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49 734 cc Calendar No. 468 105 th Congress Report SENATE 2d Session 105 249 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 1999 July 15, 1998.--Ordered to be printed Mr. Shelby, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the following REPORT [To accompany S. 2307] The Committee on Appropriations reports the bill (S. 2307) making appropriations for the Department of Transportation and related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1999, and for other purposes, reports favorably thereon and recommends that the bill do pass. Amounts of new budget (obligational) authority for fiscal year 1999 Amount of bill as reported to Senate $13,694,249,569 Amount of budget estimates, 1999 13,354,129,000 Fiscal year 1998 enacted 12,720,568,766 C O N T E N T S Total obligational authority 4 Immediate Office of the Secretary 8 Office of the General Counsel 9 Office of the Assistant Secretary for Policy 9 Office of the Assistant Secretary for Aviation and International Affairs 9 Office of the Assistant Secretary for Budget and Programs 11 Office of the Assistant Secretary for Governmental Affairs 11 Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration 11 Office of Public Affairs 12 Executive Secretariat 12 Contract Appeals Board 12 Office of Intelligence and Security 12 Office of the Chief Information Officer 13 Office of Intermodalism 13 Office of Civil Rights 13 Transportation planning, research, and development 13 Transportation Administrative Service Center 15 Essential Air Service and Rural Airport Improvement Fund 16 Minority Business Resource Center Program 23 Minority business outreach 23 Amtrak Reform Council 23 Operating expenses 29 Acquisition, construction, and improvements 35 Environmental compliance and restoration 43 Alteration of bridges 43 Retired pay 43 Reserve training 44 Research, development, test, and evaluation 44 Boat safety 45 Operations 47 Facilities and equipment 57 Research, engineering, and development 75 Grants-in-aid for airports 80 Limitation on general operating expenses 88 Federal-aid highways 90 Magnetic levitation transportation 98 Appalachian development highway system 99 Motor carrier safety grants 102 Operations and research 104 Highway traffic safety grants 107 Office of the Administrator 109 Railroad safety 110 Nationwide differential global positioning system 111 Railroad research and development 112 Northeast Corridor Improvement Program 114 Railroad Rehabilitation Improvement Program 115 Next generation high-speed rail 115 Alaska railroad rehabilitation 117 Rhode Island rail development 118 Capital Grants to National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) 118 Administrative expenses 124 Formula grants 125 University transportation centers 128 Transit planning and research 128 Trust fund share of transit programs 131 Capital investment grants 131 Mass transit capital fund 160 Job access and reverse commute grants 161 Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority [WMATA] 162 Operations and maintenance 164 Research and special programs 166 Pipeline safety 169 Emergency preparedness grants 171 Salaries and expenses 172 Salaries and expenses 173 Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board: Salaries and expenses 175 National Transportation Safety Board: Salaries and expenses 175 Emergency fund 176 General provisions 177 Compliance with paragraph 7, rule XVI, of the Standing Rules of the Senate 180 Compliance with paragraph 7(c), rule XXVI, of the Standing Rules of the Senate 180 Compliance with paragraph 12, rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of the Senate 181 Budgetary impact statement 181 TOTAL OBLIGATIONAL AUTHORITY PROVIDED--GENERAL FUNDS AND TRUST FUNDS In addition to the appropriation of $13,694,249,569 in new budget authority for fiscal year 1999, large amounts of contract authority are provided by law, the obligation limits for which are contained in the annual appropriations bill. The principal items in this category are the trust funded programs for Federal-aid highways, for mass transit, and for airport development grants. For fiscal year 1999, estimated obligation limitations total $32,234,800,000. In addition, Amtrak receives a substantial subsidy from funds Congress identified in the Tax Reform Act of 1997. PROGRAM, PROJECT, AND ACTIVITY During fiscal year 1999, for the purposes of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (Public Law 99 177), as amended, with respect to appropriations contained in the accompanying bill, the terms ``program, project, and activity'' shall mean any item for which a dollar amount is contained in appropriations acts (including joint resolutions providing continuing appropriations) or accompanying reports of the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations, or accompanying conference reports and joint explanatory statements of the committee of conference. This definition shall apply to all programs for which new budget (obligational) authority is provided, as well as to discretionary grants and discretionary grant allocations made through either bill or report language. In addition, the percentage reductions made pursuant to a sequestration order to funds appropriated for facilities and equipment, Federal Aviation Administration, and for acquisition, construction, and improvements, Coast Guard, shall be applied equally to each budget item that is listed under said accounts in the budget justifications submitted to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations as modified by subsequent appropriations acts and accompanying committee reports, conference reports, or joint explanatory statements of the committee of conference. TRANSPORTATION EQUITY ACT FOR THE 21ST CENTURY The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act, the previous authorization for most Federal highway, transit, and highway safety programs, expired on September 30, 1997. On May 22, 1998, the Congress passed a new authorization bill, the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century [TEA21], which the President signed into law on June 9, 1998. Under this law, most of the authorizations are contract authority; that is, they are available for obligation without appropriation. The role of the appropriations process with respect to contract authority programs generally is to set obligation limitations so that overall Federal spending stays within legislated targets and to appropriate liquidating cash to cover the outlays associated with obligations that have been made. THE GOVERNMENT PERFORMANCE AND RESULTS ACT The Government Performance and Results Act [Results Act] requires Federal agencies to develop strategic plans and annual performance plans and reports. The first multiyear strategic plan was submitted September 30, 1997. The Committee is fully committed to support the Department as it seeks to implement the requirements of the Results Act. The Committee commends the Department for its aggressive implementation of the Results Act. In the performance plan for fiscal year 1999 that was delivered to Congress on February 23, 1998, performance measures have been identified for all of the Department's major programs. A total of 70 performance goals have been established. All of these goals are stated in terms of effects on the American public, and many reflect ambitious target levels of performance. The Department provided the performance plan shortly after receipt of budget justifications. The plan generally contained objective and measurable performance goals covering the Department's budget and are generally useful. However, the plan could be improved by consistently linking strategic goals, program activities, and performance goals. Further, the plan could be strengthened by identifying current (or potential) interagency coordination of goals and measures including discussion of the Department's proposed or potential participation in such areas. The Department's activities under the Government Performance and Results Act are clearly a work in progress. The Department has made significant strides in assessing GPRA's potential for strategically aligning the varied and numerous programs under the Department's jurisdiction. However, although the plan identifies strategies to help achieve the Department's long-term goals, the plan does not adequately describe how those strategies will lead to realization of the long-term goals or the relative contributions of each strategy. Generally, this is a shortcoming reasonably expected to be addressed as the GPRA process evolves and becomes more integrated in the policy, budget, and regulatory formulation and identification processes. However, the Committee encourages the Department to focus in particular on improvements to management to achieve outcomes as this has been a historically weak area for the Department. For example, the Committee encourages greater refinement of goals with specific and quantitable measures to provide greater definition and focus for budgetary, regulatory, and administrative actions. For clarity, the performance plan should resist identifying activities of agencies or offices under strategic goals unless there is discussion of such organizations' primary contributions toward those goals in the body of the plan. Elimination of the mention of these organizations will provide greater focus on the priorities in the strategic goal (if mention of such organization is gratuitous), or will prompt reevaluation of the organizations' roles in the achievement of the strategic goal. The performance plan still has the feel of a document designed to cover the current panoply of activities ongoing or anticipated for the Department. As the process and the plan mature, the Committee anticipates that the performance plan will become a management document rather than a reporting document. The Committee recognizes that implementation will be an iterative process, likely to involve several appropriations cycles, and will support the efforts of the Department to improve its performance plan. We will consider the Department's progress in addressing weaknesses in its annual performance plan in tandem with its funding requests. To this end, we urge the Department to examine the program activities currently supporting its budget requests in light of the Department's strategic goals and to determine whether any changes or realignments would facilitate a more accurate and informed presentation of budgetary information. The Department is encouraged to consult with the Committee as it considers such revisions prior to finalizing any requests pursuant to 31 U.S.C. 1104. The Committee will consider any requests with a view toward ensuring that fiscal year 2000 and subsequent budget submissions display amounts requested against program activity structures that bear clear relationships to performance goals. Year 2000 conversion .--The Committee notes that the Department has greatly improved its management oversight in recent months and appears to be devoting considerable resources to the year 200 conversion problem. However, the Department still has a long way to go and the Office of Management and Budget indicates that the Department, with 14.9 percent of its mission critical systems validated and 7.4 percent implemented, the Department lags well behind the Governmentwide schedule, and its assessments of four systems had not been completed as of the May reporting date. While the entire Department has year 2000 conversion issues, the most critical appear to be within the Federal Aviation Administration. The Federal Aviation Administration has taken significant steps in the last two quarters to accelerate efforts to address the year 2000 problems, but the FAA systems continue to pose a significant risk. The Office of Management and Budget specifically suggested that the FAA: * * * determine priorities for system conversion and replacement based on systems' mission criticality; develop plans for validating and testing all converted or replaced systems; and continue working to develop realistic contingency plans for all business lines to ensure the continuity of critical operations, including the availability of critical telecommunications support. Of particular concern is the FAA's HOST computer system, which is the backbone en route air traffic control. The FAA intends to replace the HOST computers at a pace sufficient to guarantee an adequate supply of spare parts for the remaining computers. FAA is continuing to assess the potential vulnerability of the system's microcode and is validating the feasibility of a date rollback as one of its potential contingency plans. The FAA's contingency planning must provide for continuity of operational capability of the National Airspace System [NAS], including scenarios when the HOST computer is not available. TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY Section 3 of the Department of Transportation Act of October 15, 1966 (Public Law 89 670) provides for establishment of the Office of the Secretary of Transportation [OST]. The Office of the Secretary is composed of the Secretary and the Deputy Secretary immediate offices, the Office of the General Counsel, and five assistant secretarial offices for transportation policy, aviation and international affairs, budget and programs, governmental affairs, and administration. These secretarial offices have policy development and central supervisory and coordinating functions related to the overall planning and direction of the Department of Transportation, including staff assistance and general management supervision of the counterpart offices in the operating administrations of the Department. The Committee recommends a total of $76,925,300 for the Office of the Secretary of Transportation including $40,000 for reception and representation expenses. The Committee is concerned about the continued level of vacancies in the Office of the Secretary and notes that many of the positions have been open for over a year. Accordingly, the appropriation for salaries and expenses has been adjusted downward to reflect current staffing levels generally across the Office of the Secretary. This adjustment is made without prejudice and will be reassessed before final enactment of this bill. In addition, the Committee is increasingly concerned about the apparent reticence on the part of the Office of Congressional Affairs to brief all impacted Committees of the Congress in a timely fashion of administration proposals directly relating to issues and accounts under those committees' jurisdiction. This concern comes directly on the heels of a constant stream of concerns by Members of Congress that matters of constituent interest are not relayed to all members of a State delegation in an even-handed and timely fashion. Unless these deficiencies are remedied immediately, the Committee will reconsider the need for a departmentwide Office of Congressional Affairs, and may resolve to transfer some of the functions to other offices in the Office of the Secretary and devolve the congressional liaison functions to the individual modal administrations. IMMEDIATE OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY The Immediate Office of the Secretary has the primary responsibility for overall policy development, central supervisory and coordinating functions necessary for the overall planning and direction of the Department. The Committee recommends $1,768,600, which is consistent with the fiscal year 1998 appropriation with controls placed on travel and PC&B growth. The Committee expects that the funding will be sufficient for the Immediate Office of the Secretary and expects that any shortfall can be accommodated by slight reductions in benefits and travel. The funding provided will allow for 16 positions. IMMEDIATE OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY SECRETARY The Immediate Office of the Deputy Secretary has the primary responsibility of assisting the Secretary in the overall planning and direction of the Department. The Committee has recommended a total of $554,700 for the Immediate Office of the Deputy Secretary. The Committee's recommendation provides for a staffing level of seven positions. OFFICE OF THE GENERAL COUNSEL The General Counsel is the chief legal officer of the Department of Transportation and the final authority within the Department on all legal questions. The General Counsel's Office provides legal services to the Office of the Secretary, coordinates and reviews the legal work of the Chief Counsels' Offices of the operating administrations, and generally performs the full range of legal services involved in administering an executive department with national and international responsibilities. With the completion of the reauthorization of the Federal-aid Highway Program, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Motor Carrier Safety Program, and Federal transit programs, the workload of the General Counsel's Office should substantially decrease, and the funds provided should be ample to carry out the duties of the Office of the General Counsel. The Committee recommends $8,645,000 for the Office of the General Counsel. At this funding level, the Committee expects that the Office will be able to fund 86 staff positions. OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR POLICY The Assistant Secretary for Policy is the primary policy officer of the Department and is responsible to the Secretary for analysis, development, articulation, and review of policies and plans for domestic transportation. The Committee recommends $2,479,500 for the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Policy. This funding level is sufficient to fund the current onboard staff. OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR AVIATION AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS The Assistant Secretary for Aviation and International Affairs is responsible for administering the economic regulatory functions regarding the airline industry and provides departmental leadership and coordination on international transportation policy issues relating to maritime, trade, technical assistance, and cooperation programs. As overseer of airline economic regulations, the Assistant Secretary is responsible for international aviation programs, the essential air service program, airline fitness and licensing, acquisitions, international route awards, and special investigations such as airline delays and computer reservations systems [CRS]. The Committee has provided $6,686,300, which will provide sufficient resources to fund 85 positions. Aviation competition guidelines. --When Congress passed the Airline Deregulation Act, it decided that the marketplace, and not regulators, should set airline prices and schedules. That landmark action has generated enormous benefits for the air traveling public. However, the Subcommittee on Transportation Appropriations has been very concerned about barriers to entry and the current health of airline competition which may distort the competitive landscape. The subcommittee has held a number of hearings over the past 2 years and one of the clear messages which has emerged from these hearings is that it is critically important to have a truly free market so that everyone, big and small, can compete. Where there is strong competition in the airline industry, the consumers are the primary beneficiaries. What should also be clear is that there is no prospect of support from the Committee to reregulate the airline industry. The Department of Transportation has recently come forth with a Proposed Statement of Enforcement Policy on Unfair Exclusionary Conduct by Airlines. The Committee applauds the Department's initiative to attempt to provide guidelines to the airlines as to what activities constitute anticompetitive activities, but the Committee is concerned that any such policy statement not undermine the very marketplace for airlines services that it is designed to foster. An incautious policy that intervenes in the wrong circumstances could itself chill the competitive process. The Committee also notes that several Committees of the Congress have held hearings and introduced legislation to promote airline competition. As the Department considers ways of providing greater certainty to the airlines as to what constitutes anticompetitive activity, the Committee encourages the Department to consider a process in which the Department, upon receiving a complaint, would consider within a specified time period whether such alleged activity should be referred to the Department of Justice or whether it was a permissible competitive activity. Such an approach would provide greater certainty for air carriers and could provide an efficient mechanism for focusing the Department of Justice's attention on the most suspect of activities. The Committee believes that such a process can be accommodated within current staffing resources and would reject a request for additional resources for the creation of an analytical or legal capability within the Department of Transportation that would also, by necessity, have to be constituted at the Department of Justice. The Committee urges the Department of Transportation to work with interested Committees of the Congress, the Department of Justice, and the airlines to implement existing laws and enforcement practices to protect the economy from anticompetitive conduct. Another concern raised during the subcommittee's hearings was that the role that travel agents play in the maintenance of a competitive landscape between airlines by virtue of the value-added services they provide for consumers might be threatened by actions taken by the major airlines. The Committee encourages the Secretary to monitor the dynamics of the airline ticketing industry and the impacts that developments in that industry have on the access of consumers to airline tickets. OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR BUDGET AND PROGRAMS The Assistant Secretary for Budget and Programs is the principal staff advisor to the Secretary on the development, review, and presentation of the Department's budget resource requirements, and on the evaluation and oversight of the Department's programs. The primary responsibilities of this Office are to ensure the effective preparation and presentation of sound and adequate budget estimates for the Department, to ensure the consistency of the Department's budget execution with the action and advice of the Congress and the Office of Management and Budget, to evaluate the program proposals for consistency with the Secretary's stated objectives, and advise the Secretary of program and legislative changes necessary to improve program effectiveness. The Committee recommends a total of $5,687,800 for the Office of Assistant Secretary for Budget and Programs. At this level, the Committee has funded the current onboard staff positions and included $40,000 for reception and representation expenses for the Secretary. OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS The Assistant Secretary for Governmental Affairs advises the Secretary on all congressional and intergovernmental activities and on all Department legislative initiatives and other relationships with Members of the Congress; promotes effective communication with other Federal agencies and regional Department officials, and with State and local governments and national organizations for development of departmental programs; and ensures that consumer preferences, awareness, and needs are brought into the decisionmaking process. The Committee recommends $1,600,000 for the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Governmental Affairs. This level holds travel below fiscal year 1998 levels and provides funding for 23 positions. OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR ADMINISTRATION The Assistant Secretary for Administration is the principal adviser to the Secretary on departmental administrative management matters, and is responsible for personnel and training, management policy, employment ceiling control systems, automated systems policy, administrative operations, real and personal property management, acquisition management, grants management, internal departmental financial systems, and ADP facilities and services. The Committee recommends $19,570,200 for the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration which includes the OST portion of rent and the majority of OST's TASC contribution. The Committee has provided a level that will support the current staffing levels with a slight reduction in travel and training activities. OFFICE OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS The Director of Public Affairs is the principal adviser to the Secretary and other senior departmental officials and news media on public affairs questions. The Office issues news releases, articles, factsheets, briefing materials, publications, and audiovisual materials. It also provides information to the Secretary on opinions and reactions of the public and news media on transportation programs and issues. The Committee recommends $1,656,600 for the Office of Public Affairs, which will support current staffing levels. EXECUTIVE SECRETARIAT The Executive Secretariat provides and organizes staff service for the Secretary and Deputy Secretary to assist them in carrying out their management functions and facilitate their responsibilities for formulating, coordinating, and communicating major policy decisions. It controls and coordinates internal and external material directed to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary and ensures that their decisions and instructions are implemented. The Committee recommends a funding level of $1,088,500 for the Executive Secretariat, sufficient resources to maintain current staffing levels. CONTRACT APPEALS BOARD The primary responsibility of the Board of Contract Appeals is to provide an independent forum for the trial and adjudication of all claims by, or against, a contractor relating to a contract of any element of the Department, as mandated by the Contract Disputes Act of 1978, 41 U.S.C. 601. The Committee has provided $460,000 for the Contract Appeals Board. This level is sufficient to maintain the current staffing level of five positions. OFFICE OF SMALL AND DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS UTILIZATION The Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization has primary responsibility for providing policy direction for small and disadvantaged business participation in the Department's procurement and grant programs, and effective execution of the functions and duties under sections 8 and 15 of the Small Business Act, as amended. The Committee recommends $1,000,000, which is sufficient funding to maintain current staffing levels. OFFICE OF INTELLIGENCE AND SECURITY The Office of Intelligence and Security within the Office of the Secretary coordinates security and intelligence policies and strategies among the modes of transportation and serves as liaison with other Government intelligence and law enforcement agencies. The Committee recommends $935,000 for the Office of Intelligence and Security. This level is sufficient to maintain the current staffing levels of nine positions and current activities of the office. OFFICE OF THE CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER The Committee recommends $4,652,700 for the Office of the Chief Information Officer. This level is sufficient to maintain the current staffing level of 15 positions. OFFICE OF INTERMODALISM The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for the Office of Intermodalism. This level is sufficient to maintain current staffing and activity levels with modest reductions in travel and the initiation of new projects. OFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS The Office of Civil Rights is responsible for advising the Secretary on civil rights and equal employment opportunity matters, formulating civil rights policies and procedures for the operating administrations, investigating claims that small businesses were denied certification or improperly certified as disadvantaged business enterprises, and overseeing the Department's conduct of its civil rights responsibilities and making final determinations on civil rights complaints. In addition, the Civil Rights Office is responsible for enforcing laws and regulations which prohibit discrimination in federally operated and federally assisted transportation programs. The Committee has provided a funding level of $5,562,000 for the Office of Civil Rights. The Committee notes the unusually high number of vacancies in the Office of Civil Rights, and expects the Director to fill these positions as soon as possible. In addition, the Committee is aware of the persistent carryover load of EEO cases and encourages the director to explore alternative means of managing the caseload. Options to be explored should include contracting out and cost-sharing arrangements with the administrations generating the largest portion of the Office's caseload. TRANSPORTATION PLANNING, RESEARCH, AND DEVELOPMENT Appropriations, 1998\1\ $4,400,000 Budget estimate, 1999 4,710,000 Committee recommendation 8,328,400 \1\Does not include reduction for TASC pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66. The Office of the Secretary performs those research activities and studies which can more effectively or appropriately be conducted at the departmental level. This research effort supports the planning, research and development activities, and systems development needed to assist the Secretary in the formulation of national transportation policies. The program is carried out primarily through contracts with other Federal agencies, educational institutions, nonprofit research organizations, and private firms. Policy studies .--The recommended level for policy studies for the development and implementation of transportation economic policy and for the development of environmental energy and safety policy has been reduced by $200,000. Transportation planning .--The recommended level includes funding for transportation planning assistance for the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City and for planning and logistical support for the 1999 Special Olympics World Summer Games and the 2001 Special Olympic World Winter Games. Missing children .