, to Mineral Avenue in Littleton. The FFGA funding schedule for this project provides for $25,000,000 in fiscal year 1998 new starts funds. The administration has requested $21,400,000 in fiscal year 1998. Through fiscal year 1997, $2,830,000 has been provided to this project. To date, $1,490,000 has been obligated to the project. This project is currently in the final design stage. The cost-effectiveness index is $3 per new passenger trip. East Side access project, New York .--The Committee has provided $50,000,000 for the East Side access project which will link the Long Island Railroad to Grand Central Station and New York's East Side. The funds provided are for right-of-way acquisition, construction management, project management, and related costs such as value engineering, constructability reviews, and peer review. The 63d Street Tunnel, now used by subway trains, has a lower level built for future use by Long Island Railroad trains, and this link is expected to reduce the need for passengers to backtrack from Penn Station on New York's West Side to their destinations on the East Side. Florida (Miami) Tri-County commuter rail. --The Committee recommends $12,000,000 for the tri-county commuter rail project. The Tri-County Commuter Rail Authority [Tri-Rail] operates a 70-mile commuter rail system connecting Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach Counties. Tri-Rail's short-range program includes the addition of a second track and rehabilitation of the signal system. These improvements will reduce conflicts with Amtrak and CSX freight trains. The project is in the final design stage. Through fiscal year 1997, Congress has appropriated $43,320,000 in section 5309 new starts funds for Tri-Rail improvements. Information concerning the local share commitment to the program, cost-effectiveness index, and financial plan has not been finalized. The estimated total cost of the project is $438,000,000. Galveston rail trolley system .--The Committee recommends $4,000,000 to expand the existing Galveston Island rail trolley system by 3.2 miles, to connect the University of Texas Medical Branch, the island's largest employer, to downtown Galveston. No appropriations have been previously provided for this project. Griffin light rail transit line .--The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for the planned 16-mile light rail transit line from downtown Hartford, CT, to Bradley International Airport. The first 12 miles of the project, which would run over rail right-of-way owned by the State and by Amtrak, as well as an at-grade segment in the city of Hartford, is estimated to cost $250,000,000. The project has previously received a total of $990,000 in Federal funds, toward preliminary engineering and developing an environmental impact statement. Hollis to Ketchikan, AK, ferry project .--The Committee recommends that FTA deobligate the $6,390,000 that was provided to the Hollis-Ketchikan ferry in fiscal year 1997. These funds shall be reprogrammed to the available fiscal year 1998 new fixed guideway systems funds, increasing the total available funding in the Committee's recommendation to $786,390,000. Further funding of the Hollis-Ketchikan ferry project, which includes a new passenger terminal at Hollis and a new 196-foot sheltered-deck ferry vessel, will be included under the Federal Highway Administration's discretionary ferries program in future. Houston Metro regional bus plan. --The Committee recommends $51,100,000 for the Houston Metro regional bus plan. This $625,000,000 plan, developed by Houston Metro, consists of a package of major improvements to the region's existing bus system. It includes major service expansions in most of the region, new and extended HOV (high-occupancy vehicle) facilities and ramps, several transit centers and park-and-ride lots, and supporting facilities. The individual elements of the plan are in various stages of development, from preliminary engineering to construction. The local share commitment to this project is 20 percent. The cost-effectiveness index is $3 per new passenger trip. FTA has determined that the grantee has the financial capacity to build and operate this project. An FFGA was issued for this project on December 30, 1994, which fulfilled the requirements of section 3035(uu) of ISTEA. A total of $40,590,000 was provided to this project in FTA's fiscal year 1997 appropriation. The FFGA funding schedule for this project provides for $59,670,000 in fiscal year 1998 new starts funds. The administration has requested $51,070,000 in fiscal year 1998. The remaining $121,610,000 needed to complete the project shall be provided in fiscal years 1999 2000. Indianapolis northeast corridor .--The Committee recommends $1,500,000 for a major investment study to determine the feasibility of commuter rail service linking downtown Indianapolis with northern suburban areas in Marion and Hamilton Counties. The primary route for this service would use an abandoned rail line linking Noblesville in Hamilton County with Union Station in downtown Indianapolis. Jackson, MS, intermodal corridor project .--The Committee recommends $3,000,000 for preliminary engineering of the Jackson, MS, intermodal corridor. The corridor extends from the Jackson State University campus through downtown Jackson to the Jackson International Airport. The amount of $5,500,000 was appropriated for this project in fiscal year 1997. Los Angeles, MOS 3 project .--The 23-mile, $5,700,000,000 Metro Red Line rail project is planned as minimum operable segments [MOS's] for funding purposes. ISTEA defined MOS 3 to include three Metro Rail extensions including the North Hollywood extension, the East Side extension, and the midcity extension. A full funding grant agreement has been signed, committing $1,416,490,000 in funding. To date, Congress has appropriated $510,227,000 including $70,000,000 in fiscal year 1997. The Committee recommends $51,000,000 for the project. None of the funds provided to the Los Angeles MOS 3 project shall be available until (1) the LACMTA produces an adopted recovery plan and a financially constrained long-range transportation plan, including compliance with the consent decree entered in 1996 for enhanced bus service; (2) the FTA conducts a final review and accepts the plans; (3) the General Accounting Office and the Department of Transportation's inspector general conduct an independent analysis of the plans and provide such analysis to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations; and (4) until after the FTA has reviewed the General Accounting Office and inspector general's analyses and certifies to the Committees on Appropriations that the fiscal management of the project meet or exceed accepted U.S. Government standards. Maryland commuter rail [MARC]. --The Committee recommends $35,000,000 for the MARC commuter rail project. Planned system extensions would provide service to Washington, DC, from both Waldorf and Frederick, MD. FTA has provided planning funds to the Tri-County Council for Southern Maryland for a major investment study [MIS] to evaluate transit alternatives in the Waldorf area. The MIS is expected to be completed in 1997. The extension of MARC service to Frederick consists of a 13.5-mile line which will operate on existing CSX transportation rail right-of-way. The MARC program also includes new equipment and station improvements. The local share commitment to this project is 20 percent. FTA has determined that the grantee has the financial capacity to build and operate the Frederick project and the new equipment and station improvements. An FFGA was issued for the Frederick extension and capital improvement projects in June 1995 for $105,250,000. Through fiscal year 1997, Congress has appropriated $56,740,000 applied to the FFGA for this project (and $33,250,000 not included in the FFGA). The FFGA funding schedule calls for $31,480,000 in new starts funding in fiscal year 1998. The administration's request includes $26,940,000 for this project with $21,580,000 to be provided between fiscal years 1999 and 2000. To date, $57,030,000 has been obligated to the project. Memphis, TN, Main Street trolley extension. --The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for the Memphis Medical Center rail extension project. The Memphis Area Transit Authority [MATA] currently operates the 2.2-mile Main Street trolley, a vintage rail trolley line in downtown Memphis. The Main Street trolley extension via the Riverfront loop is now under construction. This line will serve existing and proposed developments along the Mississippi River and connect with the Main Street trolley, Central Station, and North End terminal. The funds provided for the rail connection to the medical center will complete the downtown rail circulation system. To date, Congress has appropriated $4,750,000 for the Memphis regional rail plan. Nassau hub rail link EIS .--The Committee recommends $500,000 for an environmental impact statement [EIS] for the proposed Nassau hub rail link project. This first stage of the project is expected to cost around $50,000,000. The Committee notes that the Nassau County Legislature has committed financing to the project, approving a $500,000 bond to finance the preparation of surveys and plans for improvements to Memorial Coliseum and for the rail link. The funds provided in this bill would help determine the environment impact the project would have on the Nassau County region. New Jersey urban core. --The Committee recommends $91,000,000 for the New Jersey urban core project, and directs that $27,000,000 shall go toward the Secaucus transfer and $64,000,000 shall go toward the Hudson-Bergen light rail line. The urban core project consists of a number of rail improvements designed to improve mobility in northern New Jersey, and consists of the following segments: Secaucus transfer; Kearney connection; Hudson-Bergen line; Newark Airport-Elizabeth transit link; Northeast corridor signal system; a rail connection between Penn Station, Newark, and Broad Street Station, Newark; and improvements to New York Penn Station. The local financial commitment is accounted for through the ISTEA toll revenue credit provision. ISTEA earmarked $634,400,000 for the entire urban core program of projects. An FFGA was issued for the Secaucus transfer project in December 1994 to provide a total of $444,250,000 through fiscal year 1998, including funds provided in prior years. The Secaucus transfer project consists of a three-level transfer station allowing commuters on the Main line, Bergen County line, Pascack Valley line, and Port Jervis line to transfer to Northeast corridor commuter trains destined to Penn Station in midtown Manhattan or Penn Station in Newark. The project is currently under construction. The Secaucus transfer project received an appropriation of $105,530,000 in fiscal year 1997. The project's FFGA funding schedule calls for $26,990,000 in new starts funding in fiscal year 1998, the amount reflected in the administration request for fiscal year 1998. The FFGA funding schedule for the Hudson-Bergen line includes $64,000,000 in fiscal year 1998. The administration request for fiscal year 1998 is $54,780,000. The Hudson-Bergen project is a 20.5-mile, 33-station at-grade LRT line from the Vince Lombardi park-and-ride lot through Hoboken and Jersey City to Route 440 in southwest Jersey City and 34th street in Bayonne. The 10-mile initial operating segment is in preliminary engineering. The $694,000,000 (total cost) Newark-Elizabeth light rail project, a 9-mile, 15-station light rail transit line linking the cities of Newark and Elizabeth and Newark International Airport, is in preliminary engineering. Through fiscal year 1997, Congress has appropriated a total of $549,930,000 to New Jersey urban core projects. New Orleans Canal Street corridor project .