--The Committee is aware of the effective work of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children to combat crimes against children and to reunite abducted or runaway children with their families. There are many opportunities in the transportation sector to alert the public to the status of a missing child. For example, truckstops, airports, rail and bus stations, and other transportation facilities are utilized by millions of Americans every day. These are ideal places to raise public awareness of missing children. Moreover, employees in the transportation sector, including flight attendants, bus and truck drivers, and ticket agents, come into contact with hundreds of individuals every day and could be a key element in identifying abducted children. When nonlaw enforcement entities adopt procedures that hinder pedophiles and kidnappers, they are doing a much needed public service. Of note is WalMart's Code Adam Program. When a child disappears in a participating store, Code Adam is addressed over the public address system. Store personnel immediately stop work to look for the child and monitor all exits. If the missing child is not located in 10 minutes, or is seen with someone other than a parent or guardian, the police are called. This program is implemented in all 2,800 WalMart and Sam's Club stores. The Committee urges the transportation sector to consider similar programs. The Committee directs the Secretary and each of the modal administrators to work with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children and the transportation industry to identify and implement initiatives to maximize the transportation sector's involvement in the effort to relocate missing children. The Committee directs the Secretary to report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations no later than March 31, 1999, on the identified initiatives in this area and the actions taken to implement those efforts. Transportation noise model .--The Department of Transportation should continue research toward developing a multimodal acoustic noise model that encompasses all transportation related noise sources, so as to efficiently minimize combined impact on community noise. No later than January 1, 1999, the Department shall provide the Committee a plan for achieving this goal. The Department should continue to improve the transportation noise model [TNM] by incorporating neglected but relevant propagation phenomena that affect community noise, such as atmospheric effects. While the Department continues research toward developing a multimodal acoustic noise model, it should require concurrent use of TNM and its previous noise prediction model. Freight mobility .--The recommended level includes $40,000 for a joint freight mobility study to initiate and coordinate a freight mobility system in Washington State to focus on the freight movement problems of the Puget Sound region. Special attention should be given to improving business practices to mitigate the freight mobility problems in the region. Flood project alternatives research .--Flooding in the Interstate 5 corridor at Centralia/Chehalis in Washington State compromises freight mobility in the corridor and presents a unique opportunity to provide a coordinated approach between flood control projects and highway construction. The Committee provides $250,000 and directs the Secretary to work with the Lewis County Economic Development Corp., the Washington State Department of Ecology, and Grays Harbor County to further efforts to identify and conduct preliminary work on a basinwide solution to this transportation problem as a pilot program for other flood plain and highway conflicts. TRANSPORTATION ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICE CENTER Limitation, 1998\1\ ($121,800,000) Budget estimate, 1999\2\ (175,715,000) Committee recommendation (165,215,000) \1\Does not reflect reduction pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66. \2\Proposed without limitations. The Transportation Administrative Service Center [TASC] provides a business operation fund for DOT to provide a wide range of administrative services to the Department and other customers. TASC functions as an entrepreneurial and self-sufficient entity and provides competitive quality services responsive to customer needs. The TASC is governed by a Board of Directors composed of customer agencies operating in a competitive business-like environment. The TASC presents proposed operating and financial plans to the Board at the beginning of each fiscal year. Once the Board has approved those plans the TASC provides products and services to its full customer base. The Director of TASC provides quarterly performance and financial reports to the Board, makes recommendations for changes to the approved plans and is responsible for the day-to-day management of the TASC. DOT administrations must procure consolidated administrative services from the TASC unless a financial analysis of the services demonstrates that it is more cost beneficial to the Department as a whole--not to an individual operating entity alone--to change the nature of the service delivery (to consolidate a service or to decentralize a service). TASC services are being marketed to customers outside DOT to provide greater economies of scale, thus reducing costs to individual customers. TASC services include: --Functions formerly in DOT's working capital fund [WCF]; --Office of the Secretary [OST] personnel, procurement and information technology support operations; --Systems development staff; --Operations of the consolidated departmental dockets facilities; and --Certain departmental services and administrative operations, such as human resources management programs, transit fare subsidy payments, and employee wellness including substance awareness and testing. All of the services of the TASC will be financed through customer reimbursements, to the extent possible, on a fee-for-service basis. The bill includes language that includes a limitation on activities financed through the transportation administrative service center at $165,215,000. The limitation shall not apply to non-DOT entities and the Committee directs that activities shall be provided on a competitive basis. Further, the Committee directs that the Department shall submit with the Department's congressional budget submission an approved annual operating plan of the transportation administrative service center and quarterly reports to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations. ESSENTIAL AIR SERVICE AND RURAL AIRPORT IMPROVEMENT FUND Appropriations, 1998 (mandatory authority)\1\ $50,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 (mandatory authority) 50,000,000 Committee recommendation (mandatory authority) 50,000,000 \1\Transfer from FAA operations. The Essential Air Service [EAS] and Rural Airport Improvement Program provides funds directly to commuter/regional airlines to provide air service to small communities that otherwise would not receive air service and for rural airport improvement as provided by the 1996 Federal Aviation Reauthorization Act. The Federal Aviation Reauthorization Act of 1996 authorizes $100,000,000 in user fees for flights that fly over, but do not land in, the United States. The first $50,000,000 of each year's fees go directly to carry out the Essential Air Service Program and, to the extent not used for essential air service, to improve rural airport safety. If $50,000,000 in fees is not available, funding must be transferred from other FAA appropriations to the EAS programs. Many EAS points are located in remote rural areas: 57 of 69 communities served by the Essential Air Service Program are more than 100 highway miles from the nearest small, medium, or large hub airport. Twenty-six more communities are located in Alaska, where, in all but two cases, year-round road access does not exist, and in many instances does not exist at all. Recognizing the critical importance of EAS service to these communities, the Committee intends that service in Alaska not be reduced. Without air service, such communities would be further isolated from the Nation's economic centers. Moreover, businesses are typically interested in locating in areas that have convenient access to scheduled air service. Loss of service would seriously hamper small communities' ability to attract new business or even to retain those they now have, resulting in further strain on local economies and loss of jobs. The Committee has retained the general provision which limits the number of communities that receive EAS funding by excluding points in the 48 contiguous United States that are located fewer than 70 highway miles from the nearest large or medium hub airport, or that require a subsidy in excess of $200 per passenger unless such a point is more than 210 miles from the nearest large or medium hub airport. The following table reflects the points currently receiving service and the annual rates as of the end of March 1998. The $50,000,000 funding level is more than sufficient to maintain current service levels and quality of service at the communities currently served by the EAS program. In the lower 48 States, the tables show distances that EAS communities are from other air service centers and subsidy-per-passenger calculations. The distance figures are shown to give a sense of the degree of isolation of the communities, and the subsidy-per-passenger figures are a rough measure of the cost of providing the service compared to the number of passengers benefiting from the service. Neither of those calculations are particularly relevant to Alaska. First, only three of the 26 subsidized communities in Alaska have road access to other air service. Thus, the Alaskan communities are clearly among the most isolated in the Nation. In fact, many are islands and would be all but cut off from the rest of the world without air service. Second, any subsidy-per-passenger calculation would be highly misleading, at best. While subsidy-per-passenger may be used as a crude measure of cost benefit in the lower 48, in many of the subsidized EAS markets the principal traffic being carried on the EAS flights is food being delivered to the bush community. Thus, the whole community benefits--indeed is fully dependent on--the EAS flights, not just the few who may actually travel on the flights. EAS SUBSIDY RATES AS OF JUNE 1, 1997 AND MARCH 1, 1998 States/communities Estimated mileage to nearest hub (small, medium, or large)\1\ Average daily enplanements at EAS point (year ending June 30, 1997) Annual subsidy rates as of June 1, 1997 Subsidy per passenger\2\ Current annual subsidy rates (March 1, 1998) Arizona: 101 6.9 $155,369 $51 $411,217 Arkansas: 108 5.5 569,344 112 943,347 California: 234 26.0 151,450 12 189,043 Colorado: 162 16.6 (\3\) (\3\) (\3\) Hawaii: Kamuela 39 4.4 292,061 181 335,454 Illinois: 126 5.1 182,319 62 218,783 Iowa: Ottumwa 85 4.5 382,072 181 458,485 Kansas: 149 9.9 146,225 28 611,661 Maine: 71 10.1 330,080 53 595,320 Michigan: 236 15.1 141,363 37 494,668 Minnesota: 121 (\5\) (\5\) (\5\) 678,375 Missouri: 138 14.1 108,120 24 295,466 Montana: 280 6.1 387,540 110 684,766 Nebraska: 256 3.9 346,863 296 797,133 Nevada: Ely 237 3.0 508,759 335 867,188 New Hampshire: Keene 56 5.3 382,283 132 737,926 New Mexico: 91 11.3 188,923 28 656,745 New York: 118 10.2 132,540 28 266,371 North Dakota: 396 12.7 415,506 53 678,375 Oklahoma: 84 5.1 381,517 121 767,398 Pennsylvania: Oil City/Franklin 86 24.2 118,373 9 243,923 South Dakota: 57 (\5\) (\5\) (\5\) 678,375 Texas: Brownwood 138 2.9 499,109 227 807,717 Utah: 178 21.8 292,882 26 577,538 Vermont: Rutland 69 10.6 382,283 62 737,926 Washington: Ephrata/Moses Lake 108 40.8 177,628 9 219,483 West Virginia: 173 8.5 270,835 60 618,017 Wyoming: 144 35.3 (\3\) (\3\) (\3\) \1\Hub designations are recalculated annually and published by the FAA in the Airport Activity Statistics. The above distances are based on the 1997 Airport Activity Statistics, which is based on calendar year 1996 passenger data. \2\Rounded to the nearest dollar. \3\Subsidy rate under negotiation. \4\There was an extended service hiatus during the year ended June 30, 1997; thus, no meaningful calculation can be made. \5\Either no service or subsidy rate in place. NOTE.--The Department has authorized subsidy for service levels that meet at least the statutory minimums beginning in fiscal year 1998, that is, October 1, 1998. The enplanements per day, on the other hand, reflect the subminimum service levels of ten round trips a week. GSA RENTAL PAYMENTS [Dollars and square feet in thousands] Administration Fiscal year 1997 enacted\1\ Fiscal year 1997 GSA billings Fiscal year 1998 estimate Fiscal year 1999 estimate Funding Square feet Funding Square feet Funding Square feet Federal Highway Administration [$17,294] [1,078] [$17,369] $17,480 1,077 $17,922 1,076 National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 217 4,361 4,234 217 4,042 206 Federal Railroad Administration 143 4,075 2,930 123 2,753 112 Federal Transit Administration 152 3,091 3,239 155 3,030 140 Federal Aviation Administration 4,170 68,833 67,500 4,047 77,887 4,226 U.S. Coast Guard 2,363 35,886 36,472 2,367 35,285 2,321 St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation 10 198 199 10 Research and Special Programs Administration 105 2,041 2,075 106 1,965 98 Office of Inspector General 110 2,202 2,350 110 2,186 100 Office of the Secretary of Transportation [OST] 302 6,334 6,215 284 6,045 270 Transportation Administrative Service Center 304 6,455 6,640 300 8,982 386 Bureau of Transportation Statistics 24 489 660 24 750 25 OST rental payments to GSA 127,447 7,900 133,965 ----------- ---------------- ----------- -------------- --------- ------------- ------- Subtotal 127,447 7,900 133,965 149,994 8,820 160,847 8,960 =========== ================ =========== ============== ========= ============= ======= Federal Highway Administration 17,294 1,078 17,369 ----------- ---------------- ----------- -------------- --------- ------------- ------- Subtotal, consolidated account 144,741 8,978 151,334 =========== ================ =========== ============== ========= ============= ======= Maritime Administration 4,433 286 4,361 4,684 286 4,364 287 Surface Transportation Board 1,471 56 1,471 1,488 56 1,517 56 ----------- ---------------- ----------- -------------- --------- ------------- ------- Total, Department of Transportation 150,645 9,320 157,166 156,166 9,162 166,728 9,303 \1\Enacted as a single account under the Office of the Secretary of Transportation. Fiscal year 1997 directed the reimbursement of FHWA GSA rent from FHWA LGOE account to the consolidated account. Requirements for fiscal year 1997 are best represented by the actual billings. There was no distribution made of the enacted amount of $144,741,000. MINORITY BUSINESS RESOURCE CENTER PROGRAM Appropriations, 1998 $1,900,000 Budget estimate, 1999 1,900,000 Committee recommendation 1,900,000 Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization [OSDBU]/Minority Business Resource Center [MBRC]. --The OSDBU/MBRC provides assistance in obtaining short-term working capital and bonding for disadvantaged, minority, and women-owned businesses [DBE/MBE/WBE's]. In fiscal year 1999, the short-term loan program will continue to focus on the lending of working capital to DBE/MBE/WBE's for transportation-related projects in order to strengthen their competitive and productive capabilities. The Committee encourages the Minority Business Resource Center to work with Stillman College to assist students in understanding the opportunities and challenges facing young entrepreneurs in the transportation industry. Since fiscal year 1993, the loan program has been a separate line item appropriation, which segregated such activities in response to changes made by the Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990. The limitation on direct loans under the Minority Business Resource Center is at the administration's requested level of $13,775,000. Of the funds appropriated, $1,500,000 covers the direct subsidy costs for loans not to exceed $13,775,000; and, $400,000 is for administrative expenses to carry out the Direct Loan Program. MINORITY BUSINESS OUTREACH Appropriations, 1998 $2,900,000 Budget estimate, 1999 2,900,000 Committee recommendation 2,900,000 This appropriation provides contractual support to assist minority business firms, entrepreneurs, and venture groups in securing contracts and subcontracts arising out of projects that involve Federal spending. It also provides support to historically black and Hispanic colleges. Separate funding is requested by the administration since this program provides grants and contract assistance that serves DOT-wide goals and not just OST purposes. AMTRAK REFORM COUNCIL Appropriations, 1998\1\ $2,450,000 Budget estimate, 1999\2\ 500,000 Committee recommendation 450,000 \1\Of the amount provided, $1,970,000 was utilized for the contract on the independent assessment of Amtrak, required by sections 202 and 409 of the Amtrak Reform and Accountability Act (Public Law 105 134); and $400,000 was transferred to the DOT inspector general for new responsibilities associated with section 409(c) of Public Law 105 134, leaving a balance for the Council of approximately $80,000. \2\In the administration's budget request, both the independent assessment of Amtrak's financial status and the Amtrak Reform Council are to be funded within this requested amount. This funding was requested as part of the capital grants to the National Passenger Railroad Corporation. The Committee recommends an appropriation of $450,000 for necessary expenses of the Amtrak Reform Council [ARC]. Initial funding for the ARC was provided in the fiscal year 1998 supplemental appropriations bill, Public Law 105 174. The Amtrak Reform and Accountability Act of 1997 [ARAA] directs the establishment of an independent commission to be known as the Amtrak Reform Council. The ARC consists of 11 members, including four Senate appointees, four House appointees, two Presidential appointees, and the Secretary of Transportation. To date, the ARC slate has not been filled--one of the Presidential appointees has not yet been named. However, the ARC has begun meeting and coordinating with the DOT inspector general and other interested parties. The ARC members serve without pay, but receive travel expenses and per diem. Under the ARAA, the responsibilities of the ARC include evaluating Amtrak's performance and making recommendations to Congress and Amtrak for achieving further cost containment, productivity improvements, and financial reforms. The most important tool for the ARC's evaluation of Amtrak's performance will be the independent assessment of Amtrak's financial requirements through the end of fiscal year 2002, as required in section 202 of the ARAA. The contract for the independent assessment was let on May 5, 1998, to Battelle Memorial Institute, and will be completed in early November. The contractor is reviewing Amtrak's financial reports, business planning documents, and management consultant studies in order to develop a comprehensive assessment of Amtrak's financial condition. This will independently verify Amtrak's accounting methods, to determine whether assumptions made by Amtrak, on which the Corporation has built their strategic business plan, can be successfully borne out in future operating and capital investment decisions. Although the ARC will not have the results of the independent assessment until November 1998, the Committee lauds the decision to begin working toward meeting its legislative charge. As a practical matter, the ARC is a temporary commission. After December 1999, the Commission must make a determination on whether or not Amtrak can meet the financial goals outlined in the ARAA. If the ARC determines these goals cannot be met, they must then submit a restructuring plan, and Amtrak must submit a liquidation plan. The Committee's recommended funding level, $450,000, will allow the ARC to decisively move forward in performing its tasks and responsibilities. These funds are available for 2 years, through September 30, 2000. The Committee is aware that the members of the ARC have been selected based on their technical qualifications, professional standing, and demonstrated expertise in areas relevant to the needs of the Council. Therefore, there should be no need for outside consultant services, and the Committee has included a provision precluding the use of appropriated funds for such services. Route closure and realignment recommendations. --Under current authority, the ARC can recommend improvements or changes in law that it believes to be necessary or appropriate, including recommending that the Amtrak Board of Directors close down or consolidate unprofitable routes. In addition, the sunset trigger in the ARAA directs the ARC to notify the President and the appropriate congressional committees if Amtrak's business performance prevents the railroad from meeting its financial goals, or if the ARC determines that continued Federal operating subsidies will be required after December 2, 2002. In order to help Amtrak work toward meeting its financial goals and to decrease reliance on Federal subsidies, the ARC shall identify Amtrak routes which are candidates for closure or realignment, and report to the Congress annually, as required under the ARAA, on these recommendations. The process for determining candidate routes for closure or realignment shall be based on Amtrak's own performance rankings, which incorporate information on each route's fully allocated costs and ridership on core intercity passenger service. A May 1998 General Accounting Office report entitled ``Financial Performance of Amtrak's Routes'' (GAO/RCED 98 151) examined the operating ratios for all of Amtrak's 40 intercity routes during fiscal year 1997, and ranked the routes by performance. The only profitable route on Amtrak's system is the New York to Washington, DC Metroliner. All other Amtrak routes lose money on a per passenger basis, from a low of $11 lost per passenger trip to a high of $284 lost per passenger. The average systemwide per passenger loss is $47. Though the Committee recognizes that the issue of connectivity is important to any passenger rail system, it is imperative that these losses be stemmed by judicious reductions and rationalizations. The Committee has determined that making recommendations for route closures or realignments is a task that is complementary to the Amtrak Reform Council's mission, and is well within the scope of the ARC's statutory responsibilities. General Provisions Political and Presidential appointees .--The Committee has included a provision in the bill (sec. 305), which is similar to general provisions that have been included in previous appropriations acts, which limits the number of political and Presidential appointees within the Department of Transportation. The Committee is recommending that the ceiling for fiscal year 1999 be 91 personnel. Advisory committees .--The Committee has retained a general provision (sec. 327) which would limit the amount of funds that could be used for the expenses of advisory committees utilized by the Department of Transportation. The limitation specified is $1,000,000. Rebates, refunds, and incentive payments .--The Department receives funds from various Government programs at different time intervals (that is, weekly, monthly, quarterly). For example, under the General Services Administration's Travel Management Center [TMC] Program, rebate checks received from the travel contractor are distributed monthly to each element of the Department in proportion to net domestic airline sales arranged by the contractor. Past expenditures have to be analyzed to determine the proper sources to refund which can be a time-consuming process. The staff time and cost associated with the precise accounting for each such refund is prohibitive. To alleviate the need to specifically identify the source for each repayment the Committee has included language (sec. 333) that allows a fair and sensible allocation of the rebates and miscellaneous and other funds. Many repayments are received late in the fourth quarter of the fiscal year or in the first quarter of the new fiscal year and thus are not effectively available to the agency for new obligations. For example, rebate checks for September travel are received from the travel management contractor in October. To maintain good financial management incentives and avoid injudicious commitments, this provision would provide specific authority to use rebated funds for program purposes beyond the fiscal year of the appropriation charged for the initial payment. Other User fees .--The Committee has included bill language, included in previous appropriations bills, which permits the Office of the Secretary to continue to credit to this account $1,000,000 in user fees. Reductions in fiscal year 1998 appropriations .--In fiscal year 1998, reductions were made to a number of accounts due to limitations or reductions imposed in various areas, such as the Transportation Administration Services Center and the Presidential line-item veto. In the Senate Committee report, each account head shows the amount appropriated in Public Law 105 66 before the various reductions were made. The table below depicts the amount of funds appropriated for each of the accounts, and the reductions required. CHANGES IN FISCAL YEAR 1998 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION APPROPRIATIONS Account Public Law 105 66 President's line-item veto Public Law 105 119 Net appropriation Appropriations GP 320 TASC Appropriations transfer from DOS Office of the Secretary: $61,000,000 -$343,000 $60,657,000 ---------------- ------------- ---------------------------------- ----------- --------------- Subtotal -363,000 ================ ============= ================================== =========== =============== U.S. Coast Guard: Operating expenses (includes $300,000,000 for defense-related activities) 2,715,400,000 -529,000 $63,000 2,714,934,000 ================ ============= ================================== =========== =============== Federal Aviation Administration: Operations 5,301,934,000 -939,000 1,554,000 5,302,549,000 ================ ============= ================================== =========== =============== Federal Highway Administration: (552,266,000) ( -610,000) (551,656,000) ---------------- ------------- ---------------------------------- ----------- --------------- Subtotal -657,000 ================ ============= ================================== =========== =============== National Highway Traffic Safety Administration: 74,901,000 -81,000 74,820,000 ---------------- ------------- ---------------------------------- ----------- --------------- Subtotal -178,000 ================ ============= ================================== =========== =============== Federal Railroad Administration: 20,290,000 -29,000 20,261,000 ---------------- ------------- ---------------------------------- ----------- --------------- Subtotal -49,000 -5,280,000 ================ ============= ================================== =========== =============== Federal Transit Administration: 45,738,000 -124,000 45,614,000 ---------------- ------------- ---------------------------------- ----------- --------------- Subtotal -124,000 -500,000 ================ ============= ================================== =========== =============== St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation: Operations and maintenance 11,200,000 -7,000 11,193,000 Research and Special Programs Administration: 28,450,000 -48,000 -450,000 27,952,000 ---------------- ------------- ---------------------------------- ----------- --------------- Subtotal -92,000 -450,000 ================ ============= ================================== =========== =============== Office of the Inspector General: Salaries and expenses 42,000,000 -59,000 41,941,000 ================ ============= ================================== =========== =============== Bureau of Transportation Statistics\1\ (25,000,000) ( -47,000) (24,953,000) ================ ============= ================================== =========== =============== Surface Transportation Board: Salaries and expenses 13,853,000 -3,000 13,850,000 ================ ============= ================================== =========== =============== Total reductions, Department of Transportation -3,000,000 -6,230,000 1,617,000 \1\BTS reductions in parentheses included under Federal-aid highways. U.S. COAST GUARD SUMMARY OF FISCAL YEAR 1999 PROGRAM The U.S. Coast Guard, as it is known today, was established on January 28, 1915, through the merger of the Revenue Cutter Service and the Lifesaving Service. In 1939, the U.S. Lighthouse Service was transferred to the Coast Guard, followed by the Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation in 1942. The Coast Guard has as its primary responsibilities the enforcement of all applicable Federal laws on the high seas and waters subject to the jurisdiction of the United States; promotion of safety of life and property at sea; assistance to navigation; protection of the marine environment; and maintenance of a state of readiness to function as a specialized service in the Navy in time of war (14 U.S.C. 1, 2). The Committee recommends a total program level of $3,959,757,000 for the activities of the Coast Guard in fiscal year 1999. The following table summarizes the Committee's recommendations: [In thousands of dollars] Program Fiscal year-- Committee recommendations 1998 enacted 1999 estimate Operating expenses\1\\2\ 2,715,400 2,771,705 2,761,603 Acquisition, construction, and improvements\3\\4\ 397,850 442,773 388,693 Environmental compliance and restoration 21,000 21,000 21,000 Alteration of bridges 17,000 20,000 Retired pay 653,196 684,000 684,000 Reserve training 67,000 67,000 67,000 Research, development, test, and evaluation 19,000 18,300 17,461 Boat safety 35,000 -------------- --------------- ----------- Total 3,925,446 4,004,778 3,959,757 \1\Excludes reduction for TASC pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66; excludes transfer from Department of State pursuant to Public Law 105 119. \2\Fiscal year 1998 enacted and fiscal year 1999 Committee recommended amount include $300,000,000 in defense discretionary funding; fiscal