--The Regional Transit Authority [RTA] is developing a 4.4-mile streetcar project in downtown New Orleans. The Canal Street corridor would extend along the median of Canal Street from the Canal Ferry at the Mississippi River in the central business district, through the Mid-City neighborhood, to two outer termini at N. Anthony and Degado Community College/City Park. The capital cost estimate is $92,600,000. The project is currently in the preliminary engineering phase. Through fiscal year 1997, Congress has appropriated $26,382,000. The Committee recommendation includes $8,000,000 for the Canal Street corridor in fiscal year 1998. Northern Indiana commuter rail (South Shore) .--The Northern Indiana Commuter Transportation District [NICTD] operates the South Shore Line passenger service between South Bend, IN, and the Randolph Street Station in Chicago, IL. In order to meet the growing demand for commuter rail service in northern Indiana, the Committee recommends $6,000,000, to be matched with local funds, for the purchase of additional passenger train cars. Oklahoma City, MAPS corridor transit system. --The Committee has provided $2,000,000 for the Oklahoma City metropolitan area projects [MAPS] rail trolley system. The system is estimated to cost about $21,700,000. Project sponsors propose a 60-percent Federal/40-percent local match. Orlando-Lynx light rail project. --The Committee recommends $31,800,000 for the Orlando, FL, Lynx light rail project. The locally preferred alternative, selected in September 1995, includes highway improvements along a 75-mile corridor and a light rail transit [LRT] component along a 52-mile corridor at a capital cost of $2,700,000,000. A 25-mile minimum operating segment of the LRT is in preliminary engineering with a capital cost of $880,000,000. In fiscal year 1997, Congress appropriated $2,000,000 to this project. Pittsburgh Airport busway. --The Committee recommends $8,000,000 for the airport busway project. The Port Authority [PATransit] is constructing a 20-mile busway in the airport corridor between downtown Pittsburgh and the Greater Pittsburgh International Airport. Phase 1 of the project is a 7-mile busway from Carnegie to downtown Pittsburgh. Phase 1 also includes a 1.1-mile HOV facility comprised of a rehabilitated Wabash Tunnel and a new bridge across the Monongahela River. In the remaining 12 miles of the corridor, from Carnegie to the airport, buses will operate in mixed traffic on the relatively uncongested Parkway West [I 279]. Phase 1 was originally estimated to cost $326,800,000. The busway project is presently under construction. The local share commitment to the project is 21 percent. The cost-effectiveness index is $4 per new passenger trip. FTA has determined that the grantee has the financial capacity to build and operate this project. An FFGA was issued for this project in October 1994. The FFGA commits $121,000,000 in section 5309 new start funds. Through fiscal year 1997, Congress appropriated $130,930,000 in new start funds for the project including $22,700,000 in prior-year deobligated funds that were applied to the project in fiscal year 1996. The FFGA funding commitment for this project has now been completed. New starts funds totaling $130,930,000 have been obligated to the project, so no appropriations remain unobligated. The Committee encourages the Administrator to work with the Port Authority of Allegheny County to resolve outstanding issues with the airport busway project submittal. Portland Westside LRT project. --The Committee recommends $63,400,000 for the Portland Westside LRT project. Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation District of Oregon [Tri-Met] is building a $963,520,000 (total funding) light rail transit extension from downtown Portland, west through Beaverton, to a terminus in downtown Hillsboro. In downtown Portland, the 18-mile extension will connect to the existing Banfield LRT line [MAX] that operates between Portland and Gresham. The project is now under construction. The local share commitment to this project is 27 percent. The cost-effectiveness index is $12 per new passenger trip. In September 1992 FTA and Tri-Met entered into a full funding grant agreement [FFGA] for the 12-mile segment from downtown Portland to 185th Avenue. The section 5309 new start share for this segment was $515,990,000. The FFGA was amended in 1994 to add the 6.2-mile Hillsboro extension, bringing the total section 5309 share to $590,060,000. An additional $40,000,000 was added to the project in fiscal year 1996. Through fiscal year 1997, Congress has appropriated $530,280,000 in new start funds. The FFGA funding schedule for the Portland Westside LRT project includes $74,070,000 in fiscal year 1998. The administration request for fiscal year 1998 is $63,390,000. To date, all appropriated funds have been obligated with no prior-year appropriations remaining unobligated. Research Triangle Park regional transit plan. --The Committee recommends $14,000,000 for the Research Triangle Park transit plan in Raleigh-Durham, NC. In fiscal year 1997, Congress appropriated $2,000,000 to this project. Sacramento. --The Committee recommends $20,300,000 for the Sacramento south corridor project. The Sacramento Regional Transit District [RTD] is proposing a 6.3-mile, $220,300,000, LRT line on Union Pacific Railroad right-of-way. This will be phase 1 of a planned 11.3-mile extension in the south Sacramento corridor. The local share commitment to this project is 49 percent. The cost-effectiveness index is $6 per new passenger trip. FTA has rated the capital finance plan for phase 1 as high. The administration has announced plans to negotiate an FFGA with Sacramento to provide a commitment of $113,200,000 in new starts funds for the 6.3-mile extension. Through fiscal year 1997, $9,920,000 has been appropriated for this project. To date, $1,980,000 has been obligated to the project. Roaring Fork Valley rail .--The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for the initial development of the Roaring Fork Valley rail project, located in the corridor extending from Aspen, CO, to Glenwood Springs, CO. This project was created as a result of the major feasibility study and environmental analysis completed on Highway 82 by the Colorado Department of Transportation [CDOT]. State Highway 82 is currently the only transportation corridor between Glenwood Springs and Aspen, and it is the most congested two-lane highway in Colorado. The corridor has been designated as one of the top three priority corridors for passenger rail service by CDOT. Salt Lake City LRT. --The Committee recommends $84,000,000 for the Salt Lake City south LRT project. Utah Transit Authority [UTA] plans to construct a 15-mile light rail transit [LRT] line from downtown Salt Lake City to suburban areas to the south. The LRT line would operate at-grade on city streets in the downtown and utilize a railroad right-of-way already owned by UTA to the south of downtown. The ground-breaking ceremony for this project was held in April 1997. The local share commitment to this project is 23 percent. The cost-effectiveness index is $4 per new passenger trip. FTA has negotiated an FFGA with UTA committing $237,400,000 in new starts funds to the project. Total cost of the project is $312,500,000. Through fiscal year 1997, a total of $73,390,000 has been appropriated by Congress to this project, of which $66,790,000 applies toward the FFGA. The Committee notes that the designation of Salt Lake City as host of the Winter Olympics in 2002 makes urgent the completion of this project. The Committee anticipates that the funds provided will be fully obligated in fiscal year 1998. Salt Lake City regional commuter system .--The Committee recommends $8,000,000 to be used for both implementation of an interim commuter rail service from Provo to Salt Lake to mitigate the impacts to traffic of the I 15 construction and for planning for a comprehensive system serving the corridor from Brigham City on the north to Payson on the south. The implementation costs include station construction, equipment transport, insurance, staff training, and maintenance facility and parts establishment, as well as operating assistance. The planning funds will be used to develop an implementation plan for fully implementing commuter rail in the entire study corridor. This project is an integral part of the strategy to meet the transportation needs of the area as host of the 2002 Winter Olympics. Seattle-Renton-Tacoma light rail project. --The Committee recommends $24,000,000 for the Seattle-Renton-Tacoma light rail project. The three county Central Puget Sound Regional Transit Authority [RTA] Board has adopted a 10-year regional plan. The plan, scaled down from a 1995 proposal, is valued at $3,900,000,000 in proposed transportation improvements, and includes substantial commuter rail service in the region (principally between Seattle and Tacoma) as well as LRT and expanded bus service. A major investment study is currently underway. An appropriation of $2,980,000 was made to the project in fiscal year 1997. Springfield-Branson, MO, commuter rail line .--The Committee recommends $500,000 for the development of the Springfield-Branson commuter rail line. St. Louis Metrolink (St. Clair County, IL) corridor .--The Committee recommends $30,000,000 for the St. Clair County corridor LRT. The FFGA funding schedule for this St. Louis Metrolink project calls for $35,000,000 in fiscal year 1998. The administration request for fiscal year 1998 is $29,960,000. The East-West Gateway Coordinating Council [EWGCC] has completed a major investment study of transit alternatives for the corridor between downtown East St. Louis, IL, and the Mid-America Airport in St. Clair County. The selected alternative is a 27-mile LRT extension with a total cost of $431,500,000. The FFGA new starts amount for the initial 17 miles of this alternative is $243,930,000. The local share commitment to this project is 28 percent, and a medium/high rating for financial capacity has been assigned by FTA. The cost-effectiveness index is $23 per new passenger trip for the full 27-mile project. Through fiscal year 1997, $48,190,000 has been allocated to this project. Congress appropriated $32,000,000 to this project in fiscal year 1997. To date, $48,190,000 has been obligated and no money remains unobligated. Charlotte transitway .--The Committee is encouraged by efforts of the city of Charlotte, NC, to construct a transitway system, utilizing abandoned railroad tracks that spoke from the suburbs into the center of the city. MASS TRANSIT CAPITAL FUND (Liquidation of Contract Authorization) (Highway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1997 ($2,300,000,000) Budget estimate, 1998 (2,350,000,000) Committee recommendation (2,350,000,000) The bill includes $2,350,000,000 to liquidate obligations incurred under contract authority provided in section 21 of the Urban Mass Transportation Act of 1964, as amended. WASHINGTON METROPOLITAN AREA TRANSIT AUTHORITY [WMATA] Appropriations, 1997 $200,000,000 Budget estimate, 1998 (highway trust fund) 200,000,000 Committee recommendation 160,000,000 Public Law 96 184 (Stark-Harris legislation) enacted January 3, 1980, authorized a total of $1,700,000,000 for construction on the Washington Metrorail System. In addition, the National Capital Transportation Amendments of 1990, Public Law 101 551, authorized another $1,300,000,000 in Federal capital assistance. Through fiscal year 1997, $1,049,700,000 has been appropriated, leaving a balance of $250,300,000. ST. LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION The St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation (the Corporation) is a wholly owned Government corporation established by the St. Lawrence Seaway Act of May 14, 1954. The Corporation is responsible for the operation, maintenance, and development of the United States portion of the St. Lawrence Seaway between Montreal and Lake Erie. The Corporation's major priorities are to control Corporation costs and encourage increased use of the Seaway system. OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE (Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1997\1\ $10,337,00006 Budget estimate, 1998\2\ (mandatory) ........................... Committee recommendation\2\ (mandatory) ........................... \1\Does not include reductions for TASC and awards pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. \2\Assumes enactment of authorizing legislation to provide mandatory payment. Performance-based organization [PBO] initiative The administration for 1998 has proposed that Government agencies restructure themselves as performance-based organizations [PBO's]. The St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation [SLSDC] is one of the nine candidate agencies. (The others are Department of Commerce seafood inspection; Patent and Trademark Office; National Technical Information Service; Defense Commissary Agency; Federal Housing Administration mortgage insurance services; Government National Mortgage Association; the U.S. Mint; and Federal retirement benefit service.) Each candidate agency is coordinating with the ``National Performance Review,'' Office of Management and Budget, and Office of Personnel Management to develop authorizing legislation that is customized to meet its unique needs. It is the Committee's understanding that as a PBO, the Corporation would remain part of the Department of Transportation, but would be freed of certain departmental constraints. For instance, as a PBO the Corporation would be allowed to streamline its organization, personnel, and procurement rules; would have authority to conduct routine negotiations directly with the Canadian Seaway Authority regarding seaway operations; would be free to set its own policies and directives as they relate to operations; and would no longer be required to contribute to certain expenses shared by departmental operating expenses, such as the Transportation Administrative Service Center and reimbursable agreement costs. The administration did not request appropriated funds for the Corporation, as financing is proposed to be derived from an automatic annual payment from the harbor maintenance trust fund [HMTF], based on 5-year average tonnage through the Seaway. The PBO proposal includes an automatic annual payment for fiscal year 1998 estimated at $11,200,000 from the HMTF, and $1,220,000 from non-Federal source revenue collections and the Corporation's financial reserve, for a total budget program level of $12,420,000 ($11,680,000 to fund operations and maintenance and $740,000 for capital improvements). Authorizing legislation is necessary to establish the Corporation as a PBO and provide the financing mechanism that disburses this annual automatic payment. The administration has asserted that, while this funding will be derived from a new mandatory account, it will not require an amendment to the Budget Enforcement Act. In a May 1997 General Accounting Office report directed in the 1997 appropriations conference report (H. Rept. 104 785), the GAO found the effects of PBO status on the Corporation to be mixed. The GAO reported that the proposal appears to be a workable mechanism for addressing the administration's desires for more predictable funding, an incentive-based focus on performance standards and measures, and relief from DOT reporting requirements. However, other approaches are available to address some of the Corporation's stated needs (such as DOT granting waivers from reporting requirements), and the Committee has determined--using actual historical tonnage figures--that the Corporation's funding stream expressed in constant dollars has actually been higher since fiscal year 1993 than it would have been under the PBO formula. COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION The Committee bears no prejudice against the administration's performance-based organization concept, and is willing to allow the authorization process more time before making a final decision regarding fiscal year 1998 funding for the Corporation. Therefore, no appropriated funds or bill language are included. In questions for the record submitted to the St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation, the Committee asked: If the authorizing committees fail to enact PBO legislation before the Senate passes its version of the fiscal year 1998 Transportation appropriations bill, will the administration submit a budget amendment requesting an appropriation of $11,200,000 from the harbor maintenance trust fund? If not, and appropriations legislation goes to conference and is passed without including appropriated funds for the Corporation, how will the agency make up the funding shortfall? The Corporation's answer was: If the PBO legislation is not enacted, we believe the administration will submit a budget amendment; however, we do not have formal confirmation of such action. If not, the Corporation would have no choice but to rely on its available emergency reserves. The Committee hopes that, failing timely authorization, the administration will step in with a budget amendment requesting appropriated funds for the Corporation; and if presented with such a request, the Committee would give it every due consideration. RESEARCH AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS ADMINISTRATION The Research and Special Programs Administration [RSPA] was established by the Secretary of Transportation's organizational changes dated July 20, 1977, and serves as a research, analytical, and technical development arm of the Department for multimodal research and development, as well as special programs. Particular emphasis is given to pipeline transportation and the transportation of hazardous cargo by all modes. In 1998, resources are requested for the management and execution of the Offices of Hazardous Materials Safety, Emergency Transportation, Pipeline Safety, program and administrative support. Funds are also requested for the emergency preparedness grants program. RSPA's two reimbursable programs--Transportation Safety Institute [TSI] and the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center [VNTSC]--support research safety and security programs for all modes of transportation. RESEARCH AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS Appropriations, 1997\1\ $29,886,000 Budget estimate, 1998 30,102,000 Committee recommendation 28,450,000 \1\Does not reflect reduction of $183,000 for TASC and awards pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. The Committee has provided a total of $28,450,000 for the ``Research and special programs'' account, which is $1,652,000 below the administration's request. The following table summarizes the Committee recommendations: Fiscal year 1997 enacted\1\ Fiscal year 1998 estimate Committee recommendation Hazardous materials safety $15,268,000 $15,492,000 $15,492,000 Emergency transportation $993,000 $993,000 $1,443,000 Research and technology $6,580,000 $5,296,000 $3,296,000 Program and administrative support $6,862,000 $8,321,000 $8,219,000 ----------------------------- --------------------------- -------------------------- Total, research and special programs $29,703,000 $30,102,000 $28,450,000 (Positions) (197) (197) (195) \1\Includes $183,000 reduction for TASC and awards pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY The Office of Hazardous Materials Safety [HMS] administers a nationwide program of safety regulations to fulfill the Secretary's duty to protect the Nation from the risks to life, health, and property that are inherent in the transportation of hazardous materials by water, air, highway, and railroad. HMS plans, implements, and manages the hazardous materials transportation program consisting of information systems, research and analysis, inspection and enforcement, rulemaking support, training and information