year 1999 estimate includes $309,000,000, both amounts for national security activities of the Coast Guard and scored against budget function 050 (defense). \3\Includes $9,000,000 for fiscal year 1998 and $1,000,000 for fiscal year 1999 in proposed asset sales. \4\Fiscal year 1999 estimate includes $35,000,000 in proposed navigation assistance tax fees. OPERATING EXPENSES General Trust Total Appropriations, 1998\1\ $2,690,400,000 $25,000,000 $2,715,400,000 Budget estimate, 1999\2\ 2,746,705,000 25,000,000 2,771,705,000 Committee recommendation\3\ 2,741,603,000 25,000,000 2,761,603,000 Secretary's discretionary transfer authority 60,000,000 60,000,000 ---------------- ------------- ---------------- Total available funds 2,793,603,000 25,000,000 2,821,603,000 \1\Includes $300,000,000 for national security activities scored against budget function 050 (defense). Excludes reductions for TASC pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66; excludes transfer from Department of State pursuant to Public Law 105 119. \2\Includes $309,000,000 for national security activities scored against budget function 050 (defense). \3\Includes $300,000,000 for national security activities scored against budget function 050 (defense). The ``Operating expenses'' appropriation provides funds for the operation and maintenance of multipurpose vessels, aircraft, and shore units strategically located along the coasts and inland waterways of the United States and in selected areas overseas. The program activities of this appropriation fall into the following categories: Search and rescue. --One of its earliest and most traditional missions, the Coast Guard maintains a nationwide system of boats, aircraft, cutters, and rescue coordination centers on 24-hour alert. Aids to navigation. --To help mariners determine their location and avoid accidents, the Coast Guard maintains a network of manned and unmanned aids to navigation along our coasts and on our inland waterways, and operates radio stations in the United States and abroad to serve the needs of the armed services and marine and air commerce. Marine safety. --The Coast Guard insures compliance with Federal statutes and regulations designed to improve safety in the merchant marine industry and operates a recreational boating safety program. Marine environmental protection. --The primary objectives of this program are to minimize the dangers of marine pollution and to assure the safety of U.S. ports and waterways. Enforcement of laws and treaties. --The Coast Guard is the principal maritime enforcement agency with regard to Federal laws on the navigable waters of the United States and the high seas, including fisheries, drug smuggling, illegal immigration, and hijacking of vessels. Ice operations. --In the Arctic and Antarctic, Coast Guard icebreakers escort supply ships, support research activities and Department of Defense operations, survey uncharted waters, and collect scientific data. The Coast Guard also assists commercial vessels through ice-covered waters. Defense readiness. --During peacetime the Coast Guard maintains an effective state of military preparedness to operate as a service in the Navy in time of war or national emergency at the direction of the President. As such the Coast Guard has primary responsibility for the security of ports, waterways, and navigable waters up to 200 miles offshore. COMMITTEE FUNDING RECOMMENDATION The Committee recommendation for Coast Guard operating expenses is $2,761,603,000, including $25,000,000 from the oilspill liability trust fund and $300,000,000 from function 050 for the Coast Guard defense-related activities. The Committee notes that the cost per average FTE for the Coast Guard in the most recent complete fiscal year is $65,560. The anticipated cost per average FTE for fiscal year 1998 is $69,630. The Committee recommendation provides sufficient resources for an average FTE cost greater than that anticipated for fiscal year 1998 at staffing levels above current levels. The Committee also notes that the 5-year FTE experience indicates that the Coast Guard tends to lag behind requested FTE levels. The Committee encourages the Coast Guard to strive to reduce the ratio of officers to enlisted and to report to the Committee by March 1, 1999, on the officer-to-enlisted ratio over the past 10 years with comparable officer-to-enlisted ratios from the other services. [In thousands of dollars] Fiscal year 1998 enacted\1\ Budget request Committee recommendation Personnel resources: 1,246,767 1,292,406 1,290,029 ----------------------------- ---------------- -------------------------- Total, personnel resources 1,702,298 1,762,471 1,752,673 ============================= ================ ========================== Operating funds and unit level maintenance: 114,009 109,563 109,563 District commands: 1st district 37,711 36,831 36,831 7th district 46,400 47,532 47,532 8th district 29,894 30,044 30,044 9th district 18,205 18,583 18,583 13th district 13,749 13,887 13,887 14th district 9,838 10,655 10,655 17th district 20,693 19,805 20,693 ----------------------------- ---------------- -------------------------- Total, operating funds and unit level maintenance 617,530 619,593 619,289 ============================= ================ ========================== Depot level maintenance: 154,261 152,391 152,391 ----------------------------- ---------------- -------------------------- Total, depot level maintenance 395,106 389,641 389,641 ============================= ================ ========================== Total appropriation 2,714,934 2,771,705 2,761,603 \1\Includes reduction of $529,000,000 for TASC pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66; includes transfer of $63,000,000 from Department of State pursuant to Public Law 105 119. Note.--Fiscal year 1998 enacted and fiscal year 1999 request include $300,000,000 and $309,000,000, respectively, for national security activities, budget function 050 (defense). PERSONNEL RESOURCES Military pay and benefits. --The Coast Guard is to be commended for the progress that has been made over the past several years to streamline and increase the efficiency of the uniformed services. Staffing continues to lag behind recruiting goals, in part because of the competition for qualified individuals that is endemic to the current robust state of the economy. However, the 5-year FTE utilization experience of the Coast Guard indicates that they continue to run behind requested levels and accordingly, the Committee recommends a reduction in the FTE levels and a commensurate reduction in the military pay and benefits request. The Committee also notes that the streamlining effort has not yet been fully reflected throughout the ranks and trusts that the Commandant will continue to pursue the streamlining efforts of his predecessor and seek a ratio of officers to enlisted personnel consistent with the other armed services and the unique nature of the Coast Guard's multiple mission requirements. International engagement in Caribbean. --The Committee has not included funding for the mobile, ship-based support and training buoy tender platform as requested in the budget, without prejudice. Although this may be a worthwhile foreign policy initiative, the budgetary constraints already facing the Coast Guard make such an addition to the Coast Guard's mission profile an unwarranted diversion of operating funding from other critical missions. Military health care .--The Committee has provided $121,800,000 for military health care, an increase of $2,399,000 over fiscal year 1998 levels. The Committee supports the Alaska Federal Health Care Partnership's proposal to develop an Alaska-wide telemedicine network to provide access to health services and health education information in remote areas of Alaska to the more than 200,000 Federal beneficiaries now living or stationed in Alaska, including more than 3,000 Coast Guard beneficiaries. The partnership, a joint effort of the Coast Guard, Department of Defense, Department of Veterans Affairs, and the Indian Health Service will create 235 telemedicine health care access sites at Coast Guard, DOD, VA and IHS clinical facilities throughout Alaska linking remote installations and villages with tertiary health facilities located in Anchorage and Fairbanks over a 4-year period and should serve as a model for the use of telemedicine technology for the delivery of health care services and health care education in remote settings. The Committee has provided funding for the Coast Guard to participate in the partnership's Alaska telemedicine project. Training and education .--The recruiting and training support category has several subsets, including recruiting, training centers (Yorktown, VA; Petaluma, CA; and Cape May, NJ), the Coast Guard Academy, and professional training and education. The Committee has provided $65,012,000 consistent with the budget request. The Committee believes that the Coast Guard has done a good job in trying to hold costs down, and though its budget for professional training and education is sizable, further cuts are not necessary at this time and would undermine the Coast Guard's efforts to recruit and train to meet personnel needs in a streamlined Coast Guard. OPERATING FUNDS AND UNIT LEVEL MAINTENANCE BILL LANGUAGE National security .--The Committee's recommendation includes $300,000,000 from the defense function for Coast Guard support of national security activities. The Coast Guard plays a key role in support of military missions under the U.S. Atlantic and Southern Commands in support of drug interdiction missions, refugee and immigration support, and enforcement and joint military training. The Coast Guard is a cost-effective force which is multimissioned. Its ships, aircraft, shore units, and people have four primary roles: maritime safety, maritime law enforcement, marine environmental protection, and national defense. These roles are complementary and contribute to the Coast Guard's unique niche within the national security community. The value of the Coast Guard forces and their mission experience was clearly evident by their active participation in Operations Desert Shield/Storm in the Persian Gulf, and more recently, in Operation Desert Thunder in the Persian Gulf and Operations Restore/Uphold Democracy in Haiti. The Coast Guard is one of the five Armed Forces, and is a full partner on the joint national security team. To be a credible partner, the Coast Guard must maintain a high state of operational readiness. Many parts of the Coast Guard's budget contain funding requests that, if cut, would severely impair the Coast Guard's operational readiness and, therefore, its ability to meet national security commitments. GENERAL PROVISIONS Vessel traffic safety fairway, Santa Barbara/San Francisco .--The Committee has included a general provision (sec. 313) that would prohibit funds to plan, finalize, or implement regulations establishing a vessel traffic safety fairway which is less than 5 miles wide between the Santa Barbara vessel traffic separation scheme and the San Francisco vessel traffic separation scheme. This language has been included in previous appropriations bills. OTHER Mackinaw .--The bill includes funding for continued operation and maintenance of the icebreaking cutter Mackinaw during fiscal year 1999. Drug interdiction activities .--The Committee has provided the requested $369,000,000 for the war on drugs. It should be left to the Commandant's discretion how the drug interdiction activities funding is to be distributed; however, the Committee believes that this area is perfectly suited for application of performance measures and evaluation of program impacts. Global marine distress signal system [GMDSS] .--The Committee is concerned with potential problems with the implementation of the global marine distress signal system [GMDSS]. The Federal Communications Commission [FCC] has adopted regulations that will require GMDSS units to be installed on all vessels, including fishing vessels, over 300 tons. This is intended to replace ship-to-ship emergency communications with an automated ship-to-shore system. Several problems exist with the GMDSS concept as it would be applied. One of the most serious problems would be that vessels carrying GMDSS equipment would no longer be required to monitor other communications channels including those most frequently used by fishing vessels. Most successful rescues are performed by other nearby commercial vessels, and under this new regime, the distressed vessel would have to rely on the Coast Guard to direct nearby vessels to the incident site. This will cause an unnecessary delay in response and could substantially degrade current levels of safety. Other potential problems include: (1) whether new shore-based stations will provide adequate listening coverage for all parts of the Bering Sea; (2) cost per vessel of installing the new equipment; (3) lack of adequate training for system operators; and (4) whether manufacturers of GMDSS equipment are capable of supplying the number of units that will be required by February 1, 1999. The Committee directs the Commandant to ensure that the Coast Guard's mission to ensure the safety of life at sea is not compromised by the new GMDSS requirements and to report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations on what actions, if any, are necessary to provide this assurance. Marine Fire and Safety Association .--The Committee remains supportive of efforts by the Marine Fire and Safety Association [MFSA] to provide specialized firefighting training and maintain an oilspill response contingency plan for the Columbia River. The Committee encourages the Secretary to provide funding for MFSA consistent with the authorization and directs the Secretary to provide $178,000 to continue efforts by the nonprofit organization comprised of numerous fire departments on both sides of the Columbia River. The funding will be utilized to provide specialized communications, firefighting training and equipment, and to implement the oilspill response contingency plan for the Columbia River. Seasonal rescue capability. --The Committee remains concerned about maintaining critically important Coast Guard air rescue response time in the New York City area during the peak boating season. Therefore, the Committee directs the Coast Guard to establish and operate a seasonal air facility in the New York City area to provide helicopter rescue capability during the period April 15 through October 15. Container Inspection Program. --The Committee recommended funding level includes $1,191,000 for the restoration of the Container Inspection Program. The Committee rejects the request to downsize the Coast Guard container inspection work force and has provided sufficient funds to maintain the inspector work force at the fiscal year 1998 level. Testimony by the Commandant before the Committee indicates that, while the Coast Guard proposal is presented as a reduction solely to the container inspector work force, the actual effect of the reduction would be to cut personnel who are devoting a majority of their time to other critical marine safety functions at the direction of the captain of the port. As such, the proposed reduction, rather than serving to reduce only container inspections, would effectively reduce numerous other critical marine safety activities. These activities include the inspection of tankships and waterfront facilities handling crude oil, petroleum products and hazardous materials for compliance with safety and pollution prevention regulations; the inspection of foreign flag vessels under the Port State Control Program for protection of U.S. ports and harbors from the hazards posed by poorly maintained and unseaworthy vessels; the timely response to pollution incidents and oversight of pollution cleanup activities; and the performance of periodic shoreside and waterborne harbor patrols for law enforcement, port risk assessment and identification of potential safety hazards. The Committee continues to view the Container Inspection Program as a critical marine safety task and an important component of the Coast Guard's port safety mission, especially in light of the continued growth in containerized cargo entering U.S. ports. Ballast water management program .--The Committee recommended funding level includes $2,000,000 to implement the nationwide ballast water management program. USCG Station Rockaway, NY .--The Committee directs the Coast Guard to provide, on a quarterly basis, a report to the Appropriations Committees on the status of a readiness and manpower capability of the Rockaway, NY, U.S. Coast Guard Station. Secretary's discretionary transfer authority .--The bill includes language that permits the Secretary to transfer up to $60,000,000 from Federal Aviation Administration operations to Coast Guard operating expenses for the purpose of providing additional funds for drug interdiction activities. User fees .--The bill includes language that prohibits the planning, finalization, or implementation of any regulation that would promulgate new maritime user fees not specifically authorized by law after the date of enactment of this act. ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS General Trust Total Appropriations, 1998\1\ $377,850,000 $20,000,000 $397,850,000 Budget estimate, 1999\2\ 422,773,000 20,000,000 442,773,000 Committee recommendation 366,093,000 20,000,000 388,693,000 \1\Includes $9,000,000 in asset sales. \2\Includes $1,000,000 in asset sales and $35,000,000 in proposed navigation assistance fees. This appropriation provides for the major acquisition, construction, and improvement of vessels, aircraft, shore units, and aids to navigation operated and maintained by the Coast Guard. Currently, the Coast Guard has in operation approximately 250 cutters, ranging in size from 65-foot tugs to 399-foot polar icebreakers, more than 2,000 boats, and an inventory of more than 200 helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft. The Coast Guard also operates approximately 600 stations, support and supply centers, communications facilities, and other shore units. The Coast Guard provides over 48,000 navigational aids--buoys, fixed aids, lighthouses, and radio navigational stations. COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION The following table summarizes the Committee's programmatic recommendations: [In thousands of dollars] Fiscal year 1998 enacted\1\ Fiscal year 1999 estimate\2\ Committee recommendation Vessels 212,100 269,573 215,473 Aircraft 25,800 37,131 46,131 Other equipment 44,650 33,969 35,389 Shore facilities and aids to navigation 68,300 53,650 43,250 Personnel and related support 47,000 48,450 48,450 ----------------------------- ------------------------------ -------------------------- Total 397,850 442,773 388,693 \1\Includes $9,000,000 in asset sales. \2\Includes $1,000,000 in asset sales and $35,000,000 in proposed navigation assistance fees. VESSELS The Committee recommends $215,473,000 for vessel acquisition and improvement. The projected allocation of these funds is shown in the table below: VESSELS [In thousands of dollars] Fiscal year 1999 estimate Committee recommendation Acquire vessels and equipment: 105,000 45,000 Stern loading buoy boat replacement 11,773 11,773 Survey and design--cutters and boats 500 500 Mackinaw replacement 4,000 ATS 1 conversion 10,000 14,000 Surface search radar replacement project 12,900 12,900 Deepwater capability replacement 28,000 28,000 Repair, renovate, or improve existing vessels and small boats: 3,800 3,800 --------------------------- -------------------------- Total (new program level) 269,573 215,473 Seagoing buoy tender [WLB] replacement .--The Coast Guard is in the process of replacing its 50-year-old fleet of seagoing buoy tenders with up to 16 new tenders. The request of $105,000,000 for fiscal year 1999 is to pay for the award of two ships under the full production contract, and to cover additional costs such as spare parts, logistics, and project administration. According to recent estimates, the contract for the first two production ships will be awarded no earlier than the fourth quarter of fiscal year 1998. The Committee continues to be concerned about the growing carryover balances in this program. Last year, the Committee maintained the funding in this account pursuant to the belief that the Coast Guard would be able to obligate a substantial portion of the funds. To date, that has not happened. In addition, this program is of concern to the Committee due to the increasing program administration costs, the vacillating sail-away costs, and the current unobligated balance. The Coast Guard estimates that the third and fourth vessels in the procurement cost a total of $65,000,000. The current request for two vessels under the anticipated full production procurement contract is $105,000,000. The cost escalation of this vessel procurement is of great concern to the Committee, and accordingly, the Committee recommends a reduction of $60,000,000 to the request. When combined with the unobligated balances, the program funding level should be sufficient to award a contract for two vessels at the average cost of the initial procurement assuming the cost profiles for the procurement remain stable for more than a couple of months. The Committee understands that the contract is structured for a minimum of two ships in fiscal year 1999. The Committee's intent is to provide sufficient funds for the Coast Guard to contract for the two vessels at a reasonable price and, at the same time, clear any unobligated balances associated with the program. The Coast Guard shall provide an analysis of the proposed procurement to the Committee prior to the obligation of these funds including an estimate of the cost of the complete procurement to fill the requirement for seagoing buoy tenders. Coastal buoy tender [WLM] replacement .--The Committee has provided $31,000,000 for the coastal buoy tender replacement program. This program replaces the Coast Guard's existing 133-foot and 157-foot coastal buoy tenders with 14 new ships. The Coast Guard's request of $31,000,000 for fiscal year 1999 is for economic price adjustments, change orders, logistics, and administration. All 14 ships have been ordered. Coastal patrol boat/82-foot WPB replacement .--The Committee has provided $37,600,000 for the coastal patrol boat replacement program. This program would replace the 82-foot coastal patrol boats which are over 30 years old. The $37,600,000 request for fiscal year 1999 was to procure eight new boats. The Committee had hoped to procure additional CPB's by exercising existing options to provide the Coast Guard increased flexibility in asset deployment at an earlier date than under the current procurement schedule, but budgetary constraints make that impracticable at this time. The CPB is one of the more versatile vessels in the Coast Guard inventory and should provide increased flexibility and capability as the Coast Guard transitions from the current fleet mix and recapitalizes the fleet. Stern loading buoy boat replacement project .--The Committee recommendation provides the entire Coast Guard request of $11,773,000 in fiscal year 1999 to procure eight new buoy boats. Mackinaw replacement .--The Committee recommends $4,000,000 for concept exploration to refine the specifications and costs for a heavy icebreaking replacement vessel, including a new multimission vessel, for the 53-year-old Mackinaw . While the Committee is pleased that the Coast Guard committed to the continued operation of the Mackinaw to maintain heavy icebreaking capabilities on the Great Lakes, the Committee is concerned about the long lead time projected by the Coast Guard to receive a replacement vessel when the Coast Guard has been studying this issue for a number of years, and projects that a replacement vehicle would not be available until the year 2006. The funding provided in the bill will prevent another year's delay in the acquisition process for a replacement heavy icebreaking vessel. The Committee expects the Coast Guard to issue an interim status report on the concept exploration to the Committee by January 31, 1999. ATS 1 conversion .--The Committee recommends $14,000,000 for conversion and the addition of a flight deck. Deepwater capability replacement.-- The Committee has provided $28,000,000 consistent with the budget request. The Committee is concerned with the aggressive and novel approach envisioned by the Coast Guard in the deepwater capability study and procurement and notes that the Coast Guard and the Department have a history of difficulty with large complex procurements or asset modifications. The deepwater procurement promises to be the most complex and potentially controversial of procurements that the Coast Guard has managed. Accordingly, the Committee directs the Coast Guard to report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations, the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, and the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee prior to the downselection concerning the anticipated number of project teams, the anticipated role of the Government team, and the anticipated schedule for final contract award. The Committee encourages the Department and the Coast Guard to structure the procurement to provide the greatest possible flexibility for the procurement, cost competitiveness, and diversity of approach for meeting the deepwater mission requirements. The Committee is concerned about the inclusion of a Presidential advisory council on Coast Guard roles and missions as part of the Deepwater capability replacement analysis justification. The justification indicated that the council would convene in early 1998, but as of June 10, 1998, the Committee had not been made aware of the formulation of such a council, much less any meetings. Before any funds are committed to initiate such a roles and mission review council, the Committee expects to be briefed on the expected composition of any such proposed council, the charter for any such council, and the anticipated timetable for completion of such a review. The Committee is concerned that too much time has elapsed in fiscal year 1998 for the initiation of such a review to have any meaningful contribution to the fiscal year 1999 appropriations process and accordingly, directs that funding for such a review council be requested in the fiscal year 2000 budget submission. Polar class icebreaker reliability improvement project [RIP]. --The Comittee recommends $4,000,000 for this project and reiterates the cost overrun and project management concerns noted in the fiscal year 1998 conference report. AIRCRAFT For aircraft procurement, the Committee recommends $46,131,000. Funds for aircraft acquisitions are distributed as follows: AIRCRAFT [In thousands of dollars] Fiscal year 1999 estimate Committee recommendation HC 130 engine upgrade 9,941 9,941 HH 65A helicopter kapton rewiring 4,500 4,500 HH 65A engine control program 9,000 Long range search aircraft capability preservation 1,590 1,590 HH 65A helicopter mission unit computer unit replacement 3,000 3,000 HC 130 aircraft sensor upgrade 11,000 11,000 HU 25 aircraft avionics improvements 3,500 3,500 HH 60J navigation upgrade 1,100 1,100 HC 130 side looking airborne radar [SLAR] 2,500 2,500 --------------------------- -------------------------- Total 37,131 46,131 HH 65A performance limitations. --The Committee understands that there are a large number of mission situations where the combination of current mission weight requirements, fuel load, temperature, altitude, and sea state must be traded off with mission range, on-station time, and shipboard operations. A full authority digital electronic control [FADEC] engine control program, currently anticipated as a life cycle cost reduction and safety initiative in fiscal year 2000, is an essential initial step to restoring power margins on the HH 65. The Committee recommends $9,000,000 to initiate the FADEC program a year early and to initiate any associated engine upgrade engineering efforts required to facilitate a cost-effective power upgrade program. The Committee further requests the Coast Guard to provide a description of the limitations and tradeoffs mentioned above, with relevant measures of how frequently power limitations restrict the HH 65 below original Coast Guard requirements and the impact of such limitations. Further, the Committee requests the Coast Guard to provide a plan to restore needed power margins while accommodating past and future weight growth over the second half of the HH 65's useful life. Please provide this report by March 1, 1999. OTHER EQUIPMENT The Committee recommends $35,389,000. The following table displays the project allocations: OTHER EQUIPMENT [In thousands of dollars] Fiscal year 1999 estimate Committee recommendation Fleet logistics system [FLS] 4,669 4,669 Ports and waterways safety system [PAWSS] 6,600 5,500 Marine information for safety and law enforcement [MISLE] 6,100 4,000 Local notices to mariners [LNM] automation 1,300 1,000 Defense message system [DMS] impementation 800 800 Communication system [COMMSYS] 2000 2,000 1,000 Differential global positioning system [DGPS] 2,600 9,520 Personnel management information system/joint uniform military pay system II 1,900 1,900 Aviation logistics management information system [ALMIS] 1,000 1,000 National distress system modernization 3,000 2,000 Commercial satellite communication upgrade 4,000 4,000 --------------------------- -------------------------- Total 33,969 35,389 Ports and waterways safety system [PAWSS] .--The Committee recommends $5,500,000 for the development and implementation of a new ports and waterways safety system [PAWSS], the same level appropriated for fiscal year 1998. The Committee continues to be interested in Coast Guard activities to develop a new approach to navigation safety, with an emphasis on streamlining and reducing the cost of such safety systems. The Committee applauds the Coast Guard's efforts to develop such a system in cooperation with the maritime community and to apply information technology. Marine information for safety and law enforcement [MISLE]. --The Committee recommends $4,000,000 for this activity, the same level appropriated for fiscal year 1998. Local notices to mariners [LNM] automation .--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for this activity, the same level appropriated for fiscal year 1998. Communications system [COMMSYS] 2000 .--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for this activity, the same level appropriated for fiscal year 1998. Nationwide differential GPS .--The Committee recommends $9,520,000 for this activity, $6,920,000 more than requested. The Committee directs the Coast Guard to use the additional funds provided to accelerate the Coast Guard's electronic equipment procurement, site preparation and construction work, and installation of conversion software at 33 Air Force groundwave emergency network [GWEN] transmitter sites, in order to convert these sites as quickly as possible to differential global positioning system transmitter sites. The Committee is convinced that the most reasonable way to proceed with the Department of Transportation's Nationwide Differential Global Positioning System [NDGPS] Program is to establish the DGPS transmitters in the fastest, most cost-effective manner possible. The Committee also understands that the Air Force may release the GWEN system in approximately 1 year, and economies of scale can be realized by accelerating the program at this point beyond the requested funding level. The Committee did not include NDGPS funds requested in either the Federal Highway Administration or within the Federal Railroad Administration budgets, but is supportive of the NDGPS effort, and wants to see the program carried out in a expeditious and logical manner. The funds provided will pay for the costs associated with converting a minimum of 33 GWEN sites that are currently in the optimal location for NDGPS service, and for the personnel costs associated with four installers. Personnel management information system .--The Committee has provided the full amount requested. National distress system modernization .--The Committee recommends a reduction of $1,000,000 below the requested level to $2,000,000. The Committee believes the Coast Guard can complete the activities anticipated for fiscal year 1999 in this program within the reduced funding level. SHORE FACILITIES AND AIDS TO NAVIGATION The program level recommended is $43,250,000. SHORE FACILITIES AND AIDS TO NAVIGATION [In thousands of dollars] Fiscal year 1999 estimate Committee recommendation Shore--General: 5,000 5,000 Shore--Air stations: 1,500 1,500 Shore--Centers/groups/stations: 1,450 1,450 Aids to navigation facilities: Waterways aids-to-navigation projects 5,000 5,000 --------------------------- -------------------------- Total 53,650 43,250 Minor AC&I shore construction projects .--The recommended funding level includes funding for the Thatcher's Island, MA, boat launchway. Coast Guard housing. --The Committee recommends the Coast Guard reprogram prior unobligated balances in this account. The Department of Transportation inspector general has reported that there are in excess of $16,000,000 in projects that cannot be obligated. Station Dauphin Island. --The Committee recommends $3,200,000 for improvements to Station Dauphin Island. The improvements will permit the Coast Guard to station assets almost an hour closer to the most heavily utilized boating and fishing areas. PERSONNEL AND RELATED SUPPORT The program level recommended is $48,450,000. Within the amount provided, $750,000 shall be for core acquisition costs. The Committee has provided the full amount requested for AC&I personnel and related support. [In thousands of dollars] Personnel and related support Fiscal year 1999 estimate Committee recommendation Direct personnel costs 47,700 47,700 Core acquisition costs 750 750 --------------------------- -------------------------- Total 48,450 48,450 BILL LANGUAGE Asset sales .--The bill includes a provision which would credit the proceeds from the sale or lease of surplus Coast Guard real property to this appropriation. The administration requested this authority which allows asset sale revenues to be credited to this appropriation as offsetting collections, but limits the amount of offsetting collections in fiscal year 1999 to $1,000,000. Any excess proceeds from asset sales would accrue to the following fiscal year. The Committee would like the Coast Guard's estimate of properties of high value in the Coast Guard's real property portfolio; therefore, the Coast Guard is directed to submit to the Committee by March 1, 1999, an updated list of its 25 most valuable properties. This list should include information on the fair market value of each property (or an estimate thereof), the amount of land and the number of buildings, the current use being made of the property, and the annual operating costs for the activities housed on each property. The Coast Guard needs funding it can depend upon to carry out necessary projects. The Senate supports the authority vested in the Commandant which allows the sale of real property and specified operational assets, with proceeds to be credited to the ``Acquisition, construction, and improvements'' appropriation. The Coast Guard and FAA, like many other agencies, are reorganizing and downsizing while providing critical services to the public at less cost. The Committee believes that the Coast Guard, the FAA, the FHWA, and the Government as a whole, would benefit substantially if allowed budgetary credit for property they expect to excess as part of downsizing efforts. Clearly, there is the potential for a very positive benefit if the Coast Guard and the FAA are permitted to receive credit for the value of excessed property. Pier space use agreement .--The bill includes language that allows the Secretary of Transportation, acting through the Commandant of the Coast Guard, to enter into a long-term use agreement with the city of Homer for dedicated pier space on the municipal dock. This authority is necessary to support Coast Guard vessels when such vessels call on Homer, AK. The terms and conditions of the use agreement shall be developed by the Secretary and the city of Homer. ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE AND RESTORATION Appropriations, 1998 $21,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 21,000,000 Committee recommendation 21,000,000 The Committee recommends funding of $21,000,000 to continue the environmental restoration and compliance-related actions throughout the Coast Guard. These fiscal year 1999 funds will be used to address environmental problems at former and current Coast Guard units as required by applicable Federal, State, and local environmental laws and regulations. Planned expenditures for these funds include major upgrades to petroleum and regulated-substance storage tanks, restoration of contaminated ground water and soils, remediation efforts at hazardous substance disposal sites, and initial site surveys and actions necessary to bring Coast Guard shore facilities and vessels into compliance with environmental laws and regulations. ALTERATION OF BRIDGES (highway trust fund) Appropriations, 1998 $17,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 (\1\) Committee recommendation (highway trust fund) 20,000,000 \1\The budget estimate proposes that the cost of altering bridges will become eligible for funding from Federal-aid highways. The ``Alteration of bridges'' appropriation provides funds for the Coast Guard's share of the cost of altering or removing bridges obstructive to navigation. Under the provisions of the Truman-Hobbs Act of June 21, 1940, as amended (33 U.S.C. 511 et seq.), the Coast Guard, as the Federal Government's agent, is required to share with owners the cost of altering railroad and publicly owned highway bridges which obstruct the free movement of navigation on navigable waters of the United States in accordance with the formula established in 33 U.S.C. 516. The Committee directs that, of the funds provided, $3,000,000 shall be allocated to the Florida Avenue railroad/highway combination bridge in New Orleans, LA; $7,000,000 to the Sidney Lanier highway bridge in Brunswick, GA; $2,000,000 to the John F. Limehouse Bridge in Charleston, SC; $1,000,000 to the Chelsea Street Bridge in Boston, MA; $5,000,000 to the highway 90 bridge in Pascagoula, MS; and $2,000,000 to the Mississippi River bridge in Greenville, MS. RETIRED PAY Appropriations, 1998 (mandatory) $653,196,000 Budget estimate, 1999 (mandatory) 684,000,000 Committee recommendation (mandatory) 684,000,000 The ``Retired pay'' appropriation provides for retired pay of military personnel of the Coast Guard and Coast Guard Reserve, members of the former Lighthouse Service, and for annuities payable to beneficiaries of retired military personnel under the retired serviceman's family protection plan (10 U.S.C. 1431 1446) and survivor benefit plan (10 U.S.C. 1447 1455), and for medical care of retired personnel and their dependents under the Dependents Medical Care Act. The average number of personnel on the retired rolls is estimated to be 32,633 in fiscal year 1999, as compared with an estimated 31,462 in fiscal year 1998 and 30,478 in fiscal year 1997. The budget estimate proposed indefinite budget authority instead of a fixed amount. RESERVE TRAINING Appropriations, 1998 $67,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 67,000,000 Committee recommendation 67,000,000 Under the provisions of 14 U.S.C. 145, the Secretary of Transportation is required to adequately support the development and training of a Reserve force to ensure that the Coast Guard will be sufficiently organized, manned, and equipped to fully perform its wartime missions. The purpose of the Reserve training program is to provide trained units and qualified persons for active duty in the Coast Guard in time of war or national emergency, or at such other times as the national security requires. Coast Guard reservists must also train for mobilization assignments that are unique to the Coast Guard in times of war, such as port security operations associated with the Coast Guard's Maritime Defense Zone [MDZ] mission and include deployable port security units. The Coast Guard is provided Reserve training funding as follows: [In thousands of dollars] Functional program element Fiscal year 1998 levels President's request (7,600 SELRES) Committee recommendation (8,000 SELRES) Initial training 3,341 2,466 2,466 Continuing training 39,827 40,820 40,820 Operation and maintenance support 15,074 15,374 15,374 Program management and administration 8,758 8,340 8,340 ------------------------- ------------------------------------ ----------------------------------------- Total 67,000 67,000 67,000 RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION General Trust Total Appropriations, 1998 $15,500,000 $3,500,000 $19,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 14,800,000 3,500,000 18,300,000 Committee recommendation 13,961,000 3,500,000 17,461,000 The Coast Guard's Research and Development Program seeks to improve the tools and techniques with which Coast Guard carries out its varied operational missions and to increase the knowledge base upon which it depends to fulfill its regulatory responsibilities. The Committee recommendation includes $17,461,000 for research, development, test, and evaluation distributed as follows: [In thousands of dollars] Fiscal year 1998 Fiscal year 1999 estimate Committee recommendation Program areas: 1,875 1,250 1,250 ------------------ --------------------------- -------------------------- Total 19,000 18,300 17,461 \1\Project areas discussed in the servicewide safety and environmental compliance; command, control, communication, computers, and intelligence integration; and technology advancement and assessment budget in the fiscal year 1998 request have been consolidated into a single budget sheet (technology investment) for the fiscal year 1999 budget submission. The Committee has provided $17,461,000 for fiscal year 1999 research and development. Waterways safety and management. --The Committee recommends $1,225,000 for this activity, the same level appropriated in fiscal year 1998. Marine safety. --The Committee recommends $2,995,000 for this activity, the same level appropriated in fiscal year 1998. Marine environmental protection. --The Committee recommends $2,704,000 for this activity, including $1,000,000 for further invasive species research efforts. Within the funds provided, the Coast Guard is directed to provide an assessment of the applicability of previously developed antisubmarine acoustic-monitoring technology for application in the identification and capture of drug traffickers in high volume maritime transit zones. BOAT SAFETY (aquatic resources trust fund) Appropriations, 1998 $35,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999\1\ ........................... Committee recommendation ........................... \1\President's budget requests $55,000,000 in mandatory appropriations in fiscal year 1999. This account provides financial assistance for a coordinated National Recreational Boating Safety Program for the several States. Title 46, United States Code, section 13106, establishes a ``Boat safety'' account from which the Secretary may allocate and distribute matching funds to assist in the development, administration, and financing of qualifying State programs. The ``Boat safety'' account consists of amounts transferred from the highway trust fund which are derived from the motorboat fuel tax (18.4 cents per gallon). The President's budget requests no discretionary funding for 1999. Instead, the President's budget proposes to provide all funding for the State boating safety grant program by providing $55,000,000 from the aquatic resources trust fund. The Transportation Efficiency Act for the 21st Century provides for a guaranteed funding level of $55,000,000 annually for this program. No additional appropriations are necessary for fiscal year 1999. General Provisions Land conveyance, Coast Guard Station Ocracoke. --The Committee has included language section 334 permitting the transfer of Coast Guard Station Ocracoke to the State of North Carolina. Transportation of edible oils .--The Committee has included a general provision (sec. 341) that requires the Secretary of Transportation to promulgate a regulation not later than March 31, 1999, that is consistent with the Edible Oil Regulatory Reform Act, to specifically address facilities that handle animal fats and vegetable oils by amending 33 CFR part 154, which relates to response plans for marine-transportation related facilities. To be consistent, a rule for animal fats and for vegetable oils should include, at a minimum, separate definitions, a separate category from other oils, and provide requirements that are specific to and appropriate for animal fats and vegetable oils. FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION SUMMARY OF FISCAL YEAR 1999 PROGRAM The Federal Aviation Administration traces its origins to the Air Commerce Act of 1926, but more recently to the Federal Aviation Act of 1958 which established the independent Federal Aviation Agency from functions which had resided in the Airways Modernization Board, the Civil Aeronautics Administration, and parts of the Civil Aeronautics Board. FAA became an administration of the Department of Transportation on April 1, 1967, pursuant to the Department of Transportation Act (October 15, 1966). The total recommended program level for the FAA for fiscal year 1999 amounts to $9,899,569,269 including $43,000,000 in user fees credited to the ``Operations'' appropriation and a $2,100,000,000 obligation limitation on the use of contract authority for the Airport Grants Program. The following table summarizes the Committee's recommendations: [In thousands of dollars] Program Fiscal year-- Committee recommendation 1998 enacted 1999 budget estimate Operations \1\5,335,934 5,631,130 5,581,259 Facilities and equipment \2\1,875,477 2,130,000 2,044,683 Research, engineering, and development 199,183 290,000 173,627 Grants-in-aid for airports 1,700,000 1,700,000 2,100,000 -------------- ---------------------- ----------- Total 9,110,594 9,751,130 9,899,569 \1\Excludes reduction for TASC pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66; excludes transfer of $1,554,000 from Department of State pursuant to Public Law 105 119. \2\Excludes $25,000,000 supplemental Public Law 105 174. OPERATIONS General Trust User fees Total Appropriations, 1998\1\ $3,400,306,000 $1,901,628,000 $5,301,934,000 Budget estimate, 1999 3,528,130,000 2,060,000,000 $43,000,000 5,631,130,000 Committee recommendation 3,379,328,885 2,158,930,135 43,000,000 5,581,259,000 \1\Excludes reduction of $939,000 for TASC pursuant to Public Law 105 66; excludes transfer of $1,554,000 from Department of State pursuant to Public Law 105 119; includes $50,000,000 transferred to EAS Program. FAA's ``Operations'' appropriation provides funds for the operation, maintenance, communications, and logistic support of the air traffic control and navigation systems and activities. It also covers the administration and management of the regulatory, airports, commercial space, medical and engineering, and development programs. User fees. --The administration proposed collecting $93,000,000 in user fees in fiscal year 1999. These fees were to be available without Appropriations Committee action, including $50,000,000 for the essential air service program and rural airport safety and $43,000,000 for FAA expenses. The FAA cost allocation methodology, which the U.S. Court of Appeals cited as a critical deficiency in the court's decision to invalidate the schedule of overflight user fees, is scheduled to be operative during July 1998. Accordingly, the FAA has not appealed the court of appeals decision and the Committee assumes that FAA intends to reissue a fee schedule that comports with the court of appeals decision. The Committee further assumes that the FAA will adhere to prior congressional guidance as a new schedule of fees is formulated. Operations.-- The activities of the operations accounts comprise eight main areas consistent with FAA's reorganization to bring together functions and activities that support the provision of a single, major service and to establish a single executive responsible for that service. Air traffic services. --Provides for the operations and maintenance of the national air traffic control and navigation system and the installation of air traffic and navigation equipment. Air traffic services consists of five subactivities: air traffic, NAS logistics, systems maintenance, leased telecommunications, and flight inspections. Aviation regulation and certification.-- Promotes aviation safety and ensures compliance with safety and certification standards for air carriers, commercial operators, air agencies, airmen, and civil aircraft, including aircraft registration; develops and administers safety standards for airworthiness of aircraft and components. Includes accident investigation, aviation medicine, aviation rulemaking, and the suspected unapproved parts office. Aviation security .--Provides for the overall planning, direction, management, evaluation, and enforcement of civil aviation security; supports efforts covering the investigation and interdiction of illegal drugs and the assessment of foreign airports. Research and acquisition.-- Responsible for all research, prototyping, system development, and acquisition activities. Includes the William J. Hughes Technical Center. Administration of airports. --Provides for the administration of airport grants and the safety inspection and certification of the Nation's airports. Commercial space transportation. --Facilitates and promotes commercial space launches by the U.S. private sector and licenses and regulates commercial launches, launch site operations, and certain payloads. Administration. --Funds the administrative functions that establish policy and direct and develop programs in the areas of FAA aircraft use and management, building space management, budget and accounting, business information and consultation, human resource management, and technical and management training; includes the regional administrators and the Aeronautical Center Director. Staff offices. --Funds the Office of the Administrator and the Deputy Administrator, and offices that report directly to the Administrator and provide executive direction; operations and communications control; civil rights; government and industry affairs; policy, planning, and international aviation; legal counsel; and public affairs. The bill includes $5,538,259,000 for the operations activities of the Federal Aviation Administration, of which $2,158,930,135 shall be derived from the airport and airway trust fund. As in past years, FAA is directed to report immediately to the Committees on Appropriations in the event resources are insufficient to operate a safe and effective air traffic control system. The following table summarizes the Committee's recommendation in comparison to the budget estimate: [In thousands of dollars] Fiscal year-- Committee recommendations 1998 program level\1\\2\ 1999 budget estimate Air traffic services 4,153,106 4,380,866 4,325,866 Aviation regulation and certification 609,879 636,027 624,879 Aviation security 97,479 128,821 111,429 Research and acquisition 92,340 94,202 92,340 Administration of airports 47,891 49,854 47,891 Commercial space transportation 6,168 6,275 6,168 Administration 256,493 259,014 256,493 Staff offices 73,193 76,071 73,193 Accountwide adjustments ----------- -------------------------- ----------------------- Total 5,336,549 5,631,130 5,538,259 ========================== ======================= =========== User fees 84,000 43,000 43,000 Appropriated funds 5,252,549 5,588,130 5,538,259 Secretary's discretionary transfer authority 60,000 -------------------------- ----------------------- ----------- Total available funds 5,252,549 5,631,130 5,641,259 \1\Includes $939,000 reduction for TASC pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66. Includes $1,554,000 transfer from Department of State pursuant to Public Law 105 119. \2\Excludes $23,000,000 available balances of the $57,700,000 provided in the Omnibus Consolidated Appropriations Act of 1997, Public Law 104 208. AIR TRAFFIC SERVICES The Committee recommends a total of $4,325,866,000 for the operation and maintenance of the national air traffic control and flight service system. The Committee is confident that this level is completely sufficient for air traffic services and offers the following analysis for illustration of the flexibility represented by the Committee's recommendation. The requirements for funding for this activity could be predicated on a series of adjustments to the fiscal year 1998 appropriated level. Initially, the appropriation could be adjusted downward for the $93,000,000 in overflight fees that were not forthcoming in fiscal year 1998 but are anticipated for fiscal year 1999. The Administrator and the Secretary have both indicated that the FAA has been able to maintain a safe air traffic control environment notwithstanding the inability to access the revenues that would have come from these fees. Second, the appropriation should be reduced by $10,994,000 requested for WAAS operations activities consistent with the treatment of the WAAS Program in the F&E account. In addition, over $23,000,000 in this appropriation is directly attributable to 248 controller staff-years that are solely committed to union activities and over $15,000,000 that is directly attributable to overtime staffing. For a great deal of the amount of time overtime is authorized, a union controller representative is also scheduled--but only for union activities. Given the high level of staff-years committed to union activities viewed in conjunction with the seemingly unalterable trend for substantial reliance on overtime staffing, the Committee encourages the Federal Aviation Administration to pursue greater flexibility in staffing arrangements to reduce the current reliance on overtime and to encourage the conduct of union activities in nonpeak air traffic control periods. It does not seem unreasonable to the Committee that union activities might be best conducted during the slower traffic period and that union representatives might best serve the union membership by conducting union activities while the bulk of the controllers (and presumably the union representatives as well) are not engaged in the heavier traffic flows. While the Committee does not recommend reducing the appropriation by the amount attributable to the overtime staffing and the seemingly suboptimal timing of the generous allotment of staff-years for union activities, or interim incentive pay, or even adjusting the base to reflect the actual fiscal year 1998 baseline, the FAA should pursue efficiencies that would result from a greater coordination of activities in this area. Further, the Committee notes that the FAA forecasting of aviation activity has tended to be overly optimistic. In the Independent Financial Assessment, Coopers & Lybrand noted: The FAA has a solid reputation in the aviation community for its forecasting abilities. However, when comparing actual past activity to 5-year historical projections, the FAA has consistently overestimated future aviation activity. Five-year projections are of particular importance in assessing the FAA's financial requirements as it takes 3 to 5 years to fully train a new controller. Overestimates in the need for new controllers 5 years from now will likely lead to significant future expenditures for unnecessary resources. It is also important because the Federal budget process begins at least 2\1/2\ years before the end of the particular fiscal year. Interviews with FAA staff have indicated that these long-term overestimations are principally caused by the economic projections provided by OMB, as these projections generally do not take economic cycles into account. OMB's projections are used as the basis for the FAA's own forecasting. Compared with the limited number of other aviation forecasts, the FAA commercial airline forecasts are not overly optimistic. However, it should be noted that all of the aviation forecasters we identified had a natural interest in optimistic forecasts. Some industry observers have even suggested that the recent phenomenal growth in commercial air carrier activity has peaked. General aviation is likely to be overestimated. The FAA has forecasted general aviation to grow by approximately 7 percent from 1997 to 2002. Although recent statistics have suggested that the decline in general aviation activity may have ended, it is unlikely that general aviation can sustain such a high future growth rate as projected. A key indicator suggested by user groups is that the number of general aviation pilots, which has decreased by 25 percent from 1980 to 1996, and is expected to continue to decline. Since general aviation accounts for 60 percent of total U.S. civil airborne hours, such an overestimation will have a significant impact on actual future FAA workloads. Absolute aggregate error averages from 1990 to 1996 of 8.9 percent and 7.7 percent for 5-year RPM and ARTCC operation forecasts respectively indicate that FAA forecasting calculations have been historically overestimated. The impact of these estimates on overall FAA financial requirements depends how closely linked demand is to staffing standards. Air traffic control operation costs continue to increase faster than demand for FAA air traffic control services. The high likelihood that future FAA workloads are overestimated needs to be among the factors considered when estimating future controller staffing needs. In addition, the Coopers & Lybrand assessment implies the possibility for the FAA to increase the efficiency of the air traffic control work force. Some of those possible efficiencies are mentioned above. Further, the average annual growth in operations at air traffic control towers, en route centers, and flight service stations from 1992 to 1997 has been 0.05 percent, 2.13 percent, and -0.55 percent, respectively. Current average operations per hour at en route centers are less than 3 per controller hour, and current average operations per hour at air traffic control towers is less than 6 per controller hour. Those averages would seem to indicate that there is some room for improvement in controller efficiency or staffing coordination. The Committee also notes the recent completion of the labor negotiations between the FAA and the National Air Traffic Controllers Association. The Committee believes that careful management of the funds provided in this act will ensure sufficient resources are available to cover the substantial salary increases contained in the agreement. Training .--Pursuant to the recent concerns expressed by the Federal Aviation Administration about the need for retraining of air traffic controllers, the Committee is confident that any training or retraining initiatives can be accommodated within the recommended level. The Committee directs the Administrator to report to the Committee by August 1, 1998, on the following items: (1) the circumstances that led to the decision that retraining of air traffic controllers was necessary; (2) how the incident emerged within the Federal Aviation Administration; (3) the steps taken to both retrain controllers and to insure that deficiencies in the air traffic control system are surfaced immediately and brought to the attention of senior Federal Aviation Administration officials; (4) the anticipated training program for both fiscal years 1998 and 1999. The Committee notes that the FAA has consistently underfunded controller training as compared to the request over the past several years. The Committee encourages the FAA to commit the requested $23,000,000 for training to training and not to allocate those funds to other activities. If the pattern of the past several years continues of diverting training funds for other purposes, additional measures may be taken to insure that critical training activities are not underfunded. As the Federal Aviation Administration reviews its training requirements, the Committee anticipates the establishment, from amounts provided for training, of a university-based center for training, as well as academics and research, that would design and deliver technology-based distance education and training courses to meet the needs and requirements of the Federal Aviation Administration and the general aviation community. Such a center should be designed to address immediate and time-sensitive issues, such as the situation that led to the current decision to retrain controllers, as well as issues in flight standards, aviations safety, human factors, and cabin crew issues. The Committee recommends that such a center be located at an institution which currently possesses the pertinent technology and which has experience with the FAA in training, research, and distance education. Emergency services training .