dissemination, and emergency procedures. The Committee recommends $15,492,000 for hazardous materials safety, which is the amount requested by the administration. The Committee, for the Office of Hazardous Materials Safety, recommends $9,025,000, the amount requested in the budget. The Office of Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety has continued its longstanding practice of failing to maintain its personnel resources at the enacted levels. For example, as of June 30, 1997, there were at least 16 positions that were not filled. The Committee directs the RSPA personnel office and the RSPA Administrator to explore alternative means to comply fully with the staffing level that was approved by the conferees in the fiscal year 1997 legislative cycle. The Administrator shall prepare a letter to be submitted to both the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations before January 1, 1998, on the steps that will be taken to address this problem. Emergency transportation Emergency transportation [ET] programs provide support to the Secretary of Transportation for his statutory and administrative responsibilities in the area of transportation civil emergency preparedness and response. This program develops and coordinates the Department's policies, plans, and programs, in headquarters and the field to provide for emergency preparedness. ET is responsible for implementing the Transportation Department's National Security Program initiatives, including an assessment of the transportation implications of the changing global threat. The Office is also charged with the development of crisis management plans to mitigate disasters and the implementation of these plans nationally and regionally in an emergency. The Committee recommends $1,443,000 for emergency transportation, an increase of $450,000 above the amount requested by the administration. Crisis response management. --The Office of Emergency Transportation coordinates civil emergency preparedness and response for transportation services during national and regional emergencies, across the entire continuum of crises, including natural catastrophes such as earthquakes and hurricanes, and international and domestic terrorism. However, very little transportation-oriented civil emergency preparedness work has been done in relation to tornadoes, which are a deadly threat to the Southern and Midwestern States most prone to these storms. The Committee has provided $450,000 for a transportation emergency preparedness and response demonstration project, of which $400,000 shall be used to assist in the construction and establishment of an underground emergency transportation management center utilizing satellite communications. The remaining $50,000 shall be used to evaluate and report on the demonstration in order to provide other communities with information to improve and enhance emergency preparedness and response capabilities, and to cover administrative and other expenses, such as travel, that may be incurred by the Department of Transportation in carrying out this demonstration. The center shall be located, in a region that is susceptible to tornadoes and at an elevation of over 1,300 feet above sea level for improved radio and microwave signal transmission capability; and be within reasonably close proximity to military, space and/or nuclear facilities to provide rapid response time (but far enough away to be safe from disaster impacts). After an appropriate site is determined, the Department of Transportation shall coordinate with the State emergency management agency to construct and establish emergency management services. The Committee does not intend for the Department of Transportation to provide ongoing consulting or other services for the center. Research and technology The Committee supports a modest departmental effort to create a strategic planning process that: (1) provides a framework for Federal transportation research and development based on national needs; (2) specifies Federal transportation research and development priorities; (3) identifies opportunities for collaboration among Federal agencies, DOT operating administrations, and other research performers in academia and the private sector; and (4) assesses, over time, the impact of transportation research and development investments on the Nation's transportation system. The Committee also supports a limited research and development program aimed at addressing cross-cutting areas of concern that pertain to the missions of more than one of the Department's modal administrations. To further these objectives, the Committee recommends $1,900,000 for research and technology, a reduction of $2,000,000 below the requested contract program level. As requested, $350,000 has been provided for strategic research and development programs, which will assist the Departmentwide efforts in biomechanics, human factors, and other cross-cutting research efforts. The Committee denies funds for university programs because the administrative takedown provided under the contract authority program is sufficient to meet this need. The Committee also limits the amount of funds that may be provided for international technology systems assessment or scanning to $100,000, because of possible overlap with other scanning activities conducted by the FHWA. The Committee directs that the Deputy Secretary and the RSPA Administrator institute the appropriate mechanisms to ensure that the Department's research and development management and strategic planning process is broadened to include more input from the States, the private sector, and the public in general. Appropriate meetings of the various research coordinating committees and council should be open to the public with opportunities for comment. Departmentwide plans and strategies need to be more closely linked to, and depend more heavily on, similar plans and strategies of the modal administrations, and there needs to be evidence of a clear integration of DOT's research and development program with those of other Departments. The Committee is also concerned that almost all of the funds provided for research and technology are being allocated to the Volpe Center or to the Transportation Research Board. Potential contributions from other resources should be explored. In view of the uncertainty this year regarding the possible authorization of contract funds that could duplicate some of the moneys recommended herein, the Committee directs the Department to obtain the approval of both the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations before obligating any of these appropriated funds. Simultaneous vehicle and infrastructure design [SVID] .--The Committee directs the RSPA Administrator to submit a letter to the Committees on Appropriations by January 30, 1998, on the concept of simultaneous vehicle and infrastructure design. The Department of Energy national laboratories have proposed a systems engineering concept in which various components of transportation infrastructure and users are viewed as an overall system, and transportation infrastructure, vehicles, and other systems are designed and developed in this integrated environment. Automobile manufacturers, State and Federal highway departments, transportation construction representatives, universities, and the national labs would create a common test facility to review new vehicle designs, infrastructure developments, and user habits. The Committee encourages coordinated research activities, and looks forward to RSPA's review of the SVID concept. Program and administrative support The program support function provides legal, financial, management, and administrative support to the operating offices within RSPA. These support activities include executive direction (Office of the Administrator), program and policy support, civil rights and special programs, legal services and support, and management and administration. The Committee has provided $8,219,000, a reduction of $102,000 below the requested level, and has made a reduction of two associated positions in the Office of Policy and Program Support. RSPA shall not transfer on a temporary or permanent detail personnel from other offices to the Office of Policy and Program Support. Administration of the university transportation centers programs .--The Committee encourages RSPA to give favorable consideration to requests for university transportation centers grants from the National Center for Advanced Transportation Technology [NCATT], at the University of Idaho. The NCATT is a multidisciplinary research center that allows University of Idaho faculty, students, and engineers work together to identify, develop, and test technologies that will reduce the dependency on fossil fuels for transportation systems. The NCATT focuses its research on vehicle technology, including biodiesel fuels, hybrid electric vehicles and battery technology, turbine motor technology, and vehicle frame materials and manufacturing. In addition, the center performs research involving traffic systems technology, including video-based traffic monitoring, traffic control, and transportation system design and operation. The Committee encourages the Department to consider including the University of Alabama among the institutions participating in this program. PIPELINE SAFETY (Pipeline Safety Fund) Appropriations, 1997\1\ $28,460,000 Budget estimate, 1998 30,660,000 Committee recommendation \2\30,000,000 \1\Does not reflect reduction of $102,042 for TASC and awards pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. \2\An additional $2,000,000 from pipeline user fees collected in previous years is included in this total. The Research and Special Programs Administration is also responsible for the Department's Pipeline Safety Program. This activity is entirely financed by user fees assessed to the pipeline operators and by fees paid to the oilspill liability trust fund [OSLTF]. The Pipeline Safety Program promotes the safe, reliable, and environmentally sound transportation of natural gas and hazardous liquids by pipeline. This national program regulates the design, construction, operation, maintenance, and emergency response procedures pertaining to gas and hazardous liquids pipeline systems and liquefied natural gas facilities. Also included is research and development to support the Pipeline Safety Program and grants-in-aid to State agencies that conduct a Pipeline Safety Program. The following table summarizes the Committee recommendations: [In thousands of dollars] Program Fiscal year-- Committee recommendation 1997 enacted 1998 estimate Operating expenses 10,300 11,800 11,480 Information systems 1,200 1,200 1,200 Risk assessment/technical studies 1,800 1,200 1,200 Compliance 300 300 300 Training and information dissemination 860 821 820 Emergency notification 100 100 100 Public education 200 200 400 Environmental indexing Research and development 1,500 1,339 1,300 State grants 12,000 13,500 13,000 Risk management grants 200 200 200 One-call grants \1\(1,000) \1\(1,000) \1\(1,500) -------------- --------------- ------------ Totals 28,460 30,660 30,000 \1\Funded from uncommitted balances in the reserve fund. In 1998, the Committee recommendation includes an additional $500,000 in OPS contract program costs also derived from these balances. Operating expenses .--The Committee recommends $11,480,000 for Office of Pipeline Safety [OPS] operating expenses, a reduction of $320,000 below the administration request. The Committee suggests that this reduction be taken from travel and transportation costs and permanent change of station costs. One-call systems public education .--The Committee recommends $400,000 for public education, technical assistance, and outreach regarding one-call systems. Third-party damage continues to be the major single cause of releases from pipelines. The Committee directs the RSPA Administrator to increase the priority that the OPS assigns to underground damage prevention and effective one-call public outreach efforts, and to review carefully each of the NTSB recommendations and results of the NTSB public meeting on one-call systems. The OPS and its damage prevention quality team needs to accelerate its efforts to assist States in advancing one-call systems, and should expand the scope of its efforts toward a more systematic approach to the one-call challenge. Working cooperatively with the States, industry, and various public agencies, OPS is directed to explore ways to increase the participation of operators of underground facilities as members of notification systems. OPS should also redouble its efforts to work with excavators who should call to have lines located before commencing digging. OPS should implement plans with other appropriate parties to improve communication technologies and linking for one-call systems, to outreach to the law enforcement and judicial community, to identify best practices and highlight and analyze successful State programs, and to help develop model programs, and to provide other technical assistance and guidance to the States to improve their underground damage prevention programs. Before April 1, 1998, the RSPA Administrator shall submit a detailed report specifying the progress made in response to these directives and detailing a 5-year strategic plan to help guide further progress. Pipeline grant program .--The Committee recommends $13,000,000 for the natural gas and hazardous liquid pipeline safety grants. One-call grants to States .--The Committee recommends that $1,500,000 be made available for grants to States and other entities for the development and establishment of one-call notification systems. The Committee notes that each year the States request significantly increased amounts of funding that exceed the amounts that have previously been made available. The Committee maintains that these funds will be of critical importance to helping the States make many improvements in one-call systems that they have judged to be of critical importance. Pipeline safety reserve fund .--The Committee's bill includes language to draw down $1,500,000 of the reserve in the pipeline trust fund to support one-call notification systems grants, and an additional $500,000 from the reserve fund to support general pipeline safety programs. RSPA has documented that there is currently a balance of over $19,000,000 in the reserve fund, and has informed the Committee that they believe a fund balance of $11,000,000 would be sufficient to maintain the integrity of the pipeline safety program. Utilizing these excess reserve funds will enable the fiscal year 1998 user fee collections from the gas and liquid pipeline transmission industry to remain within the $28,000,000 limit set in the Public Law 104 304, the Accountable Pipline Safety and Partnership Act of 1996. Research and development .--The Committee directs the RSPA Administrator to provide the Committees on Appropriations, by November 30, 1997, a letter detailing the current and potential use of hydraulic and pneumatic capsule pipeline transportation systems, with a particular emphasis on coal log pipeline technology. Coal log pipelines use only one-third of the water used for coal slurry pipelines, and show promise of cleaner, more efficient transport of coal. RSPA shall confer with the Capsule Pipeline Research Center, which is jointly sponsored by the National Science Foundation, Missouri Department of Economic Development, and 14 private companies, in preparing this status report for the Committees. PIPELINE SAFETY (Oilspill Liability Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1997 $2,528,000 Budget estimate, 1998 2,328,000 Committee recommendation 3,000,000 The Committee recommends $3,000,000 to be derived from the oilspill liability trust fund for implementation of the Office of Pipeline Safety [OPS] responsibilities under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 [OPA]. RSPA has provided the Committee documentation of increased environmental program costs, including data analysis, compliance and spill monitoring, pipeline mapping, environmental indexing, and the State grants for hazardous liquids program. In fiscal year 1998, the total expenses associated with these efforts will exceed the level of OPA trust funds requested by the administration. The Committee finds it reasonable to increase the level of funding derived from the oilspill liability trust fund to support these activities. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS GRANTS (Emergency Preparedness Fund) Appropriations, 1997 $200,000 Budget estimate, 1998 200,000 Committee recommendation 200,000 The Committee recommends $200,000 for the training curriculum activities authorized under existing law. The Hazardous Materials Transportation Uniform Safety Act of 1990 [HMTUSA] requires RSPA to: (1) develop and implement a reimbursable emergency preparedness grants program; (2) monitor public sector emergency response training and planning and provide technical assistance to States, political subdivisions, and Indian tribes; and (3) develop and update periodically a national training curriculum for emergency responders. These activities are financed by receipts received from the hazardous materials shipper and carrier registration fees, which are placed in the emergency preparedness fund. RSPA estimates that receipts in fiscal year 1998 will be essentially the same as the actual fiscal year 1996 receipts, which were $6,900,000. The HMTUSA provides permanent appropriations for the emergency preparedness fund for planning and training grants, monitoring and technical assistance, and for administrative expenses. Appropriations, also from the emergency preparedness fund, provide for the training curriculum for emergency responders. The following table is for illustrative purposes only, based on RSPA's estimates for fiscal year 1998 activity. Fiscal year 1997 enacted Fiscal year 1998 budget estimate\1\ Committee recommendation\1\ Grants $5,810,000 $6,110,000 $6,110,000 Technical assistance 300,000 300,000 300,000 Administrative costs 300,000 300,000 300,000 Emergency response guidebook 300,000 Training curriculum 200,000 200,000 200,000 -------------------------- ------------------------------------- ----------------------------- Total 6,910,000 6,910,000 6,910,000 \1\Estimated levels. OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL SALARIES AND EXPENSES Appropriations, 1997\1\ $37,900,000 Budget estimate, 1998 40,889,000 Committee recommendation 38,900,000 \1\Does not include reductions for TASC and awards pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. The Inspector General Act of 1978 established the Office of Inspector General [OIG] as an independent and objective organization, with a mission to: (1) conduct and supervise audits and investigations relating to the programs and operations of the Department; (2) provide leadership and recommend policies designed to promote economy, efficiency, and effectiveness in the administration of programs and operations; (3) prevent and detect fraud, waste, and abuse; and (4) keep the Secretary and Congress currently informed regarding problems and deficiencies. OIG is divided into three major functional units: Office of Assistant Inspector General for Auditing, Office of Assistant Inspector General for Evaluations, and Office of Assistant Inspector General for Investigations. The assistant inspectors general for auditing and investigations are supported by headquarters and regional staff. The Committee recommends $38,900,000, which is $1,989,000 below the administration's request. The recommended level includes funding for the inspector general to conduct two studies. First, the inspector general is directed to conduct a study of the Transportation Administrative Service Center [TASC] and report to the Committee by April 1, 1998, on the cost effectiveness of TASC for the modal agencies and whether the entrepreneurial, self-sufficient, and competitive business service approach is meeting its customers' and the Department's needs. Second, the Committee directs that, not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this act, the inspector general shall conduct an investigation and submit a report to the Subcommittee on Transportation and Related Agencies of the Committee on Appropriations on the procurement of computers and related equipment and materials for the advanced automation system for air traffic control. The report shall include the following items: (1) a detailed examination of the contracts of each contractor and subcontractor relating to the procurement of computers and related equipment and materials for the advanced automation system for air traffic control; and (2) a detailed accounting of the costs (including losses and waste) to the United States as a result of each contract. This report should be transmitted to the Secretary and the Secretary is directed to provide the Committee on Appropriations a written determination of whether or not any such contractor or subcontractor is potentially liable to the United States under any theory of liability with respect to such a contract; and, if the Secretary makes a determination