--The Committee recommendation includes $1,500,000 for specialized aircraft firefighting training for Federal and non-Federal emergency personnel, at the Rocky Mountain Emergency Services Training Center in Helena, MT. Contract tower program .--The Committee recommendation includes $6,000,000 for a contract tower cost-sharing program. These funds are in addition to those provided for the regular contract tower program. The Committee notes that the Department of Transportation's Inspector General has found that the contract tower program has provided level I air traffic control services at a lower cost for 110 towers previously operated by the FAA and provided air traffic control services at 50 towers the FAA could not have afforded to staff. The new program allows those towers that fall below the FAA threshold to participate in the program by contributing a local match. The Committee believes that this new program will enable small airports to have their tower staffed with an FAA certified air traffic controller; thereby ensuring the safe and efficient movement of people and goods. The FAA is directed to continue operation of the Greenville, MS, contract tower, the Kinston Regional Jetport in North Carolina, the Joplin Regional Airport in Missouri, and the McKellar-Sipes Regional Airport tower in Jackson, TN; and to include the towers at New Bern and Hickory, NC, and at the Cape Girardeau Airport in Missouri under the contract tower cost-sharing program. The Committee urges FAA to work with the communities to explore alternatives, such as sharing tower operating costs, to maintain tower operations. Salisbury air traffic control tower .--The Committee directs the FAA to use such funds as necessary for operational expenses for an air traffic control tower, located in Salisbury, MD, provided that the Federal Aviation Administration has made a prior determination of eligibility for such tower to be included in the contract tower program. Technical noise assistance .--The Committee recommendation includes $100,000 for a technical assistance grant for a local citizens group to retain the services of a technical expert to facilitate the involvement of local citizens as the FAA pursues the existing plans to redesign the airspace. Equipment and staffing deficiencies in the New York/New Jersey region .--The Committee continues to be concerned about the reports regarding staffing and equipment needs at New York/New Jersey area towers, the New York TRACON and the New York Air Traffic Control Center. While progress has been made since last year's subcommittee hearing on this topic, the Committee believes more can be done. The Committee urges the FAA to redouble efforts to improve the safety and efficiency of these facilities. Air traffic control reclassification New York-New Jersey metropolitan region .--The Committee recognizes the recent agreement between the FAA and air traffic controllers to reclassify the compensation structure for air traffic controllers nationwide. However, the Committee is concerned that the initiative, as proposed, threatens to undermine recent advances achieved in increases in controllers staffing levels at the towers of the three major airports--Newark, Kennedy, and LaGuardia. While the reclassification proposes to grant controllers at the New York Center and the New York TRACON an appropriate pay grade level of ATC 12, the controllers at the three major towers would receive a level that is fully two levels lower, creating an unacceptably large disparity in pay. This new pay grade gap generated by the FAA reclassification will serve to undermine all Congress has achieved, as controllers will rapidly leave the towers seeking higher wages. The FAA will not be able to attract and retain the most qualified and seasoned controllers to serve the towers in this busy region. The towers, the New York TRACON, and the New York Center share the same complexity, high volume and density of traffic, and the controllers share the same high cost of living. Congress acted to equalize pay grades among the five facilities in the fiscal year 1991 appropriations act. Consistent with that act the Committee directs the Administrator to take such actions as are necessary to provide for equitable pay levels at the relevant FAA site in the New York/New Jersey area. Cooperative efforts to minimize delays .--The Committee is aware that the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, Continental Airlines, and the Federal Aviation Administration have entered into an information partnership in an effort to reduce delays in the Nation's most delayed airport, Newark International Airport in Newark, NJ. This partnership, which has been underway since December 1997, has resulted in a substantial effort by all parties to focus energy and resources on these projects which can help to improve the chronic delays suffered by consumers who utilize Newark. As part of this partnership, a list of eight initiatives has been compiled. These are the items upon which the partnership has agreed to focus for 1998. Quarterly meetings have been held to check progress and refocus resources where necessary. The eight initiatives are as follows: airspace redesign; controller automated spacing aid [CASA]; increased use of runway 29 for turbojet departures; Teterboro Airport ILS runway 19; New York ARTCC automated flight plan processing [DSP]; integrated terminal weather system [ITWS]; south final vector radar position-New York TRACON; and optimize airport arrival capacity-runway use. The Committee directs the FAA to provide a quarterly report citing the status of each of these eight initiatives. Reports are to include target dates for completion and explanations for those projects which may exceed their target dates. Reports are to include an assessment of what is required to complete the project (for example, environmental analysis, equipment, personnel). Frederick Municipal Airport .--The Committee understands that the NTSB has recommended the FAA transfer responsibility for the Frederick Municipal Airport airspace from BWI Airport to the Dulles TRACON. Radar coverage at Frederick Municipal Airport currently terminates at 2,300 feet. The transfer would result in lowering radar coverage at Frederick Municipal Airport to approximately 900 feet. The Committee encourages the transfer of responsibilities of this airspace consistent with safety and efficient airspace management. Rotorcraft procedures .--The Committee anticipates that air traffic control [ATC] systems will, in the near future, be able to provide dispatch reliability, or instrument flight rules [IFR] capability for both helicopters and the newest rotocraft technology--tiltroter aircraft. Under the present ATC system, the only current IFR, or all-weather-capable, airspace control service is designed for runway approaches and departures. Rotorcraft operating from off-airport sites lack efficient and consistent all-weather dispatch availability and reliability. The Committee encourages the FAA to review its existing terminal instrument procedures [TERPS] and IFR regulations/procedures and determine if changes are needed to facilitate the takeoff, flight and landing of helicopters, and tiltrotor aircraft. Special attention should be given to the feasibility of TERPS revisions which include procedures to provide noninterfering simultaneous operations and tiltrotor conversion/transition zones or procedures. The National Airspace System [NAS] would be improved by separating vertical flight aircraft from congested fixed-wing flight paths, and the Committee encourages the FAA to review the current procedures in this area. National airspace redesign. --The Committee has included $11,000,000 to support the administration's initiative to comprehensively review and design the domestic and oceanic airspace within the United States. Of this amount, $3,000,000 is provided to concentrate the administration's initial efforts on the eastern region, particularly on the redesign of the New York/New Jersey metropolitan airspace, consistent with the administration's plans. These initial efforts will support the planning and design challenges in the New York/New Jersey region's airspace, the most complex and densely traveled airspace in the world. The national and regional redesign will take advantage of new technologies, such as satellite navigation and aircraft capabilities, and new flight paths. The Committee encourages the administration to ensure that the final result of the redesign will deliver the greatest safety, efficiency and environmental benefits to system operators, users and citizens near airports, particularly those who are affected by air noise. Leased telecommunication services/RCL. --In the report accompanying last year's appropriation bill as well as in this report, the Committee has expressed concern about underutilization of the radio communications link [RCL], which is owned by FAA and is one of the largest microwave networks in the country. The alternative to increased use of the RCL is increased reliance on leased telecommunications. The Committee directed FAA to transfer to the radio communications link as much of the existing workload as possible to better utilize that resource. The Committee understands that FAA plans to use an additional 2,300 to 2,900 RCL circuits rather than leasing circuits from a private vendor. Even if FAA adopts this plan, it would still only be utilizing 56 to 61 percent of its analog circuits and still have a significant amount of digital capacity sitting idle. The Committee has concluded that FAA is likely to continue to underutilize its radio communications link [RCL] network in favor of leased telecommunications. The Committee suggests that FAA accommodate constrained air traffic services appropriations by disposing of a part of its underutilized RCL network and taking staffing savings. The Committee requests a report by March 1, 1999, from the FAA outlining a plan to more fully utilize RCL or a plan to decommission it. Given that FAA will apparently continue to underutilize the RCL and prefers leased telecommunications links, the Committee is recommending a reduction of $10,000,000 from the request for the systems maintenance subactivity. Digital mapping .--The Committee is aware that at St. Louis-Lambert international air traffic control tower the video mapper used for the final approach course was considered unusable by FAA standards thus cutting capacity during certain weather conditions. It was replaced with a digital mapper in order to keep capacity up and to meet standards to run simultaneous approaches. Controllers at the facility seek expanded use of the digital mapper. The Committee directs the FAA to work with the controllers at the St. Louis tower to expand the use of the digital mapping equipment consistent with all applicable safety standards. FAA data bases .--Over time, FAA has invested substantial resources in the development and maintenance of a large number of data bases. The growth and proliferation of data bases is a consequence of a number of factors including the wide scope of FAA's responsibilities, its organizational structure, and the widely differing dynamics of various components of the aviation industry. However, responsibility and/or control over the data bases is not centralized; instead it is spread among the various lines of business and other organizational elements who are the prime users of the data collected. There is little agencywide data integration. As such, FAA is becoming increasingly data rich and information poor. Accordingly, the Committee believes that the FAA should develop a data management plan that leads to optimized data sharing among FAA organizational elements; better control over the costs of data base management; the capability to review and analyze data on a subject as well as a functional basis; and enhanced capability of senior management to resolve time critical questions and issues that may cut across agency organizational elements. A report on the progress toward development of the plan should be made to the Senate Appropriations Committee and the House Appropriations Committee not later than 6 months from the date this legislation is enacted into law. Aviation regulation and certification The Committee recommends an appropriation of $624,879,000. Guidelines .--The Committee is concerned that FAA's proposed policy guidelines regarding the authority of law enforcement officers to carry weapons aboard aircraft may not adequately reflect the requirement that U.S. Secret Service personnel be able to carry firearms aboard aircraft in the most expeditious manner in the execution of their official duties. The protective mission of the Secret Service is unique, time sensitive, and critical to national security. The Committee believes it is imperative that special agents and officers of the Secret Service be included within any guidelines which provide the highest and most efficient level of access afforded to armed law enforcement officers on board aircraft. The FAA is directed to provide the Secret Service with the most unrestricted access provided to any law enforcement personnel in any issued regulations. The FAA shall keep this Committee informed as language is being formulated in regard to this issue. Aviation Security The Committee recommends $111,429,000, an increase of $13,950,000 over fiscal year 1998. Research and Acquisition The Committee recommends $92,340,000, the same level appropriated in fiscal year 1998. Administration of Airports The Committee recommends $47,891,000, the same level appropriated in fiscal year 1998. Commercial Space Transportation The Committee recommends $6,168,000, the same level appropriated in fiscal year 1998. Administration The Committee recommends $256,493,000, the same level appropriated in fiscal year 1998. Mentor-Protege Program. --The Committee supports the goals and objectives of the mentor-protege program, which was established by the FAA in 1997 in order to enhance the capabilities of socially and economically disadvantaged businesses, women-owned small businesses and other eligible entities, to compete for and successfully perform FAA contracts. The Committee encourages FAA procurement officials to use the program as a means of broadening the base of contractors who ultimately could compete for FAA contracts. The Committee is concerned, however, that despite the fact that three large companies have been approved to serve as mentors, no subcontracts have been awarded, to date, to protege firms because FAA procurement officials have opted not to use the program. In that regard, the Committee directs FAA to provide a report to the Senate and House Appropriations Committees within 6 months from the date of passage of this legislation on the progress of the Mentor-Protege Program and the impediments to its successful implementation. Reprogrammings .--The Committee is extremely concerned with the inspector general's recent findings of major variances in amounts proposed for reduction by budget line item to actual amounts reprogrammed. The FAA should not make changes to congressionally approved reprogramming notices, without congressional concurrence. To increase oversight in this area, the Administrator is directed to provide the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations, with line by line accounts of all future reprogramming actions taken subsequent to approval by Congress. Staff Offices The Committee recommends $73,193,000, the same level appropriated in fiscal year 1998. BILL LANGUAGE Second career training program .--The Committee has included bill language which was included in the President's budget request which prohibits the use of appropriated funds for the second career training program. This prohibition has been carried in annual appropriations acts for many years. Sunday premium pay .--The bill retains a provision, first included in the fiscal year 1995 appropriations bill, which prohibits FAA from paying Sunday premium pay, except in those cases where the individual actually worked on a Sunday. This provision is identical to that which was in effect for fiscal years 1995 98. It was requested by the administration for fiscal year 1999. Manned auxiliary flight service stations .--The Committee has retained bill language which was requested by the administration to prohibit the use of funds for operating a manned auxiliary flight service station in the contiguous United States. There is no funding provided in the ``Operations'' account for such stations in fiscal year 1999. Contract tower program .--The Committee has included language for a contract tower cost-sharing program. Secretary's discretionary transfer funds .--The Committee has included language that provides authority for the Secretary to transfer up to $60,000,000 from Coast Guard operating expenses, for the purpose of air traffic control operations and maintenance to enhance aviation safety and security. FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT (Airport and Airway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1998\1\ $1,900,477,000 Budget estimate, 1999 2,130,000,000 Committee recommendation 2,044,683,269 \1\Includes funds provided in the Fiscal Year 1998 Supplemental Appropriations Act. Under the ``Facilities and equipment'' appropriation, safety, capacity and efficiency of the Federal airway system are improved by the procurement and installation of new equipment and the construction and modernization of facilities to keep pace with aeronautical activity and in accordance with the Federal Aviation Administration's comprehensive capital investment plan [CIP], formerly called the national airspace system [NAS] plan. CIP MILESTONES FOR MAJOR SYSTEM ACQUISITIONS System name Year of first-site implementation Year of last-site implementation 1983 NAS plan 1991 CIP 1993 CIP 1997 CIP 1998 CIP 1983 NAS plan 1991 CIP 1993 CIP 1997 CIP 1998 CIP Advanced automation system [AAS] 1990 1991 1991 (\1\) (\1\) 1994 2001 2004 (\1\) (\1\) Air route surveillance radar [ARSR 4] 1998 1993 1994 1996 1996 1991 1996 1996 (\7\) 1999 Airport surface detection equipment [ASDE 3] 1987 1992 1993 1993 1993 1990 1994 1996 1999 1999 Automated weather observing system [AWOS] 1986 1989 1989 1989 1989 1990 1997 1997 2001 2002 Central weather processor [CWP] 1990 1991 1991 1991 1991 1991 1998 \8\1992 \8\1993 \8\1993 Flight service automation system [FSAS] 1984 1991 1991 1991 1991 1989 1995 1994 1995 1995 Mode S 1988 1993 1994 1994 1994 1993 1996 1996 1999 1999 Radio microwave link [RML] replacement and expansion 1985 1986 1986 1986 1986 1989 1994 1993 1993 1993 Terminal doppler weather radar [TDWR] (\9\) 1994 1994 1994 1994 (\9\) 1996 1996 (\10\) 2001 Voice switching and control system [VSCS] 1989 1995 1995 1995 1995 1992 1997 1997 1997 1997 \1\The AAS Program has been restructured into three areas: En route [DSR], terminal [STARS], and tower [TAP]. \2\STARS schedule was being rebaselined in keeping with new acquisition strategy. \3\TCCC schedule was being rebaselined to reflect the incorporation of surface management advisor [SMA]. \4\TCCC has been replaced by the Tower Automation Program [TAP]. \5\The Tower Automation Program [TAP] schedule is currently under review. \6\The Tower Automation Program [TAP] has been terminated. \7\ARSR 4 last-site implementation date had not been determined due to environmental issues at Ajo, AZ. \8\Dates denoted are for MWP I only. The CWP RWP segment has been eliminated as a continuation of the CWP Program, and has been merged with MWP II into the Weather and Radar Processor [WARP] Program. \9\The TDWR was not included in the 1983 NAS plan. \10\TDWR last-site implementation indefinite due to site availability and land acquisition problems. Source: FAA 1983 NAS plan; 1991 and 1993, 1995 CIP; 1997 and 1998 GAO ``Status of the FAA's Modernization Program.'' REASONS FOR DELAY AND COST INCREASES IN CIP PROJECTS System name Reasons for delay Advanced automation system [AAS] In general, AAS delays were due to an overly ambitious plan, inadequate FAA oversight of the contractor, and ineffective resolution of requirements issues. The AAS Program has been restructured into three areas: En route, terminal, and tower. Air route surveillance radar [ARSR 4] Problems with the radar's development and site preparation delayed first-site implementation. Testing took longer than originally expected. Delays have also occurred due to changes in system design, interface problems with other ATC systems, and slips in site construction. Recent delays are due to environmental issues at Ajo, AZ, which is the last site. Airport surface detection equipment [ASDE 3] Original delays occurred because FAA and the contractor underestimated software complexity. FAA changed some requirements, and testing uncovered some performance problems. Software development, establishing remote towers, site selection/preparation, and the addition of seven systems have delayed the program. Automated weather observing system [AWOS] Site prep, installation, and maintenance problems, as well as delays in receiving Government-furnished equipment contributed to original delays. Last-site implementation delay occurred because of communications funding shortfalls and installation delays of the communications infrastructure to deliver weather information. Recent delays are associated with the addition of ASOS systems per fiscal years 1997 98 congressional direction. Central weather processor [CWP] Early software development problems and software discrepancies during testing delayed the system in early stages. The program was descoped to just the CWP-MWP I segment, which is now fully implemented. Flight service automation system [FSAS] Original delays occurred because of software development and testing problems with the Model I system. Program implementation is complete. Mode S Problems in developing hardware and software during initial phases delayed the system, and software problems caused a delay in first-site implementation. Implementation of the last site has been moved due to en route interface requirements and site preparation delays. Radar microwave link [RML] replacement and expansion In the early stages, site acquisition and prep problems delayed the system. Other delays occurred because of a change in the prime contractor and due to problems encountered during operational test and evaluation. Program implementation is complete. Terminal doppler weather radar [TDWR] Site availability and land acquisition problems have delayed last-site implementation. Recent delays are associated with land procurement and environmental issues at the last five sites (Fort Lauderdale, San Juan, Las Vegas, Midway, and New York). Voice switching and control system [VSCS] Early delays were due to the two prototype contractors having technical difficulties in meeting FAA's requirements for system reliability. Additional delays occurred because of software development and integration problems during the upgrade of the prototype to a production model. The implementation schedule has not changed since the 1991 CIP. The last-site implementation was achieved on schedule in February 1997. The bill includes an appropriation of $2,044,683,269 for the facilities and equipment of the Federal Aviation Administration. The Committee's recommended distributions of the funds for each of the major accounts are as follows: FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT Projects Fiscal year 1999 budget estimate Committee recommendation Engineering, development, test, and evaluation: En route programs: Aviation weather services improvements $26,300,000 $26,300,000 Oceanic automation system 16,937,000 3,237,000 Next generation VHF air/ground communications system 500,000 4,706,000 Air traffic management [ATM] 47,800,000 64,300,000 Traffic flow management 3,287,000 3,287,000 En route automation program 118,000,000 113,000,000 Aeronautical data link [ADL] 16,500,000 23,000,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, en route programs 229,324,000 237,830,000 ================================== ========================== Terminal programs: Terminal Automation Program 74,700,000 74,700,000 Runway incursion reduction 3,168,000 9,168,000 Airport technology 7,383,000 5,000,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, terminal programs 85,251,000 88,868,000 ================================== ========================== Landing and navigational aids programs: Local area augmentation system [LAAS] 6,500,000 6,500,000 Wide area augmentation system [WAAS] for GPS 101,500,000 117,500,000 Navigation and surveillance 13,285,000 13,285,000 Loran-C upgrades 10,000,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, landing and navigational aids programs 121,285,000 147,285,000 ================================== ========================== Research, test, and evaluation equipment and facilities: Independent operational test and evaluation [IOT&E] sup 3,500,000 3,500,000 FAA Technical Center facility--technical building lease 5,290,000 5,290,000 NAS improvement of system support laboratory 2,000,000 2,000,000 Technical Center facilities 7,000,000 7,000,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, research, test, and evaluation equipment and facilities 17,790,000 17,790,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Total, engineering, development, test, and evaluation 453,650,000 491,773,000 ================================== ========================== Air traffic control facilities and equipment: En route programs: Long Range Radar [LRR] Program--replace/establish 5,700,000 5,700,000 En Route Automation Program 196,400,000 196,400,000 Next generation weather radar [Nexrad]--provide 4,900,000 4,900,000 Air traffic operations management system [ATOMS] 1,000,000 1,000,000 Weather and radar processor [WARP] 20,000,000 22,200,000 Aeronautical data link [ADL] applications 600,000 600,000 ARTCC building improvements/plant improvements 63,931,563 63,931,563 Voice switching and control system [VSCS] 14,500,000 12,500,000 Air traffic management 47,600,000 47,600,000 Critical communications support 2,400,000 1,850,000 DOD base closure--facility transfer 1,000,000 1,000,000 Backup emergency communications [BUEC]--interim 8,500,000 8,500,000 Air/ground communication radio frequency interference [RFI] 1,600,000 1,600,000 ATC beacon interrogator [ATCBI] replace 14,800,000 14,800,000 Air traffic control en route radar facilities 5,300,000 5,300,000 En route communications and control facilities improvement 3,126,731 2,000,000 Volcano monitor 2,000,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, en route programs 391,358,294 391,881,563 ================================== ========================== Terminal programs: Terminal doppler weather radar [TDWR]--provide 4,300,000 1,800,000 Terminal Automation Program 135,300,000 135,300,000 Airport surface detection equipment [ASDE] 5,600,000 5,600,000 Airport movement area safety system [AMASS] 7,000,000 9,800,000 Terminal air traffic control facilities--replace 82,300,000 82,300,000 Air traffic control tower [ATCT]/TRACON facilites--improve 22,722,280 22,722,280 Terminal voice switch replacement [TVSR] 11,500,000 10,300,000 Employee safety/OSHA and environmental compliance standards 22,000,000 22,000,000 Chicago TRACON 500,000 500,000 New Austin Airport at Bergstrom 2,500,000 2,500,000 Potomac TRACON 11,900,000 Northern California TRACON 27,600,000 17,900,000 Atlanta TRACON 18,200,000 12,200,000 Emergency transceivers--replacement 1,000,000 Airport surveillance radar [ASR 9] 6,300,000 6,300,000 Voice Recorder Replacement Program [VRRP] 3,000,000 3,000,000 NAS infrastructure management systems [NIMS] 22,000,000 22,000,000 Terminal facilities integration 5,600,000 Terminal digital radar [ASR 11] 76,100,000 76,100,000 ASR--weather system processor [WSP] 16,100,000 11,900,000 DOD/FAA facilities transfer 3,600,000 1,000,000 Precision runway monitors 3,300,000 3,300,000 Terminal radar [ASR]--improve 2,773,431 2,773,431 Terminal communications improvements 1,119,807 1,119,807 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, terminal programs 492,315,518 450,415,518 ================================== ========================== Flight service programs: Flight service station [FSS] automation 2,000,000 1,000,000 Automated surface observing system [ASOS] 9,900,000 20,977,000 FSAS operational and supportability implementation system [OASIS] 25,500,000 16,000,000 Flight service facilities improvement 1,364,400 1,364,400 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, flight services 38,764,400 39,341,400 ================================== ========================== Landing and Navigational Aids Program: VOR/DME/TACAN network plan 1,000,000 1,000,000 Instrument landing system [ILS]--establish/upgrade 8,000,000 18,000,000 ILS replace Mark 1A, 1B, and 1C 2,100,000 2,100,000 Tactical landing system 3,000,000 Low level windshear alert system [LLWAS]--upgrade to phase I 3,000,000 3,000,000 Approach Lighting System Improvement Program [ALSIP] 1,000,000 2,500,000 Runway visual range [RVR] 2,000,000 2,000,000 Gulf of Mexico Offshore Program 2,400,000 2,400,000 Distance measuring equipment [DME]--sustain 1,200,000 1,200,000 Wide area augmentation system for GPS 16,000,000 Nondirectional beacon [NDB]--sustain 1,000,000 1,000,000 Visual NAVAIDS--establish/expand 400,000 400,000 Navigational and landing aids--improve 2,761,788 8,761,788 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, landing and navigational aids 40,861,788 45,361,788 ================================== ========================== Other ATC facilities programs: Alaskan NAS interfacility communications system [ANICS] 3,500,000 6,000,000 Fuel storage tank replacement and monitoring 10,600,000 10,600,000 FAA buildings and equipment--improve/modernize 8,000,000 4,000,000 Electrical power systems--sustain/support 20,400,000 15,000,000 Air navigational aids and air traffic control facilities (local projects) 2,000,000 2,000,000 Computer-aided engineering graphics [CAEG] replacement 1,000,000 1,000,000 Aircraft and Related Equipment Program 5,000,000 2,000,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, other ATC facility programs 50,500,000 40,600,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Total, air traffic control facilities and equipment 1,013,800,000 967,600,269 ================================== ========================== Nonair traffic control facilities and equipment: Support equipment: NAS Management Automation Program [NASMAP] 800,000 800,000 Hazardous materials management 17,000,000 17,000,000 Aviation safety analysis system [ASAS] 11,600,000 11,600,000 Operational data management system [ODMS] 1,200,000 1,000,000 Logistics support systems and facilities 2,300,000 2,300,000 Test equipment--maintenance support for replacement 500,000 500,000 Integrated flight quality assurance 3,000,000 3,000,000 Safety performance analysis system [SPAS] 3,500,000 3,500,000 Performance enhancement system [PENS] 9,700,000 9,700,000 National Aviation Safety Data Analysis Center [NASDAC] 1,800,000 1,800,000 FAA employee housing--provide 8,000,000 8,000,000 Facility security risk management 1,000,000 1,000,000 Information security--NAS information coordination 2,000,000 2,000,000 Explosive detection systems 100,000,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, support equipment 162,400,000 62,200,000 ================================== ========================== Training, equipment, and facilities: Distance learning 2,100,000 National airspace system [NAS] training facilities 400,000 400,000 Aeronautical Center training and support facilities 12,000,000 12,000,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal, training, equipment, and facilities 14,500,000 12,400,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Total, nonair traffic control facilities and equipment 176,900,000 74,600,000 ================================== ========================== Mission support: System support and services: System engineering and development support 29,800,000 28,960,000 Program support leases 31,100,000 27,500,000 NAS modernization integration 8,000,000 8,000,000 Logistics support services 5,600,000 5,600,000 Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center--lease 14,800,000 14,800,000 In-plant national airspace system [NAS] contract support services 2,000,000 2,000,000 Transition engineering support 41,800,000 41,800,000 Frequency and spectrum engineering--provide 2,700,000 1,500,000 Permanent change of station [PCS] 3,500,000 2,500,000 FAA system architecture 4,500,000 2,000,000 Technical services support contract [TSSC] 51,000,000 47,550,000 Resource Tracking Program [RTP] 1,000,000 500,000 Center for Advanced Aviation System Development 57,000,000 57,000,000 Year 2000 date change program 36,000,000 36,000,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Total, mission support 280,800,000 275,710,000 ================================== ========================== Personnel and related expenses 235,210,000 235,000,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Total, all activities 2,130,000,000 2,044,683,269 engineering, development, test, and evaluation The Committee recommends $369,973,000 for various engineering, development, test, and evaluation activities. En route programs En route automation includes the display system replacement [DSR] as a cost-effective modification to the initial sector suite system [ISSS]; display channel complex rehost [DCCR], a low-risk contingency system; advanced en route automation [AERA], enhancements providing direct benefits to airway users; en route software development support [ERSDS], maintains software in existing system; en route automation equipment, maintains existing hardware; flight data input/output [FDIO]; and en route stand alone radar training system [ESARTS]. Aviation weather service improvements .--The Committee has included $26,300,000 as requested by the administration. Oceanic automation system .--The FAA has already canceled phase two of the project and FAA actions to reprogram fiscal year 1998 funds and to reduce the fiscal year 1999 budget raise questions as to the priority of this initiative. Moreover, many FAA officials involved with this project have argued for a revision of the project's scope. The Committee recommends a reduction for this project and notes that project officials report that fiscal year 1998 funds remain to complete the data link segment of phase one and to fund initial system maintenance. Air traffic management [ATM] .--The Committee recommends an increase in this activity in order to support higher priority items in ATM activities identified by the administration. The Committee recommendation includes funding to support the revised approach to accelerate the testing and deployment of the traffic management advisor single center and the passive final approach spacing tool. These tools will provide controllers with increased capability to make efficient decisions regarding the sequencing and runway assignments of terminal arrival aircraft and en route arrival aircraft. The Committee is aware of the administration's plan to expedite early deployment of free flight phase I technologies by December 2002 at the sites identified by the Free Flight Select Committee. The Committee believes that one of the most important free flight phase I core capability programs is the center/TRACON automation system, which consists of traffic management advisor single center and passive final approach spacing tool [passive FAST]. The Committee supports the completion of the FAA's existing feasibility study that will determine if passive FAST can be implemented at the New York TRACON without multicenter TMA. The Committee directs that if the feasibility study shows that passive FAST can be implemented in the New York TRACON, the FAA should do so as soon as possible. If the FAA implements passive FAST at the New York TRACON, the Committee believes that the FAA should focus its priority for site adaptation of passive FAST on the airport with the highest levels of congestion as measured by air traffic control delays per 1,000 operations. The Committee directs the Administrator to provide, within 60 days, a report detailing the timeline and funding profile for implementation of passive FAST, if feasible, at the major commercial airports served by the New York TRACON. En route automation program .--In addition to the recommended funding level, the Committee provided reprogramming approval for the host hardware and software suite replacement and the FAA has scaled back the conflict probe effort from implementation at 20 centers to 5 centers. In addition, the conflict probe has unobligated balances in excess of $5,000,000 in this account. The Committee has reduced the requested levels accordingly. Aeronautical data link [ADL] .--The Committee recommendation has been increased by $6,500,000 in this activity to support higher items identified by the FAA. Terminal programs Terminal automation program. --The Committee has provided the requested $74,700,000 for the terminal automation program, also known as standard terminal automation replacement system [STARS]. The contract was awarded in September 1996. Fiscal year 1999 funds will be used to continue to test and enhance commercial-off-the-shelf/nondevelopmental item [COTS/NDI]-based automated radar terminal systems for initial use in terminal radar approach control facilities and to develop the final system capability. The STARS contract is an exceptionally aggressive contract. For a variety of reasons, the FAA is behind schedule in developing the full service software for the initial STARS configuration and the development of STARS software entails several risks that are likely to cause further delays. In addition, the computer-human interface issues that have emerged in the last 9 months are likely to necessitate further software requirements growth. Current estimates anticipate a 6- to 9-month delay in the program and cost growth in excess of $200,000,000. The FAA and the contractor have acknowledged the risk that the software development schedule may slip by several months and they currently have risk mitigation efforts underway. The Committee recommendation includes the entire request for the STARS Program, but the Committee is increasingly concerned about program slippages, cost growth, and the severity of the computer-human interface problems. The Committee is increasingly concerned that procurements like STARS, WAAS, and the deepwater capability replacement program are beyond the capability of the Department to manage given the complexity of the systems and the critical nature of the external factors that influence program development. The Committee would urge the Department to approach modernization efforts in a more incremental manner, rather than attempting--with an exceptionally high probability of failure--to revolutionize entire functions or capabilities with a single procurement. Runway incursion reduction .--The Committee recommends an increase of $6,000,000 in this program for the inclusion of a surface movement adviser demonstration initiative. The demonstration would test a collection of tools that provide terminal data to participating airlines and permit the exchange of data that support the efficient movement of aircraft on the airport surface. Airport technology .--The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for this account, the same amount as appropriated in fiscal year 1998. Landing and navigational aids programs Local area augmentation system [LAAS] for GPS .--The Committee has included $6,500,000 as requested by the administration. Wide area augmentation system [WAAS] .--The Committee reiterates the concern expressed in the fiscal year 1998 appropriations legislation concerning the wide area augmentation system. Accuracy, integrity, availability, continuity, and service volume are the major performance goals for the system. Accuracy is defined as the degree to which an aircraft's position as calculated using the system conforms to its true position. Integrity is the system's ability to provide timely warnings when its signals are providing erroneous information and, accordingly, should not be relied upon for navigation. Availability is the probability that, at any given time, the system will meet FAA's accuracy and integrity requirements for a specified phase of flight. Continuity is the probability that the system's signal will meet accuracy and integrity requirements continuously for a specified period. Service volume is the area of coverage for which the system's signal will meet availability requirements. On May 13, 1998, the Department of Transportation Inspector General reported: ``* * * The WAAS program has technical and program uncertainties. Uncertainties relating to interference of the WAAS signal from unintentional and intentional jamming, communications satellites, and ionospheric variations must be resolved. Because of these uncertainties, FAA is now reconsidering the need for a backup system to WAAS. In our opinion, some type of backup system for WAAS will be needed for the foreseeable future. In addition, the national airspace system modernization task force is discussing alternatives regarding the future phases of WAAS. In our opinion, determination of the intended ultimate use of WAAS (whether it will be a primary or a sole means of navigation) is the most critical issue impacting the WAAS program. ``The ultimate decision on whether WAAS will be used as a sole or primary means of navigation will impact FAA and the aviation industry. For example, FAA currently plans to begin decommissioning its existing navigation aids in 2005 and transition to WAAS as a sole means of navigation. If WAAS is not a sole means of navigation, FAA will incur additional expenditures, not currently planned, to acquire, upgrade, modernize, and maintain existing navigation aids. FAA's decision will also impact the aviation industry plans regarding avionics equipage. Furthermore, in our opinion, this schedule is very optimistic given all the uncertainties in the WAAS Program.'' Because of the uncertainties of the WAAS Program, the rethinking on the need for a backup system, the escalating cost estimates of the program, the number (and difficulty) of critical unresolved issues and lack of clarity in program scope and definition, the seemingly questionable and uncoordinated exercise of contract line items earlier this year for phases 2 and 3 software development and systems engineering tasks, and a range of other issues that of and by themselves would cause the Committee serious concern, combined with the FAA's prior and current history of difficulty in managing large, complex procurements, the Committee has conditioned the release of all WAAS funding. The entire WAAS facilities and equipment request has been provided for WAAS for engineering, development, test, and evaluation, and the Secretary is directed, with the Administrator of the FAA, not to commit any funding to this program until certifying to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations that the following issues have been addressed in the affirmative: --(1) WAAS is a sole means of navigation; --(2) The signal continuity issues have been solved without additional facilities or funding; and --(3) The cost benefit ratio of this program exceeds that of other landing and navigational aids programs utilizing the current $3,049,000,000 January 9, 1998, FAA estimate or any other FAA estimate in excess of that amount for the WAAS program. Loran-C .--The Committee continues to support steps to ensure that loran will be available to meet ongoing user navigation safety and efficiency requirements. Loran provides important multimodal navigation capabilities, well-proved, cost-effective, and significant safety and efficiency benefits. The Committee continues to be convinced that support of the loran infrastructure is prudent to meet continuing requirements for the technology, particularly in light of the difficultly the FAA is experiencing with WAAS. Clearly, a GPS/loran alternative to WAAS may have significant cost and operational advantages in both the short and longer term and failure to maintain the investment in loran infrastructure at this time would be irresponsible. Research, test, and evaluation equipment and facilities Research, test, and evaluation equipment and facilities .--The Committee recommends $17,790,000, the same amount requested by the administration. AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT En route programs Weather and radar processor [WARP] .--The Committee recommendation includes $2,200,000 for the program to support URET CCLD. The increase will allow the establishment of the connection between the National Weather Service rapid weather update cycles and the WARP system, providing critical winds aloft information for URET CCLD. Air route traffic control center [ARTCC] building improvement/plant improvements .--FAA is requesting $63,931,563 to perform needed modernization and expansion at its ARTCC's to accommodate new equipment that will modernize controller displays and communications systems. The Committee has provided the full request. Critical communications support .--The Committee recommends a reduction of $550,000 to fund higher priority items in the air traffic management activity. Backup emergency communications [BUEC]. --The Committee recommends $8,500,000 for this activity. The Committee notes that large unobligated balances have tended to grow in this program and the recommended level is sufficient to maintain the current pace of backup emergency communications equipment replacement. En route communications and control facilities improvement. --The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for this activity, an increase of $1,081,700 over fiscal year 1998 appropriated levels. Volcano monitor .--The Committee has included an additional $2,000,000 for the Alaska Volcano Observatory for equipment and data transmission facilities to monitor suspect volcanoes across the Alaska peninsula and the Aleutian Islands. The Committee urges the FAA to incorporate this item in its future budget requests. Terminal programs Terminal doppler weather radar [TDWR] .--Due to uncertainty over the plans for TDWR systems at two locations due to land acquisition problems, $2,500,000 of the request is unnecessary at the current time. Terminal automation program .--The administration is requesting $135,300,000 to procure 25 STARS systems and 12 support systems and necessary actions to allow STARS installation at the TRACON's. The Committee has provided the full requested amounts. Airport movement area safety system [AMASS] .--The Committee recommends an increase in this activity of $2,800,000. Terminal air traffic control facilities .--The Committee has provided $82,300,000 of new appropriated funds for this activity and notes that $7,800,000 of fiscal year 1998 appropriated funds have been proposed for reprogramming by the Federal Aviation Administration. The recommended level includes funding to keep the construction of the new tower at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport on schedule. Further, of the funds available for this activity, the Committee directs $1,900,000 for the completion of the Lambert-St. Louis air traffic control tower; $1,000,000 for the Pangborn Memorial Airport air traffic control tower; $2,000,000 for the construction of an air traffic control tower at Paine Field; $1,000,000 for a replacement tower at Logan International Airport; $100,000 to complete the engineering work for the new air traffic control tower at Port Columbus International Airport; $1,300,000 for the Lawton air traffic control tower; and $2,000,000 for the North Las Vegas air traffic control tower. Martin State Airport .--The Committee is concerned that, despite the clear direction contained in the Senate report that accompanied the fiscal year 1998 Transportation appropriations bill, the FAA has failed to program funding to replace the air traffic control tower at Martin State Airport in Maryland. The Committee expects the FAA to initiate replacement of the tower immediately and to report back by February 1, 1999, on the status and construction schedule for the project. Airport traffic control tower [ATCT]/TRACON facilities .--The administration is requesting $22,722,280 to upgrade and improve various terminal facilities and equipment on a continuing basis to provide an acceptable level of safe service and to meet current and future operational requirements. The Committee recommends the requested level for fiscal year 1999. Terminal voice switch replacement [TVSR] .--The Committee recommends a reduction of $1,200,000 in the request due to the delay in completion of the acceptance testing of the redesigned switch. Accordingly, FAA is requesting funds for more switches that it can field during the fiscal year. Potomac TRACON .--The administration is requesting $11,900,000 for the Potomac TRACON. The Committee appropriation for fiscal year 1998 is sufficient for proposed program initiatives for the Potomac TRACON. Northern California TRACON/Atlanta TRACON .--The Committee recommends a reduction in these two projects consistent with funding the completion of both projects over 2 fiscal years. Accordingly, the fiscal year 1999 fiscal year funding requirement is reduced and the resulting fiscal year 2000 funding requirement will be increased to the fiscal year 1999 appropriated levels. Emergency transceivers--replacement .--The Committee recommends no funding for this activity for fiscal year 1999. Airport surveillance radar [ASR 9] .--The Committee is concerned about reports that the FAA did not include Washington County Regional Airport in Hagerstown, MD, among airports to initially receive service from the ASR 9 system currently being installed near Martinsburg, WV. The Committee directs the FAA to ensure that the system has the capacity and/or interface abilities to provide expanded radar coverage for aircraft operations to and from the Washington County Regional Airport. Terminal facilities integration .--The Committee recommends this activity be funded out of the terminal facilities modernization program or the specific major system acquisition program. Terminal digital radar (ASR 11) .--The Committee is aware that the slippage in the STARS Program schedule has a waterfall effect on several other major system acquisition programs. Accordingly, the resulting 6-month delay in the ASR 11 survey and design schedule at 16 sites provides a funding cushion in the fiscal year 1999 request. The Committee directs the FAA to use the additional funding flexibility in this program to initiate survey and design work for new radars to serve Anchorage International Airport in Anchorage, AK; central Oregon (Deschutes and Jefferson Counties); the mountainous region between Butte, Helena, and Bozeman, MT; and Provo and Salt Lake City International Airport in Salt Lake City, UT. ASR weather system processor [WSP] .--The Committee has reduced the request by $4,200,000 because the FAA will not be able to deploy the fifth limited production system prior to December 2000. DOD/FAA facilities transfer .--The Committee recommends a reduction in the funding for this activity. The functions of the DOD facilities will not necessarily transfer within fiscal year 1999. Currently, the transition of the functions is anticipated within 18 months of the April 1, 1999, scheduled date. FAA anticipates assuming the functions at an existing FAA facility. The funds provided are sufficient for the transfer. Flight service programs Flight service station [FSS] automation .--The Committee recommends a reduction in this activity of $1,000,000. The reduced level is sufficient to remedy the power fluctuation problems contained in the request. Automated surface observing system [ASOS] .--The administration requested $9,900,000 for ASOS. The Committee has provided $20,977,000. The Committee intends that the requested $9,900,000 will be used to continue commissioning systems procured through fiscal year 1998 and for related program management costs. The Committee continues to be concerned that the FAA has not adequately funded the program for several years. Adequate funding was not provided for connectivity lines, controller equipment, or operation and maintenance funds. That oversight has left the FAA short of assets to fund ASOS systems for nontowered airports. The FAA, the National Transportation Safety Board [NTSB], and user aviation associations have identified over 200 sites which should be equipped with ASOS; $9,577,000 of the additional funding shall be used to procure additional ASOS systems toward the identified requirement. The Committee is aware of an advanced technology program, the precision airport location system [PALS], that promises to provide accurate, timely, and representative automated airport surface weather observations of visibility and sky condition to pilots, air traffic control, and other aviation weather users. The Committee recommendation includes $1,500,000 for the acceleration of the independent operational test and evaluation and first article testing of this technology and urges the FAA to evaluate this technology as a complement to the ASOS infrastructure. FSAS operational and supportability implementation system [OASIS] .--The Committee has reduced the request by $9,500,000 because system deployment will fall 18 systems less than planned in fiscal year 1999. This program should be reviewed and the FAA should address the human factor concerns raised by the air traffic controllers prior to deployment. Landing and navigational aids programs Atlanta Hartsfield International Airport .--The Committee urges the FAA to proceed quickly to provide and install the necessary equipment to upgrade and equip the new commuter runway and the new airport air traffic control tower. The appropriated levels in this account provide sufficient resources for necessary equipment and installation at Atlanta Hartsfield International Airport. Wide area augmentation system [WAAS] .--The Committee recommends a reduction in this account consistent with the treatment of this program elsewhere in this account. Instrument landing system [ILS] .--The Committee, consistent with the continued concern about the viability and cost effectiveness of the WAAS system, recommends an increase in the ILS procurement and installation program of $10,000,000. Priority consideration should be given to Burlington-Alamance Regional Airport and Stanly County Airport in North Carolina, North Las Vegas Airport and McCarran Airport in Nevada, Fresno Yosemite International Airport in California, Stennis International Airport in Mississippi, complete the installation of an ILS at Bessemer Airport in Alabama, install a glideslope indicator at Clovis Airport in New Mexico, Olive Branch Airport in Mississippi, and Hays Municipal Airport in Kansas. Tactical landing system .--The Committee recommended $3,000,000 for the establishment of tactical landing system test programs at Boeing Field in Seattle, WA, Pullman/Moscow, ID, Friedman Memorial Airport, ID, and at Logan/Cache County and Heber Airports in Utah. Approach Lighting System Improvement Program [ALSIP] .--The Committee recommends an increase of $1,500,000 for the initiation of a MALSR system at Juneau International Airport. This project will complement the substantial strides and efforts that have been made to reduce the flight restrictions due to weather and visibility at this airport. Visual navigation aids. --The Committee is aware of a plan to install two localizer directional aids and a precision runway monitor for Newark International Airport that will enable the FAA to conduct simultaneous parallel approaches in visual meteoric conditions and marginal visual meteoric conditions. This equipment will help to reduce the numerous severe delays and enhance safety at the airport. The Committee directs the Administrator to begin preliminary work for the installation of this equipment. To this end, the Committee has provided $2,000,000 for modeling simulation, risk assessment, site survey and other environmental work associated with this installation. Navigational and landing aids .--The recommended level has been increased by $2,000,000 to reflect changing programmatic priorities of the Federal Aviation Administration. The additional increase in the funding level over the request is for development work on a low cost next generation precision gyroscope utilizing silicon manufacturing technologies. In this development effort, the Committee directs the FAA to work with the University of Alabama to build on the substantial work that has already been done in this area to facilitate the expedited development of a lower cost gyroscope for application in navigation systems. Other ATC facilities programs Alaskan NAS interfacility communications system [ANICS] .--The Committee recommendation is sufficient to substantially complete this activity. FAA buildings and equipment--improve/modernize .--The Committee recommends a reduction in this activity to increase the appropriation for higher-priority activities. Electrical power systems--sustain/support .--The Committee recommends $15,000,000 for this activity, and the Committee notes that there is currently unobligated balances for this activity of which a portion was proposed for reprogramming in fiscal year 1998. Aircraft and related equipment program .--The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for this activity, the same level appropriated in fiscal year 1998. Nonair traffic control facilities and equipment Operational data management system [ODMS] .--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for this activity, the same level appropriated in fiscal year 1998. Explosive detection system .--The Committee recommends no funding for this activity in the ``Facilities and equipment'' account. Sufficient levels have been provided in the ``Airport Improvement Program'' account to accommodate the airports' demand for explosive detection equipment. The Committee continues to be concerned by the slow pace of installation of the equipment that has already been procured and the low utilization rates of the equipment that has been installed. The Committee encourages the FAA to work with interested airports to promote the integration of equipment provided by prior appropriations for explosive detection equipment into current airport and carrier operations and to facilitate airports' use of Airport Improvement Program funding for acquisition of explosive detection systems. Training, equipment, and facilities Distance learning .--The Committee recommends no appropriation for this activity. Mission support System engineering and development support .--The Committee recommends $28,960,000 for this activity, the level appropriated in fiscal year 1998. Program support leases .--The Committee recommends $27,500,000 for this activity, the level appropriated in fiscal year 1998. NAS modernization integration .--The Committee includes $8,000,000 for training, procedures, testing, airspace analysis, and other activities to facilitate the modernization of the NAS consistent with the recommendations of the NAS modernization task force recommendations. Frequency and spectrum engineering--provide .--The Committee recommends $1,500,000 for this activity, the level appropriated in fiscal year 1998. Permanent change of station [PCS] .--The Committee recommends $2,500,000 for this activity. The Committee is confident that the agency can manage the demands of this activity within that appropriation. FAA system architecture .--The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for this activity. There are unobligated balances that the agency can draw upon for this activity, and the Committee notes that this activity has been offered as a source for reprogramming activities. Technical services support contract .--The Committee recommends $47,550,000 for this activity consistent with the agency's desire to support higher priority activities. Year 2000 date change program .