of potential liability, the identity of the contractor or subcontractor, the basis of liability and the potential amount of liability. BUREAU OF TRANSPORTATION STATISTICS Appropriations, 1997 ........................... ($25,000,000) Budget estimate, 1998 ........................... (31,000,000) Committee recommendation ........................... (By transfer, highway trust fund) (25,000,000) \1\Does not include reductions for TASC and awards pursuant to sections 321 and 346 of Public Law 104 205. The Bureau of Transportation Statistics [BTS] was established in section 6006 of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act [ISTEA], to compile, analyze, and make accessible information on the Nation's transportation systems, collect information on intermodal transportation, and enhance the quality and effectiveness of the statistical programs of the Department of Transportation. Financing of BTS operations is authorized as contract authority out of the highway trust fund, by transfer from the Federal-aid highways program, and is subject to the obligations limitation on that program. For fiscal year 1998, a funding level of $31,000,000 is proposed for BTS programs in the administration's NEXTEA reauthorization proposal. The Committee recommends a transfer of $25,000,000 from Federal Highway Administration highway trust funds, for continued BTS program activities at the fiscal year 1997 enacted level. BTS offices include the Director, Statistical Programs and Services, Transportation Studies, and the Office of Aviation Information [OAI]. In addition, effective January 1, 1996, the responsibility to collect motor carrier financial data was transferred to the BTS after the sunset of the Interstate Commerce Commission. The Office of Aviation Information collects and compiles financial and traffic (passenger and cargo) data. This information provides the Government with uniform and comprehensive economic and market data on individual airline operations. This program includes a small field office located in Anchorage, AK, which provides consumers and the Government with airline data related to essential air service and the intra-Alaskan mail rate program. The statistical aviation data compiled by OAI includes: airline passenger traffic statistics, ontime performance data by carrier, financial performance and certification data, fuel purchase and consumption, and other business and consumer directed statistics. These statistics are vitally important to the Federal Government and the aviation industry. In some cases, it is statutorily required that these statistics be used by the Federal Aviation Administration and the Office of the Secretary of Transportation in allocation of trust funds, aviation bilateral negotiations, and other Federal transportation policy decisionmaking. Earlier in this report, the Office of the Secretary is directed to tender BTS $300,000 in the first quarter of 1998 in reimbursement for OAI statistical support. Reauthorization issues .--The Committee encourages the BTS Director to identify potential fiscal year 1998 carryover funds, in order to ensure continued Bureau operations in the event that there is no enacted ISTEA reauthorization before the new fiscal year begins. SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD SALARIES AND EXPENSES Appropriation Offsetting collections Appropriations, 1997 \1\$12,344,000 $3,000,000 Budget estimate, 1998 14,300,000 Committee recommendation 12,300,000 3,100,000 \1\Excludes reduction of $100,000 pursuant to section 346 of Public Law 104 205. The Surface Transportation Board was created on January 1, 1996, by Public Law 104 88, the ICC Termination Act of 1995. Consistent with the continued trend toward less regulation of the surface transportation industry, the act abolished the ICC, eliminated certain functions that had previously been implemented by the ICC, transferred core rail and certain other functions to the Board, and transferred motor licensing and certain other motor functions to the FHWA. The Board is specifically responsible for the regulation of the rail and pipeline industries and certain nonlicensing regulation of motor carriers and water carriers. Moreover, the Board, through its exemption authority, is able to promote deregulation administratively on a case-by-case basis. Rail reforms made by the Staggers Rail Act of 1980 also have been continued. The administration's fiscal year 1998 program request is $14,300,000 to perform key functions under the ICCTA, including rail rate reasonableness oversight; the processing of rail consolidations, abandonments, and other restructuring proposals; and the resolution of motor carrier undercharge matters. Under the administration's proposal this amount would be derived solely from user fees collected pursuant to 31 U.S.C. 9701 from the beneficiaries of the Board's activities. However, the Committee is convinced that fully fee financing the ICC successor is not a viable option for fiscal year 1998. Such a proposal would require enactment of legislation and promulgation of new rules that are unlikely to be in place in time to ensure undisrupted funding for the Board. A possible legislative vehicle for such a user fee-based structure would be the reauthorization legislation which the authorizing committees plan to take up in the second session of the 105th Congress. The Committee has provided $12,300,000 for activities of the Board, including statutory liability for severance payments. This amount will be augmented by the collection of user fees as provided under current law. The Board has informed the Committee that it anticipates collecting up to $3,100,000 from these funds. Bill language has been included to assure that fees received in excess of $3,100,000 shall remain available to the Board but shall not be available for obligation until October 1, 1998. TITLE II--RELATED AGENCIES ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD SALARIES AND EXPENSES Appropriations, 1997 $3,540,000 Budget estimate, 1998 3,640,000 Committee recommendation 3,640,000 The Committee recommends $3,640,000 for the operations of the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, the same funding level requested by the administration. The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (the Access Board) is the lead Federal Agency promoting accessibility for all handicapped persons. The Access Board was reauthorized in the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1992, Public Law 102 569. Under this authorization, the Access Board's functions are to ensure compliance with the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, and to develop guidelines for and technical assistance to individuals and entities with rights or duties under titles II and III of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The Access Board establishes minimum accessibility guidelines and requirements for public accommodations and commercial facilities, transit facilities and vehicles, State and local government facilities, children's environments, and recreational facilities. The Access Board also provides technical assistance to Government agencies, public and private organizations, individuals, and businesses on the removal of accessibility barriers. NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD SALARIES AND EXPENSES Appropriations, 1997\1\ $42,407,000 Budget estimate, 1998\2\ 40,000,000 Committee recommendation 49,700,000 \1\Excludes $6,000,000 in emergency appropriations. \2\The President's budget request also included an appropriation of $6,000,000 in user fees. The Independent Safety Board Act of 1974 established the National Transportation Safety Board [NTSB] as an independent Federal agency to promote transportation safety by conducting independent accident investigations. In addition, the act authorizes the Board to make safety recommendations, conduct safety studies, and oversee safety activities of other Government agencies involved in transportation. The Board also reviews appeals of adverse actions by the Department of Transportation with respect to airmen and seamen certificates and licenses. The Board has no regulatory authority over the transportation industry. Thus, its effectiveness depends on its reputation for impartial and accurate accident reports, realistic and feasible safety recommendations, and on public confidence in its commitment to improving transportation safety. The bill includes an appropriation of $49,700,000, which is $9,700,000 above the administration's budget request. The following table incorporates the NTSB's internal realignment of administrative functions and provides for salaries and expenses to be distributed as follows: Staff (FTE) Budget authority Policy and direction 59 $7,762,000 Aviation safety 139 16,957,000 Surface transportation safety 107 13,234,000 Research and engineering 65 7,594,000 Administration 29 2,796,000 Administrative law judges 10 1,357,000 ------------- ------------------ Staff hiring .--The Committee notes that many of the Board's reports and safety recommendations have been unnecessarily delayed due to a shortage of investigative and technical staff and due to an increase in the number and complexity of major accidents. This delay has serious implications for the safety of the traveling public. The Committee also recognizes that the necessary increase in the Board's participation in foreign accidents, which has safety implications for American citizens, places additional demands on the technical and investigative staff and contributes to the delay in issuing safety recommendations. Finally, the Committee notes that according to projections prepared by Boeing, the Federal Aviation Administration, and the International Civil Aviation Organization, international civil aviation will continue to grow at about 6 percent per year over the next decade. As a result of these projections, if the current airline accident rates for hull losses and fatal accidents are maintained, the total numbers of major accidents will increase, so that by the year 2006, one major aviation accident will occur each week somewhere in the world. In order to address this situation and to help expedite the safety recommendations made by the Board, the Committee has included an additional $3,229,000 and 25 additional FTE positions, over the fiscal 1997 level, for investigative and technical staff. The Committee urges the Board to hire these additional staff as quickly as possible. The Committee has also provided an additional $782,000 (seven FTE's) for the 24-hour communication center, and an additional $733,000 (seven FTE's) for the family assistance program. User fees .