--The Committee recommends no appropriation for this activity pursuant to previous reprogramming action and supplemental action to accelerate the agency's activities to correct year 2000 deficiencies. The Committee expects that the FAA Administrator will promptly notify the Committee of additional identified requirements to resolve the year 2000 problems. MAJOR EQUIPMENT ACTIVITY TERMINAL DOPPLER WEATHER RADAR City Acceptance Commissioning dates Memphis July 1993 December 1994. Houston Intercontinental March 1993 July 1994. Atlanta April 1993 December 1995. Washington National February 1994 January 1996. Denver December 1993 August 1995. Chicago O'Hare March 1994 July 1996. St. Louis May 1994 February 1995. Orlando June 1994 April 1996. New Orleans July 1994 March 1996. Tampa December 1994 April 1996. Miami November 1995 June 1996. Pittsburgh December 1994 July 1997. Andrews AFB December 1994 August 1996 Newark December 1994 October 1997. Boston April 1995 January 1996. Kansas City December 1994 July 1995. Detroit March 1996 September 1996. Houston Hobby August 1995 July 1996. Dallas/Love May 1995 January 1996. Dallas/Fort Worth June 1995 June 1996. Dayton May 1995 April 1998. Wichita June 1995 September 1995. Indianapolis July 1995 October 1996. Cincinnati July 1996 June 1997. Philadelphia July 1996 October 1997. Phoenix March 1997 March 1997. Milwaukee March 1997 November 1997. Chicago Midway To be determined To be determined. Cleveland July 1996 October 1996. Columbus December 1996 May 1997. San Juan To be determined To be determined. West Palm Beach February 1996 May 1997. Nashville April 1997 February 1998. Louisville June 1997 April 1998. Washington Dulles November 1996 March 1998. Charlotte September 1995 December 1995. Salt Lake City March 1997 April 1998. Fort Lauderdale To be determined To be determined. Baltimore November 1996 May 1997. Raleigh/Durham April 1997 January 1998. Minneapolis March 1997 May 1997. Oklahoma City March 1997 April 1997. Tulsa May 1997 April 1998. New York City (JFK and LGA) To be determined To be determined. Las Vegas To be determined To be determined. AIRPORT SURFACE DETECTION EQUIPMENT [ASDE 3] Site location Delivery date Commissioning date FAA Academy\1\ FAA Technical Center\2\ Pittsburgh, PA December 1989 June 1996. San Francisco November 1991 October 1995. Dallas/Fort Worth\3\ February 1992 March 1995. Philadelphia February 1992 March 1996. Los Angeles\3\ August 1992 April 1995. Detroit August 1992 December 1994. Cleveland August 1992 December 1994. Boston August 1992 March 1995. Portland August 1992 December 1994. Atlanta September 1992 January 1995. Seattle September 1992 December 1993. Los Angeles\3\ February 1993 February 1995. Denver (DIA)\3\ March 1993 May 1995. St. Louis December 1993 February 1995. Denver (DIA)\3\ December 1993 October 1995. New York-Kennedy January 1994 February 1995. Minneapolis July 1994 March 1995. Anchorage August 1994 October 1995. New Orleans October 1994 September 1995. Baltimore November 1994 June 1995. Kansas City December 1994 May 1995. Miami February 1995 November 1996. Houston\3\ February 1995 August 1995. Memphis June 1995 December 1997. Chicago June 1995 April 1996. Houston\3\ August 1996 July 1997. Charlotte June 1999 November 1999. Louisville\4\ March 1999 November 1999. Reagan Washington National February 1996 April 1997. Cincinnati October 1995 September 1996. Dulles May 1997 February 1998. San Diego November 1995 November 1996. Dallas-Fort Worth\3\\4\ November 1996 November 1997. Andrews AFB January 1999 November 1999. Salt Lake City\4\ February 1998 February 1999. Las Vegas\4\ June 1998 June 1999. New York-LaGuardia October 1998 October 1999. Newark April 1997 April 1998. \1\FAA training/field support/depot support facility. \2\To be relocated to Aeronautical Center, Oklahoma City. \3\Dual sensor facilities. \4\Assets redirected from Tampa, Raleigh-Durham, Orlando, Orange County. TERMINAL AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL FACILITIES Funding for terminal air traffic control facilities started in previous years: Merrill, AK Fort Smith, AR St. Louis (TRACON), MO St. Paul, MN Syracuse, NY Portland, OR Houston (HOU), TX Salt Lake City (ATCT), UT Salt Lake City (TRACON), UT Chicago (O'Hare), IL Chicago (Midway), IL Palwaukee, IL Pontiac, MI Albany, NY Windsor Locks, CT Klamath Falls, OR Birmingham, AL Little Rock, AR North Las Vegas, NV Topeka, KS Dallas (Addison), TX Bedford, MA Phase III for terminal air traffic control facilities started in fiscal year 1997 and before: Newark, NJ Seattle, WA LaGuardia, NY Grand Canyon, AZ Phase II funding for terminal air traffic control facilities started in fiscal year 1998 and before: Boston, MA Oakland, CA Roanoke, VA Newport News, VA Port Columbus, OH Islip, NY Seattle, WA Everett, WA Fort Lauderdale, FL Manchester, NH Phase I funding for terminal air traffic control facilities to be started in fiscal year 1999: Reno, NV Asheville, NC Tulsa (Riverside), OK Personnel and related expenses Personnel and related expenses .--The Committee recommends $220,000,000 for this expense, the same level appropriated in fiscal year 1998. The reduction from the request can be accommodated by reduction in travel expenses. ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS The Committee has not included the advance appropriations for fiscal years 2000 through 2006 requested by the administration. There has been substantial uncertainty and change with respect to projects financed through the ``Facilities and equipment'' account, and the Committee believes that continuing, annual congressional review of the status and funding needs of these projects is critical. RESEARCH, ENGINEERING, AND DEVELOPMENT (Airport and Airway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1998 $199,183,000 Budget estimate, 1999 290,000,000 Committee recommendation 173,627,000 This appropriation finances research, engineering, and development programs to improve the national air traffic control system by increasing its safety, security, productivity, and capacity. The programs are designed to meet the expected air traffic demands of the future and to promote flight safety. The major objectives are to keep the current system operating safely and efficiently; to protect the environment; and to modernize the system through improvements in facilities, equipment, techniques, and procedures in order to insure that the system will safely and efficiently handle the volume of aircraft traffic expected to materialize in the future. The bill includes $173,627,000 for research, engineering, and development. The Committee suggests the following allocation: Fiscal year 1999 budget estimate Committee recommendation System development and infrastructure: $2,148,000 $1,164,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal 16,768,000 15,784,000 ================================== ========================== Capacity and air traffic management technology: 4,044,000 7,000,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal 107,011,000 11,902,000 ================================== ========================== Weather 12,284,000 19,284,000 Aircraft safety technology: 4,750,000 4,750,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal 34,886,000 46,114,000 ================================== ========================== System security technology: 39,545,000 42,200,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal 54,872,000 53,423,000 ================================== ========================== Human factors and aviation medicine: 9,903,000 9,903,000 ---------------------------------- -------------------------- Subtotal 22,229,000 22,229,000 ================================== ========================== Environment and energy 3,391,000 2,891,000 Innovative/cooperative research 2,330,000 2,000,000 ================================== ========================== Total 290,000,000 173,627,000 The objectives of and Committee recommendations for the 10 major activities in FAA's Research, Engineering, and Development Program are discussed below. SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT AND INFRASTRUCTURE Objectives: To provide (1) a systems engineering approach and benefit/cost analyses to the development of a comprehensive research, engineering, and development program and (2) visibility, accountability, coordination, and control of the research, engineering, and development activities. System planning and resource management .--The Committee recommends $1,164,000, the same level appropriated in fiscal year 1998. FAA technical laboratory facility .--The administration's request was $9,730,000 for work at the FAA Technical Center. The Committee fully funds the administration's request. Center for Advanced Aviation Systems Development [CAASD] .--The Committee fully funds CAASD, which is for the Mitre support contract. CAPACITY AND AIR TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY Objectives: To ensure that air traffic management operations safety is maintained and then improved, to increase system capacity and utilization of existing airspace and airport resources, and to accommodate greater user flexibility and efficiency. System capacity, planning, and improvement .--The Committee recommends a reduction from the original request to $3,000,000 and includes an additional $4,000,000 for flight 2000 planning and scoping activities. A primary stated goal of the research is to develop an overall strategy to enhance capacity. The Committee encourages the FAA to focus on that goal and to narrow the budget justification's scope of initiatives advertised under this activity. The recommended funding is adequate for these tasks. Cockpit technology .--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for this initiative. This funding is adequate for the principal focus to design and implement change 7 to TCAS II. Flight 2000 .--The Committee has included $4,000,000 in system capacity, planning, and improvement, to allow the FAA to complete the initial program planning activities into flight 2000 concepts. The Committee notes that the request for fiscal year 1999 differs from the fiscal year 1998 request primarily in the ambitiousness of the program and in the discussion of WAAS. While the Committee continues to believe that GPS based navigational and landing systems have substantial promise for the aviation community, the Committee is concerned about the FAA's desire to initiate research into this area with a request that would increase the RE&D program by 45 percent. Given the budgetary constraints faced by the Committee, the uncertainties of whether WAAS can ever be cost effective, the prior difficulty that FAA has had with overly ambitious initiatives into modernization or new technologies (MLS, AAS, and WAAS), the Committee directs the FAA to focus on accomplishing the tasks that must be completed prior to the start of a more robust flight 2000 effort--namely, definition and validation of a flight 2000 operational concept and evaluation, development of a flight 2000 integrated program plan, and further development of a plan to implement flight 2000 capabilities in Alaska, Hawaii, and Oakland Air Route Traffic Control Center [ARTCC] oceanic and domestic airspace. The recommended level in system capacity, planning, and improvement is sufficient for those initiatives. Operations concept validation .--The Committee does not recommend any funding for this effort at this time. The operations concept validation is contingent upon the transition to a free flight environment. Although the Committee endorsed, in concept, such a transition, it is premature to establish a transition plan to an environment that has yet to be adequately defined by the FAA or endorsed by the Congress. The Committee would welcome the reconsideration of this initiative once greater clarity and definition is available on the free flight concept. Software engineering R&D .--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for this initiative to assess the prior work of the Office of Information Technology and to identify processes and guidelines to help the FAA address the shortcomings noted in software dependent procurements. The Committee encourages the FAA to conduct an indepth analysis of the processes within the FAA which are affected by COTS/NDI technologies, identify new methods to test and validate safety-critical systems that are not dependent on source code analysis, investigate ways to reduce cost and time to establish high confidence in a system. Establishment of a center is an activity better considered in the context of the fiscal year 2000 appropriations bill. WEATHER Objectives: To improve the timeliness and accuracy of weather forecasting in order to enhance flight safety, increase system capacity, improve flight efficiency, reduce air traffic control [ATC] and pilot workload, improve flight planning, and increase productivity. The Committee recommends $19,284,000 for the weather program, a $7,000,000 increase over the administration's request. This increase reflects the Committee's concern about the impact of weather on aviation safety and the need to continue an aggressive program of research and development. Project Socrates. --The Committee has added $3,000,000 to this program to continue FAA's sensor for optically characterized ring-eddy atmospheric turbulence emanating sound (Project SOCRATES). Project SOCRATES is the only ongoing project in the FAA to develop a new sensor technology aimed at improving air passenger safety by early detection of atmospheric hazards, including wind shear, wake vortex, and clear air turbulence. Juneau, AK .--The Committee has included $4,000,000 for the Juneau turbulence and windshear project. The funding is sufficient to continue the research and to permit the FAA to purchase the wind profilers and anemometers at the airport. The preliminary results of the research indicate that this may be a technology and approach that is transferable to other similarly situated airports with critical approach patterns and severe wind conditions. The Committee urges the FAA to integrate this project into current operational procedures as soon as the research data warrants and the operational benefits can be realized. AIRCRAFT SAFETY TECHNOLOGY Objectives: To develop technologies, standards, and maintenance regulations that maintain or improve aircraft safety in an evolving, changing, and demanding aviation environment. Aging aircraft .--The Committee has provided $21,540,000 for FAA's research in the aging aircraft area, $6,846,000 more than the administration's request. This research supports airborne data monitoring systems, corrosion fatigue research, the Center for Aviation Systems Reliability [CASR], and the Aging Aircraft Nondestructive Inspection Validation Center [AANC], which conducts research in these areas. The Committee is concerned that the administration's request for this line item would hold aging aircraft research at a no-growth posture, which would severely strain the aging aircraft program. The administration request does not follow through on the recent Gore Commission report recommending that the aging aircraft program be increased to cover nonstructural systems. The Committee recommendation includes $3,000,000 for direct support of the AANC's work. Further, the Committee directs the FAA to explore the options of building a new hanger for AANC or modifying the existing hanger at Albuquerque airport. The FAA should report back to the Committee on the results of this exploration by January 15, 1999. Of the request level, the Committee expects $1,000,000 to be available for aging aircraft-related activities at CASR. The additional funding above the request includes $6,000,000 to support the Airworthiness Assurance Center of Excellence, which the FAA is forming to integrate inspection, crashworthiness, and advanced materials research efforts of university programs with the validation efforts of the AANC. This center will work with industry in a comprehensive effort to improve the safety of aging aircraft. Of the total funds provided, the Committee directs that $4,440,000 be used to further the engine titanium inspection component of this line item. SYSTEM SECURITY TECHNOLOGY Objectives: To enhance the security of passengers and crews in all aspects of aircraft, airports, and related ATC facilities by developing systems that prevent or deter terrorist activities. Explosives and weapons detection .--The Committee has provided $42,200,000 for the explosives and weapons detection line item. This activity is used to conduct research in trace and bulk detection of explosives and cargo screening. This is consistent with the administration's request adjusted for the resources reprogrammed prior to the beginning of this fiscal year. Of the funds provided, the Committee directs $4,000,000 to the pulsed fast neutron analysis cargo inspection system [CIS] for an operational field demonstration by the Federal Aviation Administration at an airport; $6,000,000 for the continuation of the research into the pulsed fast neutron transmission spectroscopy [PFNTS]; $1,000,000 to accelerate research and development of explosives and chemical or biological agents currently being conducted by the Insititute of Biological Detection Systems; and $1,000,000 for exploration of x-ray scanning technology which incorporates combined automatic organic detection and software based threat image projection testing capabilities. The Committee believes that FAA's R,E&D efforts to identify and develop alternative technologies continue to be very important. The funds provided are sufficient to continue research and development efforts in this area and to explore the most promising new technologies. Airport security technology integration .--The Committee recommends $3,941,000 for this activity, an increase of $1,456,000 over the fiscal year 1998 appropriation. Aircraft hardening .--The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for this activity, the level appropriated in fiscal year 1998. HUMAN FACTORS AND AVIATION MEDICINE Objectives: To establish ways to improve the effectiveness of human performance in the operation of the aviation system and to seek better methods for preventing human error, accidents, and incidents. The Committee recommends full funding of the request. Aeromedical research. --The Committee directs the FAA to report on the utility of a multiperson hyperbaric chamber and attendant supporting research and evaluation equipment to the goals of the aeromedical research program. ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY Objectives: To protect the environment, conserve energy, and keep the U.S. air transportation industry strong and competitive. The Committee recommends $2,891,000, the level appropriated in fiscal year 1998. INNOVATIVE/COOPERATIVE RESEARCH Objectives: To maximize the total effectiveness of research, engineering, and development by incorporating the efforts of other Government agencies, the industry, and universities. The Committee recommends $2,000,000, the level appropriated in fiscal year 1998. GRANTS-IN-AID FOR AIRPORTS (Liquidation of Contract Authorization) (Airport and Airway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1998 $1,600,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 1,600,000,000 Committee recommendation 1,600,000,000 The Airport and Airway Improvement Act of 1982, as amended, authorizes a program of grants to fund airport planning and development and noise compatibility planning and projects for public use airports in all States and territories. The Committee recommends $1,600,000,000 in liquidating cash for grants-in-aid for airports. This is consistent with the Committee's obligation limitation on airport grants for fiscal year 1999 and for the payment of previous years' obligations. (Limitation on Obligations) Limitation, 1998 $1,700,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 1,700,000,000 Committee recommendation 2,100,000,000 The bill also includes a limitation on obligations for airport development and planning grants which are financed under contract authority. The limitation recommended for fiscal year 1999 is $2,100,000,000 and is intended to be sufficient to continue the important tasks of enhancing airport safety, ensuring that airport standards can be met, maintaining existing airport capacity, and developing additional capacity. The level that the Committee has proposed will mean more money for airports in all the States as compared to the administration's budget request. The table below shows estimates of the entitlement and State allocation grant funds that each State would receive under the Committee recommendation. This does not include discretionary funds, which would also be greater under the Committee recommendation. Airport Improvement Program formula distributions [Estimated fiscal year 1998 entitlement and State allocations] Total formula funds State at $2,100,000,000 Alabama $5,823,950 Alaska 31,277,460 Arizona 8,759,576 Arkansas 4,577,601 California 31,086,667 Colorado 7,958,160 Connecticut 2,809,935 Delaware 635,295 District of Columbia 468,506 Florida 13,064,255 Georgia 8,040,687 Hawaii 1,186,786 Idaho 5,134,047 Illinois 11,777,613 Indiana 6,148,104 Iowa 5,065,177 Kansas 6,193,550 Kentucky 4,932,788 Louisiana 5,778,788 Maine 2,734,919 Maryland 4,298,977 Massachusetts 5,091,338 Michigan 12,190,141 Minnesota 7,873,545 Mississippi 4,490,016 Missouri 7,558,689 Montana 8,289,328 Nebraska 5,247,768 Nevada 6,692,991 New Hampshire 1,334,174 New Jersey 6,348,164 New Mexico 7,508,916 New York 16,573,616 North Carolina 7,827,567 North Dakota 4,180,667 Ohio 10,647,533 Oklahoma 6,061,992 Oregon 7,247,957 Pennsylvania 11,505,588 Puerto Rico 2,632,148 Rhode Island 832,693 South Carolina 4,302,524 South Dakota 4,559,359 Tennessee 5,936,395 Texas 26,942,447 Utah 5,752,302 Vermont 933,033 Virginia 6,947,024 Washington 7,410,694 West Virginia 2,638,950 Wisconsin 7,204,305 Wyoming 5,421,196 Insular areas 2,564,100 388,500,000 Note .--States allocation includes: General aviation, reliever, and nonprimary commercial service airports and is based on 1997 distribution. Entitlement funds are those distributed to commercial service airports based on enplanements. Estimates are based on 1996 enplanements. The Committee notes that a sizable alternative source of funding is now available to airports in the form of passenger facility charges [PFC's]. The first PFC charge began for airlines tickets issued on June 1, 1992. DOT data shows that as of March 1, 1998, 289 airports have been approved for collection of PFC's in the amount of $18,100,000,000. During calendar year 1997 it is estimated that airports collected $1,222,745,000 in PFC charges and $1,258,000,000 is estimated to be collected in calendar year 1998. Of the airports collecting PFC's, approximately one-fifth collected about 85 percent of the total, and all of these are either large or medium hub airports. DOT estimates that these airports will collect more than $1,157,000,000 in calendar year 1999, depending on the number of applications received and approved. While large hubs collected most of the PFC funds during the last 2 years, small airports also partially benefited from these collections because of the redistribution mechanism in the PFC legislation. According to the provision, an airport collecting PFC's must have its apportionment under the AIP grant program reduced by 50 percent of the forecast PFC revenue, but the reduction cannot be more than one-half of the airport's earned apportionment for that fiscal year. FAA then redistributes these returned trust funds primarily to small airports. For example, in fiscal 1998 $111,300,000 that would have been distributed as grants based on passenger enplanements to PFC-charging airports is being redistributed to small airports. In redistributing these funds, FAA provides three-quarters of the total to the small airport fund, another 12.5 percent is available to small hubs, and the remaining 12.5 percent goes to FAA's discretionary account that can be provided to small, medium, or large airports. AIP FUNDING FOR FISCAL YEAR 1999 Budget estimate\1\ Committee recommendation\1\ Appropriation limitation $1,700,000,000 $2,100,000,000 Entitlements: 527,949,003 527,949,003 -------------------- ----------------------------- Subtotal entitlements 995,621,560 1,079,621,560 ==================== ============================= Returned entitlements: Small airport fund 113,767,800 113,767,800 Discretionary set-asides: 211,054,936 225,000,000 Other discretionary: 210,779,025 405,162,776 -------------------- ----------------------------- Subtotal other discretionary 300,000,000 559,178,335 ==================== ============================= Total entitlement 1,109,389,360 1,193,389,360 Total discretionary 590,610,640 906,610,640 -------------------- ----------------------------- Grand total 1,700,000,000 2,100,000,000 \1\Assumes current law pending AIP program reauthorization with continuation of MAP and noise levels at fiscal year 1998 levels. DISCRETIONARY GRANTS As the table above illustrates, at a level of $2,100,000,000 for the total AIP program, as recommended by the Committee, there are $906,610,000 in discretionary funds. At this level, the authorization legislation causes a transfer from the other discretionary programs--specifically, the discretionary account for capacity, safety, security, and noise and the remaining discretionary funds, which are critical in meeting commitments under letters of intent and advancing projects that have systemwide benefits--to the set-asides for noise, the military airport program, and a set-aside for general aviation, reliever, and nonprimary commercial airports. The latter category provides additional funds for airports that are most dependent on Federal assistance to make safety and capacity improvements. At the recommended levels for the total AIP program under the prior AIP authorization, a transfer normally would have occurred from the other discretionary programs--specifically, the discretionary account for capacity, safety, security, and noise and the remaining discretionary funds, which are critical in meeting commitments under letters of intent and advancing projects that have systemwide benefits--to the set-asides for noise, the military airport program, and a set-aside for general aviation, reliever, and nonprimary commercial airports. The latter category provides additional funds for airports that are most dependent on Federal assistance to make safety and capacity improvements. But, without caps, the set-asides for noise and the military airport program would increase to more than $377,000,000 and $132,000,000, respectively. In the Committee's judgment, a cap on the transfer to these two set-asides would result in a better allocation of resources to meet the airport capital investment needs that most impact air travelers today. Therefore, the Committee has recommended bill language that caps the noise set-aside at $225,000,000, and the military airport set-aside at $26,000,000. The Committee has carefully considered a broad array of discretionary grant requests that can be expected in fiscal year 1999. The Committee expects the Administrator to give great deference to the Committee's recommendations for discretionary grants in fiscal year 1999. Specifically, the Committee expects the FAA to give priority consideration to grant applications for the projects listed below in the categories of discretionary grants for which they are eligible. If funds in the remaining discretionary category are used for any projects in fiscal year 1999 that are not listed below, the Committee expects that they will be for projects for which FAA has issued letters of intent (including letters of intent the Committee recommends below that the FAA subsequently issues), or for projects that will produce significant aviation safety improvements or significant improvements in systemwide capacity or otherwise have a very high benefit/cost ratio. Within the obligation level recommended, the Committee directs that priority be given to grant applications involving the further development of the following airports: Albuquerque International Sunport, NM Allen C. Thompson Field, MS Anaconda Airport, MT Anchorage International Airport, AK Ann Arbor Municipal Airport, MI Birmingham International Airport, AL Bishop Airport, MI Bismarck Municipal Airport, ND Brunswick County Airport, NC Burlington-Alamance Regional Airport, NC Burns Airport, OR Butler County Airport, PA Capital City Airport, MI Chautauqua/Jamestown Airport, NY Chicago Midway Airport, IL Chignik Lagoon Airport, AK Clarence E. Hancock Airport, NY Clarks Point Airport, AK Colorado Springs Airport, CO Concord Regional Airport, NC Creve Coeur Airport, MO Dane County Regional Airport, WI Deer Lodge Airport, MT Erie International Airport, PA Eufaula Airport, AL Fairbanks International Airport, AK Felts Field Airport, WA General Carl A. Spatz Airport, PA Global Transpark, NC Golden Triangle Regional Airport, MS Grand Rapids, Kent County Airport, MI Greater Baton Rouge Airport, LA Greensboro-High Point-Winston Regional Airport, NC Halifax County, NC Hays Municipal Airport, KS Helena Regional Airport, MT Huntsville International Airport, AL Jackson International Airport, MS Kahului International Airport, HI Karluk Airport, AK Kent County Airport, MI Lacrosse Municipal Airport, WI Lansing Capital City Airport, MI Lancaster Airport, PA Lee Summit Municipal Airport, MO Madison County Airport, AL Manistee County-Blacker Airport, MI March Joint Use Airport, CA Miami International Airport, FL Midway Airport, IL Moore County Airport, NC New Orleans International Airport, LA Newport State Airport, VT Niagara Falls International Airport, NY Nikola Airport, AK Northwest Alabama Regional Airport, AL Oakland County International Airport, MI Olive Branch Airport, MS Pangborn Field, WA Peachtree De Kalb County Airport, GA Peterson Field, CO Philadelphia International Airport, PA Philadelphia Airport, MS Piedmont-Triad International Airport, NC Pittsburgh International Airport, PA Paine Field Airport, WA Reading Airport, PA Republic Airport, NY Rickenbacker International Airport, OH Roswell Industrial Air Center, NM Russian Mission Airport, AK Salt Lake City International Airport, UT San Bernardino Airport (Norton Air Force Base), CA Santa Barbara Airport, CA Schaumburg Regional Airport, IL Shelby County Airport, AL Sheldon Point Airport, AK Siletz Bay Airport, OR Spokane International Airport, WA Stanly County Airport, NC Stennis Airport, MS Syracuse-Hancock International Airport, NY Traverse City Cherry Capital Airport, MI University Airport, MS W.K. Kellogg Regional Airfield, MI Waynesboro Airport, MS Westchester County Airport, NY Westmoreland/Latrobe County Airport, PA Williamsport-Lycoming County Airport, PA Wilmington International Airport, NC Clayton Municipal Airport/Abbeville Airport, AL .