--The Committee has denied the request to collect $6,000,000 in user fees. This request was based on the assumption that legislation authorizing a commercial aviation accident investigation fee would be enacted, and upon enactment, the fee would become available for expenditure. The Committee does not have the jurisdiction to authorize the collection of this fee and is opposed to such a fee because it makes certain transportation sectors (that is, the aviation industry) responsible for paying accident investigation costs while other sectors (that is, rail, highway, marine, et cetera) would not be responsible for these costs. In addition, such fees do not appear to meet existing definitions of user fees, and might upon further analysis, be defined as new taxes. EMERGENCY FUND Appropriations, 1997\1\ $1,000,000 Budget estimate, 1998 1,000,000 Committee recommendation 1,000,000 \1\Contained in the Omnibus Consolidated Appropriations Act of 1997 as an emergency appropriation. The bill includes an appropriation of $1,000,000 for the emergency fund to remain available until expended. Under Public Law 97 257 (Supplemental Appropriations Act, 1982), Congress provided a $1,000,000 emergency fund to be used for accident investigation expenses when investigations would otherwise have been hampered by lack of funding. The Committee notes that the Board has had to use the fund three times in the last 2 years. The Committee's recommendation doubles the size of the emergency fund to $2,000,000. At this level, sufficient funds should be available for unanticipated or unusually expensive accident investigations. TITLE III--GENERAL PROVISIONS The Committee concurs with the general provisions that apply to the Department of Transportation and related agencies as proposed in the budget, with some changes, deletions, and additions. These are noted below: Sec. 305. Includes a provision that prohibits political and Presidential personnel to be assigned on temporary detail outside the Department of Transportation. Sec. 310. This provision is continued with modifications. The Committee does not delete 310(c)(3) as requested by the administration regarding administrative takedown nor include the administration's suggested language; nor does the Committee delete section 310(e) regarding first quarter obligations. Sec. 315. Prohibits the use of funds to award multiyear contracts for production end items that include certain specified provisions. Sec. 316. Allows funds provided under the Federal Transit Administration's Formula Grant Program to be used for purposes consistent with the administration's request for fiscal year 1998. Sec. 317. Allows funds for discretionary grants of the Federal Transit Administration for specific projects, except for fixed guideway modernization projects, not obligated by September 30, 2000, to be used for other projects under 49 U.S.C. 5309. Sec. 322. Prohibits the use of funds in this act for activities designed to influence Congress on legislation or appropriations except through proper, official channels. Sec. 323. Limits the amount available for advisory committees to $1,000,000. Sec. 325. Provides that no funds other than appropriations or collected fees shall be available for conducting Surface Transportation Board activities. Sec. 326. Includes provision relating to compliance with the Buy American Act. Sec. 328. Directs FAA to provide weather observers at Dutch Harbor, AK. Sec. 332. Includes language clarifying the definition of ``passenger capacity of 56 persons or less,'' under section 29(a)(2) of the International Air Transportation Competition Act of 1979. Sec. 333. Includes language regarding rebates, refunds, incentive payments, and minor fees received by the Department from travel management centers, charge card programs, and other miscellaneous sources. Sec. 334. Includes language directing the transfer of an inactive Navy vessel to the Coast Guard. Sec. 335. Clarifies treatment of airport revenues in the State of Hawaii. Sec. 336. Continues provision in Fiscal Year 1997 Transportation Appropriations Act relating to the transportation of edible oils. Sec. 337. Authorizes the Secretary to repurchase preferred stock. Sec. 338. Authorizes FAA to close airports in Kansas City, MO, and Atlantic City, NJ. COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI, OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE SENATE Paragraph 7 of rule XVI requires that Committee reports on general appropriations bills identify each Committee amendment to the House bill ``which proposes an item of appropriation which is not made to carry out the provisions of an existing law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution previously passed by the Senate during that session.'' United States Coast Guard: $2,431,700,00006 403,300,00006 21,000,00006 26,000,00006 653,196,00006 65,535,00006 20,000,00006 35,000,00006 Federal Highway Administration: (21,800,000,000) 84,300,00006 8,000,00006 National Highway Traffic Safety Administration: 146,500,00006 (187,000,000) Federal Railroad Administration: 273,450,00006 26,000,00006 17,000,00006 10,000,00006 344,000,00006 Federal Transit Administration: 41,497,00006 (2,400,000,000) 6,000,00006 77,250,00006 Research and Special Programs Administration: Research and special programs, hazardous materials safety 15,492,00006 Bureau of Transportation Statistics (drawdown from Federal-aid highways) (25,000,000) COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(C), RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE SENATE Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, the Committee ordered reported en bloc H.R. 2107, the Interior appropriations bill, 1998, and S. 1048, an original Transportation appropriations bill, 1998, subject to amendment and subject to appropriate scoring, by a recorded vote of 28 0, a quorum being present. The vote was as follows: Yeas Nays Chairman Stevens Mr. Cochran Mr. Specter Mr. Domenici Mr. Bond Mr. Gorton Mr. McConnell Mr. Burns Mr. Shelby Mr. Gregg Mr. Bennett Mr. Campbell Mr. Craig Mr. Faircloth Mrs. Hutchison Mr. Byrd Mr. Inouye Mr. Hollings Mr. Leahy Mr. Bumpers Mr. Lautenberg Mr. Harkin Ms. Mikulski Mr. Reid Mr. Kohl Mrs. Murray Mr. Dorgan Mrs. Boxer COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE SENATE Paragraph 12 of rule XXVI requires that Committee reports on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any statute or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the statute or part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and (b) a comparative print of that part of the bill or joint resolution making the amendment and of the statute or part thereof proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through type and italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate typographical devices the omissions and insertions which would be made by the bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form recommended by the committee.'' In compliance with this rule, the following changes in existing law proposed to be made by the bill are shown as follows: existing law to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets; new matter is printed in italic; and existing law in which no change is proposed is shown in roman. The bill does not include any such provisions. BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93 344, AS AMENDED [In millions of dollars] Budget authority Outlays Committee allocation Amount of bill Committee allocation Amount of bill Comparison of amounts in the bill with Committee allocations to its subcommittees of amounts in the First Concurrent Resolution for 1998: Subcommittee on Transportation and Related Agencies: 59 \1\59 Projections of outlays associated with the recommendation: \2\13,231 Financial assistance to State and local governments for 1998 in bill NA 379 NA 4,488 \1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority. \2\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority. NA: Not applicable. COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 1997 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998 Item 1997 appropriation Budget estimate Committee recommendation Senate Committee recommendation compared with ( + or -) 1997 appropriation Budget estimate TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary Salaries and expenses $52,966,000 $56,136,000 $66,703,000 +$13,737,000 +$10,567,000 Office of Civil Rights 5,574,000 5,574,000 5,574,000 Transportation planning, research, and development 3,000,000 6,008,000 4,400,000 +1,400,000 -1,608,000 Transportation Administrative Service Center (124,812,000) ( -124,812,000) Payments to air carriers (Airport and Airway Trust Fund): (25,900,000) ( -25,900,000) Rental payments 127,447,000 10,567,000 -127,447,000 -10,567,000 Minority business resource center program 1,900,000 1,900,000 1,900,000 Minority business outreach 2,900,000 2,900,000 2,900,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total, Office of the Secretary 193,787,000 83,085,000 81,477,000 -112,310,000 -1,608,000 (Limitations on obligations) (25,900,000) ( -25,900,000) ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total budgetary resources (219,687,000) (83,085,000) (81,477,000) ( -138,210,000) ( -1,608,000) Coast Guard Operating expenses 2,319,725,000 2,440,000,000 2,431,700,000 +111,975,000 -8,300,000 Acquisition, construction, and improvements: -9,000,000 -9,000,000 -9,000,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Subtotal, AC&I appropriations 374,840,000 370,000,000 403,300,000 +28,460,000 +33,300,000 Environmental compliance and restoration 22,000,000 21,000,000 21,000,000 -1,000,000 Port Safety Development 5,000,000 -5,000,000 Alteration of bridges 16,000,000 26,000,000 +10,000,000 +26,000,000 Retired pay 608,084,000 645,696,000 653,196,000 +45,112,000 +7,500,000 Reserve training 65,890,000 65,000,000 65,535,000 -355,000 +535,000 Research, development, test, and evaluation 19,200,000 19,000,000 20,000,000 +800,000 +1,000,000 Boat safety (Aquatic Resources Trust Fund) 35,000,000 50,000,000 35,000,000 -15,000,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total, Coast Guard 3,476,539,000 3,910,696,000 3,655,731,000 +179,192,000 -254,965,000 Federal Aviation Administration Operations 4,957,900,000 5,036,100,000 5,325,900,000 +368,000,000 +289,800,000 Facilities and equipment (Airport and Airway Trust Fund) 1,793,500,000 1,875,000,000 1,889,004,883 +95,504,883 +14,004,883 Research, engineering, and development (Airport and Airway Trust Fund) 187,412,000 200,000,000 214,250,000 +26,838,000 +14,250,000 Grants-in-aid for airports (Airport and Airway Trust Fund): (1,500,000,000) (1,500,000,000) (1,600,000,000) ( +100,000,000) ( +100,000,000) ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total, Federal Aviation Administration 6,863,812,000 7,411,100,000 7,429,154,883 +565,342,883 +18,054,883 (Limitations on obligations) (1,460,000,000) (1,000,000,000) (1,700,000,000) ( +240,000,000) ( +700,000,000) ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total budgetary resources (8,323,812,000) (8,411,100,000) (9,129,154,883) ( +805,342,883) ( +718,054,883) Federal Highway Administration Limitation on general operating expenses (521,114,000) (494,376,000) (558,440,000) ( +37,326,000) ( +64,064,000) Highway-related safety grants (Highway Trust Fund): (2,049,000) (4,000,000) (4,000,000) ( +1,951,000) Appalachian Development Highway system 300,000,000 +300,000,000 +300,000,000 Federal-aid highways (Highway Trust Fund): (18,000,000,000) (20,170,000,000) (21,800,000,000) ( +3,800,000,000) ( +1,630,000,000) Right-of-way revolving fund 8,000,000 +8,000,000 +8,000,000 Motor carrier safety grants (Highway Trust Fund): (74,000,000) (90,000,000) (85,000,000) ( +11,000,000) ( -5,000,000) State infrastructure banks 150,000,000 -150,000,000 State infrastructure banks (Highway Trust Fund) 150,000,000 -150,000,000 Transportation infrastructure credit program (Highway Trust Fund) 100,000,000 -100,000,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total, Federal Highway Administration 150,000,000 250,000,000 308,000,000 +158,000,000 +58,000,000 (Limitations on obligations) (18,773,035,534) (20,270,000,000) (21,884,300,000) ( +3,111,264,466) ( +1,614,300,000) (Exempt obligations) (2,023,000,000) (1,510,331,000) (1,390,600,000) ( -632,400,000) ( -119,731,000) ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total budgetary resources (20,946,035,534) (22,030,331,000) (23,582,900,000) ( +2,636,864,466) ( +1,552,569,000) National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Operations and research 80,900,000 74,760,000 -6,140,000 +74,760,000 Operations and research (Highway Trust Fund) 51,712,000 147,500,000 71,740,000 +20,028,000 -75,760,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Subtotal, Operations and research 132,612,000 147,500,000 146,500,000 +13,888,000 -1,000,000 Highway traffic safety grants (Highway Trust Fund): (168,100,000) (185,000,000) (186,000,000) ( +17,900,000) ( +1,000,000) Contract authorization (Public Law 105 18) 2,500,000 -2,500,000 Contract authorization (Public Law 105 18) 500,000 -500,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total, National Highway Traffic Safety Admin 135,612,000 147,500,000 146,500,000 +10,888,000 -1,000,000 (Limitations on obligations) (168,100,000) (185,500,000) (187,000,000) ( +18,900,000) ( +1,500,000) ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total budgetary resources (303,712,000) (333,000,000) (333,500,000) ( +29,788,000) ( +500,000) Federal Railroad Administration Office of the Administrator 16,739,000 20,559,000 19,800,000 +3,061,000 -759,000 Railroad safety 51,407,000 57,067,000 57,067,000 +5,660,000 Railroad research and development 20,100,000 21,638,000 24,906,000 +4,806,000 +3,268,000 Northeast corridor improvement program 175,000,000 273,450,000 +98,450,000 +273,450,000 High-speed rail trainsets and facilities 80,000,000 -80,000,000 Next generation high speed rail 24,757,000 19,595,000 26,000,000 +1,243,000 +6,405,000 Trust fund share of next generation high-speed rail (Highway Trust Fund): (Liquidation of contract authorization) (2,855,000) ( -2,855,000) Alaska Railroad rehabilitation 10,000,000 17,000,000 +7,000,000 +17,000,000 Rhode Island Rail Development 7,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000 +3,000,000 Direct loan financing program 58,680,000 -58,680,000 Direct loan financing program limitation (400,000,000) ( -400,000,000) Grants to the National Railroad Passenger Corporation: 364,500,000 344,000,000 -20,500,000 +344,000,000 Capital grants to the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Highway Trust Fund) 445,450,000 -445,450,000 (Northeast corridor improvements) (200,000,000) ( -200,000,000) (Pennsylvania Station Redevelopment Project) (23,450,000) ( -23,450,000) Operating grants to the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Highway Trust Fund) 344,000,000 -344,000,000 Emergency railroad rehabilitation and repair: Emergency funding (Public Law 105 18) (18,900,000) ( -18,900,000) =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Total, Federal Railroad Administration 1,031,633,000 918,309,000 772,223,000 -259,410,000 -146,086,000 Federal Transit Administration Administrative expenses 41,497,000 41,497,000 +41,497,000 Administrative expenses (Highway Trust Fund, Mass Transit Account) 47,018,000 -47,018,000 Formula grants 490,000,000 90,000,000 -400,000,000 +90,000,000 Formula grants (Highway Trust Fund): (1,659,185,000) (2,310,000,000) ( +650,815,000) ( +2,310,000,000) ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Subtotal, Formula grants (2,149,185,000) (2,400,000,000) ( +250,815,000) ( +2,400,000,000) Formula programs (Highway Trust Fund, Mass Transit Account): (3,498,500,000) ( -3,498,500,000) University transportation centers 6,000,000 6,000,000 +6,000,000 Transit planning and research 85,500,000 77,250,000 -8,250,000 +77,250,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Subtotal, Transit planning and research (85,500,000) (77,250,000) ( -8,250,000) ( +77,250,000) Transit planning and research (Highway Trust Fund, Mass Transit Account) 91,800,000 -91,800,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Subtotal, Transit planning and research (91,800,000) ( -91,800,000) Trust fund share of expenses (Highway Trust Fund) (liquidation of contract authorization) (1,920,000,000) (2,310,000,000) ( +390,000,000) ( +2,310,000,000) Discretionary grants (Highway Trust Fund) (limitation on obligations): (760,000,000) (780,000,000) ( +20,000,000) ( +780,000,000) ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Subtotal, Discretionary grants (1,900,000,000) (2,000,000,000) ( +100,000,000) ( +2,000,000,000) Major capital investments (Highway Trust Fund, Mass Transit Account) (limitation on obligations) (650,000,000) ( -650,000,000) Mass capital investments (Highway Trust Fund, Mass Transit Account) (liquidation of contract authority) (2,350,000,000) ( -2,350,000,000) Mass transit capital fund (Highway Trust Fund) (liquidation of contract authorization) (2,300,000,000) (2,350,000,000) ( +50,000,000) ( +2,350,000,000) Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority 200,000,000 160,000,000 -40,000,000 +160,000,000 Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (Highway Trust Fund, Mass Transit Account) 200,000,000 -200,000,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Total, Federal Transit Administration 822,997,000 338,818,000 374,747,000 -448,250,000 +35,929,000 (Limitations on obligations) (3,559,185,000) (4,148,500,000) (4,310,000,000) ( +750,815,000) ( +161,500,000) ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total budgetary resources (4,382,182,000) (4,487,318,000) (4,684,747,000) ( +302,565,000) ( +197,429,000) Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation Operations and maintenance (Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund) 10,337,000 -10,337,000 Research and Special Programs Administration Research and special programs 26,886,000 30,102,000 28,450,000 +1,564,000 -1,652,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Subtotal, research and special programs (26,886,000) (28,450,000) ( +1,564,000) ( +28,450,000) Pipeline safety (Pipeline Safety Fund) 28,460,000 30,660,000 28,000,000 -460,000 -2,660,000 Pipeline safety (Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund) 2,528,000 2,328,000 3,000,000 +472,000 +672,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Subtotal, Pipeline safety 30,988,000 32,988,000 31,000,000 +12,000 -1,988,000 Emergency preparedness grants: Emergency preparedness fund 200,000 200,000 200,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total, Research and Special Programs Admin 58,074,000 63,290,000 59,650,000 +1,576,000 -3,640,000 Office of Inspector General Salaries and expenses 37,900,000 40,889,000 38,900,000 +1,000,000 -1,989,000 Surface Transportation Board Salaries and expenses 12,344,000 14,300,000 12,300,000 -44,000 -2,000,000 General Provisions Bureau of Transportation Statistics (transfer from Federal-aid High- ways) (25,000,000) (31,000,000) (25,000,000) ( -6,000,000) Transportation Administrative Service Center reduction -10,000,000 +10,000,000 Railroad safety offsetting collections -60,000,000 +60,000,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Net total, title I, Dept of Transportation 12,015,502,000 13,065,087,000 12,554,082,883 +538,580,883 -511,004,117 Appropriations (12,783,035,000) (13,103,687,000) (12,878,682,883) ( +95,647,883) ( -225,004,117) Rescissions ( -1,719,033,000) ( -38,600,000) ( -324,600,000) ( +1,394,433,000) ( -286,000,000) Emergency appropriations (951,500,000) ( -951,500,000) (Limitations on obligations) (23,986,220,534) (25,604,000,000) (28,081,300,000) ( +4,095,079,466) ( +2,477,300,000) (Exempt obligations) (2,023,000,000) (1,510,331,000) (1,390,600,000) ( -632,400,000) ( -119,731,000) =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Net total budgetary resources (38,024,722,534) (40,179,418,000) (42,025,982,883) ( +4,001,260,349) ( +1,846,564,883) TITLE II--RELATED AGENCIES Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board Salaries and expenses 3,540,000 3,640,000 3,640,000 +100,000 National Transportation Safety Board Salaries and expenses 42,407,000 40,000,000 49,700,000 +7,293,000 +9,700,000 Emergency fund 1,000,000 1,000,000 +1,000,000 Emergency fund (emergency appropriations) (1,000,000) ( -1,000,000) ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total, National Transportation Safety Board 42,407,000 47,000,000 50,700,000 +8,293,000 +3,700,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Total, title II, Related Agencies 82,806,000 50,640,000 54,340,000 -28,466,000 +3,700,000 Appropriations (45,947,000) (50,640,000) (54,340,000) ( +8,393,000) ( +3,700,000) Emergency appropriations (36,859,000) ( -36,859,000) TITLE III--GENERAL PROVISIONS National Civil Aviation Review Commission 2,400,000 -2,400,000 Amtrak route closure and realignment commission =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Net total appropriations 12,100,708,000 13,115,727,000 12,608,422,883 +507,714,883 -507,304,117