--The Committee directs the FAA to work with interested airport authority officials at both these airports to determine the eligibility of these airports for inclusion in the national plan of integrated airport systems [NPIAS]. Greater Baton Rouge Airport district, Louisiana .--The Committee urges the FAA to give priority consideration to requests for discretionary funding to support continuation of the airport's improvement program, including the reconstruction of existing taxiways, the relocation of an electrical vault, the acquisition of an aviation easement for an existing runway, and to mitigate the remaining homes and churches in the airport's noise mitigation program. Helena Regional Airport .--The Committee is concerned by the flow of traffic between runways and aircraft staging areas at Helena Regional Airport. The airport has requested funding for an exit taxiway that would permit aircraft not to have to cross the active main runway at the airport midpoint in order to utilize the south parallel taxiway. In addition, there is a line-of-sight correction project that the Committee is aware that the FAA is working with the airport to resolve. The Committee urges the FAA to give priority consideration to correcting the line-of-sight problem and to include the full length of taxiway ``F'' in the project in order to facilitate the safe movement of aircraft around the airport. Gulf Coast Regional Airport .--The Committee is aware of efforts to develop a regional airport to serve the southern gulf coast region. The Committee directs the FAA to study the feasibility of such a regional airport and to work with the University of West Florida and the University of South Alabama for the research, the necessary demographic projections, and an assessment of the economic impact of a gulf coast regional airport located between Mobile, AL, and Pensacola, FL. Kahului Airport, HI .--The Committee understands the State of Hawaii will soon file an application for a discretionary grant to strengthen and extend the Kahului Airport runway in Maui, HI. The application, however, is pending the issuance of a record of decision [ROD] on the EIS associated with the extension of the runway, which was approved by the FAA regional office more than 7 months ago. The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to issuance of the ROD associated with this project and, further, provide priority consideration for the strengthening and extension project. Mesquite Airport, NV .--The Committee is aware that the Clark County, NV, Department of Aviation is conducting a site selection, airport master plan, and an environmental assessment for a regional commercial airport to be located near Mesquite, NV. The Committee directs the FAA to give priority consideration to requests for discretionary funding to complete these studies. New Orleans International Airport .--The Committee reiterates the priority consideration placed on the new parallel north/south runway from prior appropriations acts for completion of the environmental impact statement and initial land acquisition to meet the growing needs of this region. Philadelphia Airport, MS. --Due to rapid economic development in east-central Mississippi, a project to extend the runway at the Philadelphia, MS, Airport should be given high priority by the Federal Aviation Administration. The Committee directs that the FAA conduct an immediate assessment of air operations at the airport which will count all air operations and commitments for such operations, including resort-related charter commitments, on an equal basis in determining the eligibility for funding of the project to extend the airport runway. 2002 Olympic general aviation airports, Utah .--The 2002 Winter Olympic Games will place significant additional demand on the Salt Lake City metropolitan airports system. The Olympic aviation system plan, being developed by various local and State planning agencies in conjunction with the FAA and the Salt Lake Olympic Organizing Committee, has identified four key general aviation airports (Ogden, Provo, Tooele Valley, and Heber), which will serve over 65 percent of the general aviation demand during the Olympics. The Utah Statewide Capital Improvement Program, prepared in cooperation with the FAA's airport division, has identified projects at these airports which have a high national priority and are necessary for these airports during the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The Committee urges the FAA to give priority consideration to request for discretionary funding for these necessary capital improvements. Schaumburg Regional Airport, IL .--The Committee commends to the FAA's attention the growing need for a debt retirement plan for the Schaumburg Regional Airport. The village of Schaumburg, at the urging of the FAA, purchased the Schaumburg Air Park in 1994 and has converted it into a first-class, regional general aviation facility. Therefore, the Committee recommends the FAA give priority consideration to discretionary funds for retirement of the outstanding principal balance. LETTERS OF INTENT Congress authorized FAA to use letters of intent [LOI's] to fund multiyear airport improvement projects that will significantly enhance systemwide airport capacity. FAA is also to consider a project's benefits and costs in determining whether to approve it for AIP funding. FAA adopted a policy of committing to LOI's no more than about 50 percent of forecasted AIP discretionary funds allocated for capacity, safety, security, and noise projects. The Committee viewed this policy as reasonable because it gave FAA the flexibility to fund other worthy projects that do not fall under a LOI. Both FAA and airport authorities have found letters of intent helpful in planning and funding airport development. The Committee appreciates the complexity of assessing a project's impact on systemwide capacity but believes that FAA should do its best in this regard before committing future AIP funds under a LOI. The Committee in the past was concerned that FAA had not exercised sufficient control over the use of LOI's. Accordingly, to maintain program integrity and ensure LOI commitments are met, the Committee repeats its recommendation, as Congress reauthorizes this program, that FAA be granted the authority to award new LOI's only after scheduled and recommended LOI payments fall to less than 50 percent of AIP discretionary funds. Current letters of intent assume the following fiscal year 1999 grant allocations: Arkansas: Fayetteville (northwest Arkansas) $5,000,000 Colorado: Denver International 24,931,000 Georgia: Hartsfield Atlanta International 7,083,000 Illinois: 14,000,000 3,000,000 Kentucky: 6,000,000 18,243,000 Michigan: Detroit Metropolitan 16,400,000 Mississippi: Golden Triangle 300,000 Nevada: Reno/Tahoe International 6,500,000 New York: Buffalo International 1,700,000 Rhode Island: Theodore F. Green State 6,500,000 South Carolina: 558,000 94,000 Tennessee: 555,000 18,733,000 Texas: 11,430,000 12,500,000 1,327,000 Virginia: Reagan Washington National 14,232,000 Washington: Seattle-Tacoma International 4,400,000 173,486,000 Under current law, two sources exist to fund FAA's commitment to an airport's LOI. One is the discretionary portion of FAA's airport improvement program appropriation, and the other is the entitlement funding that an airport receives through the AIP on the basis of its passenger enplanements. Even though FAA expects an airport receiving an LOI to put all of its entitlement funding toward the project being funded by the LOI, this source provides only about one-quarter of the annual LOI funding. Thus, of the $173,486,000 that FAA has committed to LOI's during fiscal year 1999, the Committee estimates that approximately $131,300,000 will need to come from the AIP's discretionary limitation. As shown in the preceding AIP funding chart, the Committee recommended level would provide sufficient discretionary funding to cover LOI's. Applications are pending for capacity enhancement projects which would, if constructed, significantly reduce congestion and delay. These projects require multiyear funding commitments. The Committee recommends that the FAA enter into letters of intent for multiyear funding of such capacity enhancement projects. Salt Lake City International Airport, UT .--The Salt Lake City International Airport has been one of the fastest growing local origin and destination travel airports in the Nation. The airport has experienced significant growth for 17 consecutive years. SLCIA is the only primary commercial service airport in the region and will serve as the gateway for most Olympic visitors during the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The Salt Lake City Airport Authority has planned airport terminal expansion and modernization projects to meet both short-term demand and future needs. The Committee urges the FAA to give full and immediate consideration to the SLCIA application for a letter of intent. Anchorage International Airport, AK .--The Anchorage International Airport is one of the fastest growing passenger and cargo airports in the country and provides a unique mix of international, rural, hub, military, and point-to-point aviation operations. The massive growth in enplanements and cargo tonnage has been accommodated with a minimum of infrastructure improvements. The Committee urges the FAA to give full and immediate consideration to the Anchorage International Airport application for a letter of intent. Orlando International Airport, FL .--The Committee encourages the FAA to give full and immediate consideration to the Greater Orlando Aviation Authority's application for a letter of intent for construction of a north crossfield taxiway connecting the two west runways (18L/36R and 18R/36L) with the existing east runway. The Committee is informed that substantial safety and capacity benefits will accrue from the completion of this project. FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION SUMMARY OF FISCAL YEAR 1999 PROGRAM The principal missions of the Federal Highway Administration are: administration, in cooperation with the States, of the Federal-aid highway program; regulation and enforcement of Federal requirements relating to the safety of operation and equipment of commercial motor carriers engaged in interstate or foreign commerce; and governance of the safety in movement over the Nation's highways of dangerous cargoes such as explosives, flammables, and other hazardous materials. Under the Committee recommendations, a total program level of $27,018,903,000 would be provided for the activities of the Federal Highway Administration in fiscal year 1999. The following table summarizes the fiscal year 1998 program levels, the fiscal year 1999 program request and the Committee's recommendations: [In thousands of dollars] Program Fiscal year-- Committee recommendation 1998 program level 1999 budget estimate Appalachian development highway system\1\ 300,000 200,000 Federal-aid highways\2\\3\ 21,500,000 21,500,000 25,511,000 Office of Motor Carrier Administrative expenses\6\ (51,000) (55,383) (53,375) Exempt Federal-aid obligations 1,597,851 1,265,143 1,207,903 Emergency relief supplemental 259,000 State infrastructure banks 150,000 Transportation Infrastructure credit enhancement 100,000 Motor carrier safety 84,825 100,000 100,000 -------------------- ---------------------- ------------ Total 23,741,676 23,115,143 27,018,903 \1\The administration proposed $200,000,000 for fiscal year 1998, and $290,000,000 for fiscal year 1999 in contract authority for this program under Federal-aid highways as part of ISTEA reauthorization. \2\Excludes reduction for TASC pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66. \3\Obligation limitation on contract authority. \4\Includes funding for research and technology programs. \5\Does not include research and technology programs funded with contract authority. \6\Included within limitation on administrative expenses. LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES Appropriations, 1998\1\ $552,266,000 Budget estimate, 1999\2\ 325,421,000 Committee recommendation\2\ 320,413,000 \1\Excludes reduction for TASC pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66. Includes funding for research and technology programs. \2\Does not include funding for research and technology programs funded with contract authority. The limitation on administrative expenses controls spending for virtually all the salaries and expenses of the Federal Highway Administration. Under the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, the limitation on general operating expenses included funding for research activities, including intelligent transportation systems. The Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century changed the funding source for the highway research accounts from the administrative takedown of the Federal-Aid Highway Program to individual contract authority provisions. The following table reflects the fiscal year 1998 level, the level requested by the administration, and the Committee's recommendation: [In thousands of dollars] Program Fiscal year-- Committee recommendation 1998 level 1999 budget estimate Administrative expenses (except OMC): 180,065 184,130 184,130 ------------ ---------------------- --------- Subtotal 259,558 270,038 267,038 ============ ====================== ========= Motor carrier safety administrative expenses: 40,700 41,280 41,280 ------------ ---------------------- --------- Subtotal 51,000 55,383 53,375 ============ ====================== ========= Total 310,558 325,421 320,413 Administrative expenses. --The Committee recommends a reduction of $3,000,000 in administrative expenses and provides FHWA the flexibility to allocate that reduction among such expenses as ADP, permanent change of station, travel, transportation, and nonmandatory bonuses and incentives. The Committee notes that FHWA requested roughly $12,000,000 in increases of nonsalary administrative expenses. The Committee has also included language to require the FHWA to transfer $3,000,000 to the Appalachian Regional Commission for the administrative costs associated with the Appalachian development highway system, as requested by the administration. Motor carrier operations .--The Committee recommends $53,375,000 for motor carrier operations. This is an increase of $2,375,000 over the enacted 1998 level, but $2,008,000 less than requested. At this level, salaries and benefits, printing, supplies, and equipment are fully funded. Travel, transportation, and other service programs were held to a lower rate of growth. FEDERAL-AID HIGHWAYS (Liquidation of Contract Authorization) (Highway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1998 $20,800,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 23,000,000,000 24,000,000,000 This activity comprises the majority of all federally aided programs through which the States are financially and technically aided to continue a national highway system that meets the transportation needs of the Nation in terms of capacity and safety. All programs included within the Federal-aid account are financed from the highway trust fund. Authorizations in the form of contract authority are enacted in substantive legislation. These authorizations are apportioned and/or allocated to the States and generally remain available for obligation over a 4-year period. Liquidating cash appropriations are subsequently requested to fund outlays resulting from obligations incurred under contract authority. The Committee recommends a liquidating cash appropriation of $24,000,000,000 for the Federal-aid highways program. FEDERAL-AID HIGHWAYS (Limitation on Obligations) (Highway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1998\1\ $21,500,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 21,500,000,000 Committee recommendation 25,511,000,000 \1\Excludes reduction for TASC pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66. The Committee has provided an obligation limitation of $25,511,000,000 for the Federal-aid highway program for fiscal year 1999. The following table shows the estimated amount each State will receive in Federal-aid highway funds for fiscal year 1999: Federal-aid highway funds States Amount Alabama $437,353,306 Alaska 252,320,041 Arizona 344,931,488 Arkansas 282,579,790 California 1,991,755,320 Colorado 259,578,089 Connecticut 323,124,550 Delaware 99,379,774 District of Columbia 87,500,316 Florida 1,000,449,443 Georgia 754,962,181 Hawaii 111,163,793 Idaho 159,169,262 Illinois 725,721,558 Indiana 506,152,008 Iowa 261,973,826 Kansas 255,167,363 Kentucky 375,665,177 Louisiana 338,954,945 Maine 115,063,711 Maryland 327,736,090 Massachusetts 403,582,854 Michigan 675,089,120 Minnesota 319,764,565 Mississippi 263,410,883 Missouri 507,923,396 Montana 220,718,067 Nebraska 175,808,636 Nevada 158,367,488 New Hampshire 109,009,011 New Jersey 554,254,802 New Mexico 213,589,362 New York 1,099,208,782 North Carolina 611,178,278 North Dakota 147,048,006 Ohio 739,155,849 Oklahoma 337,184,137 Oregon 259,884,779 Pennsylvania 1,051,222,087 Rhode Island 131,222,264 South Carolina 348,091,802 South Dakota 155,040,095 Tennessee 489,038,856 Texas 1,569,977,644 Utah 168,272,822 Vermont 101,608,486 Virginia 556,710,098 Washington 383,048,289 West Virginia 237,063,277 Wisconsin 428,463,250 Wyoming 155,569,193 21,581,208,209 Special limitation: 1,271,395,575 68,175,000 2,590,221,216 25,511,000,000 Star landing highway/rail enhancement, Desoto County, MS.-- For the purpose of constructing an underpass to improve access and enhance highway/rail safety and economic development along Star Landing Road in Desoto County, MS, the State of Mississippi may use funds previously allocated to it under the transportation enhancements program, provided that the State would otherwise be unable to use the funds for transportation enhancement projects consistent with current law. INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS) The Committee recommends a total limitation of $200,000,000 to be distributed as follows: [In thousands of dollars] Budget estimate, 1999 Committee recommendation Intelligent transportation systems: 58,600 38,000 ----------------------- -------------------------- Total, ITS 250,000 200,000 ITS deployment projects .--The Committee action provides a limitation of $105,000,000 for ITS deployment projects. The funds provided are for deployment projects in the areas listed below. The amounts associated with each area represent the minimum amount such area shall receive. Committee ITS deployment projects recommendation Atlanta, GA $4,000,000 Brandon, VT 750,000 Buffalo, NY 1,750,000 Columbus, OH 2,000,000 Corpus Christi, TX 900,000 Delaware River, PA 4,000,000 Huntington Beach, CA 1,000,000 Jackson, MS 4,000,000 Kansas City, MO 1,000,000 Missouri rural ITS 1,000,000 Mobile, AL 5,000,000 Monroe County, NY 1,000,000 Montgomery, AL 2,500,000 Nashville, TN 1,000,000 New York/Long Island, NY 5,000,000 Onondaga County, NY, rural ITS 1,000,000 Raleigh-Wake County, NC 4,000,000 Riverside, CA 1,000,000 Spokane, WA 900,000 St. Louis, MO 1,500,000 State of Alaska 3,000,000 State of Idaho 1,000,000 State of Maryland 2,000,000 State of Michigan 2,000,000 State of Montana 2,000,000 State of Nevada 1,150,000 State of New Jersey 6,000,000 State of New Mexico 2,000,000 State of North Dakota 1,450,000 State of Pennsylvania 4,000,000 State of Texas 2,000,000 State of Utah 7,200,000 State of Washington 3,000,000 State of Wisconsin 3,000,000 Westchester and Putnam Counties, NY 1,000,000 Intelligent vehicle initiative [IVI] .--The Committee urges the Director of the Joint Program Office to ensure that the primary Federal role in the IVI is focused on expediting the innovation of integrated crash avoidance technologies for passenger vehicles. In view of the substantial human factors research, performance specification work, crash avoidance and information systems integration, and cost/benefit assessment work that remains to be completed, an IVI program focused on those critical safety issues is of foremost importance. Such activities as automation of transit vehicles, snow removal systems, and other highway maintenance vehicles and research on nonsafety components of the IVI shall receive a much lower priority than critical safety objectives. Evaluation .--The Committee recommends $7,000,000 for program evaluation studies and recognizes the importance of continuing to evaluate the benefits and costs of various ITS projects and tracking progress on those projects. Architecture and standards .--The Committee recommends $18,000,000, for architecture and standards work. Mainstreaming .--The Committee believes that the Department is spending too much of scarce ITS resources trying to convince planners, the engineering community, and others of the benefits of ITS. There is substantial literature documenting the benefits of using ITS; numerous training courses and programs are well underway; and the ITS concept is beginning to be mainstreamed in the transportation community. Consequently, the Committee's allowance deletes funds for grass roots involvement ( -$535,000), eliminates funds for cooperation with transit companies ( -$350,000), and reduces funds for commercial vehicle operations mainstreaming to no more than $500,000. The Committee also reduces funds for planning/policy mainstreaming activities to less than $1,000,000 and denies funds to establish the role of ITS in supporting FHWA/FTA mobility goals. The Committee also denies funds for ITS awareness and advocacy ( -$2,000,000). Publication funds should be included as an integral part of related activities. Remaining mainstreaming funds shall be used to provide technical assistance on the planning, procurement, and implementation of integrated ITS technologies, offer guidance on the use of the national architecture, and supplement critical training not available from the private sector or universities. Transportation Research and Development (Limitation on Obligations) The Committee recommends a total limitation of $178,150,000 on research and development activities. These funds shall be distributed as follows: Surface transportation research: $65,000,000 14,000,000 7,500,000 10,000,000 500,000 97,000,000 Technology deployment program 35,000,000 Training and education 15,000,000 University transportation research 31,150,000 178,150,000 National advanced driving simulator [NADS] .--Within the funds available for research and development, the Committee directs that $9,000,000 be for the NADS. NADS is a key element of crash avoidance research and will serve as a helpful tool for evaluating various ITS and other collision avoidance products. This new driving simulator will enhance the agency's capability to safely conduct research into complex driver-vehicle interactions that contribute directly to the cause of more than three-quarters of all vehicle crashes. The NADS will be installed in a dedicated building being constructed at the University of Iowa's Oakdale Research Park. Alabama Transportation Research Institute .--The Committee is aware of the current and planned research activities being conducted at the University of Alabama's Transportation Research Institute [ATRI] in Tuscaloosa, AL. In particular, these activities include research into advanced vehicle technologies, intelligent transportation systems, and computer-based highway safety data systems. The ATRI is to be commended for the foresight evidenced by the research in these specific areas, and in the applications of new technology to ATRI's work and the integration of Internet access. Further, the Committee applauds the aggressive and ambitious plans the university and the ATRI have for expanding the research and facilities dedicated to this initiatives, and directs the Secretary to utilize the strengths of the Alabama Transportation Research Institute as the Department carries out transportation research and development activities, including intelligent transportation system research. Highway Research and Development The Committee recommends the following allocation of highway research and development contract program funds: [In thousands of dollars] 1998 program 1999 estimate 1999 recommendation Safety 9,500 11,202 12,835 Pavements 10,500 11,150 15,000 Structures 15,256 15,256 17,000 Environment 5,666 6,352 5,000 Real estate services 365 365 365 Policy 5,400 6,362 4,400 Planning 7,000 9,369 4,000 Motor carrier 7,400 8,652 6,400 Highway operations 2,000 -------------- --------------- --------------------- Total 61,087 70,708 65,000 Within the appropriate research areas, FHWA is directed to fund each of the research activities or programs specified in various sections of TEA21. Within the funds available for transportation research and development, the Committee directs that $500,000 be made available pursuant to section 5118 of TEA21 for infrastructure research conducted by the Drexel University Intelligent Infrastructure Institute. Safety .--The Committee recommends $12,835,000 for safety research and development activities. The Committee supports research and demonstration activities to advance technology combining the use of UV lights and flourescent materials to improve night time visibility, to help identify lane markings and pedestrians at night. Because of the substantial benefits that might be realized as a result of that technology, FHWA should accelerate that initiative as expeditiously as possible. Work zone safety. --More than 700 people are killed and 5,000 injured each year in accidents that occur in road construction sites across the Nation. That figure is anticipated to rise as an ever-increasing amount of road work is done under traffic and at night. Driver awareness of potential work zone hazards is an important element of increasing safety in this area. Of the funds provided in the safety research account, the Committee directs that $1,000,000 be used to educate new drivers on the special challenges and potential dangers of road construction work zones by developing and distributing a multimedia driver training program module on this subject. The Committee encourages the FHWA to work with a national nonprofit transportation development foundation to carry out this project. Pavements .--The Committee recommends $15,000,000 for pavements research. The Committee is encouraged by the potential benefits for highway construction--including lower construction and maintenance costs, higher riding quality, and a longer life-cycle of new and reconstructed highways--resulting from the use of geosynthetic materials. Therefore, the Committee has included $1,000,000 for geosynthetic material research at the Western Transportation Institute at Montana State University. The Committee also directs FHWA to conduct further research into polymer additives for pavements. The Committee is aware that recent performance measurements have shown in various limited applications to increase the expected life of asphalt pavement. Therefore, the Committee has included $3,000,000 to conduct extensive research into this area. Of this amount, $1,000,000 shall be for the development and deployment of a second generation FRP composite bridge deck system at the University of West Virginia. Further, the Committee encourages the FHWA to work with an academic and industry-led national consortium and fund with available balances, an additional polymer additive project to demonstrate the use of polymer additives in pavement for civil infrastructure purposes. The Committee is aware of the Federal Highway Administration's pavement design analysis work that utilizes the fundamental properties of the various pavement materials, analytical packing algorithms and granular mechanics, coupled with state-of-the-art imaging techniques and computational modeling and builds on the work performed at the University of Mississippi. The Committee directs the FHWA to continue to cooperate and work with the researchers there to develop concepts and technologies that will lead to better constructed and longer lasting high quality pavements. The Committee recognizes the potential for the use of silica fume to decrease the national waste material stream and increase the durability and quality of concrete structures and pavement. Within the funds provided, the Committee directs that $1,000,000 be used to evaluate and promote the benefits of using silica fume high performance concrete, and that the Administrator of the FHWA report on its findings to the Committee no later than September 30, 2001. The Committee directs the Administrator to work with a representative national organization of the silica fume industry to carry out this project. Structures .--The Committee recommends $17,000,000 for structures research. The Committee believes that a unique opportunity to conduct research exists during the Interstate 15 reconstruction project and other transportation projects in the Salt Lake Valley, UT. The research performed during the reconstruction of I 15 and other projects will provide the country with a detailed analysis of the load capacities of deteriorated bridge structures, seismic retrofitting, new nondestructive evaluation techniques, and many other valuable areas of research. The Committee has included an additional $2,000,000 for this research and because of the urgency of this research, directs the FHWA to make these funds available to the Utah Department of Transportation and the Utah Transportation Center in a timely manner to ensure the execution of this research. The Committee is aware of the University of Missouri-Rolla's leading role in exploring the use of advanced composites for repair and rehabilitation of buildings and civil infrastructure and of the university's current work in the field of advanced composites with a number of private organizations in the State of Missouri, the National Science Foundation, and the Missouri Department of Transportation. The Committee has included $1,000,000 for research at the University of Missouri-Rolla to explore new technologies in advanced composite materials that will help prolong the functional lifespan of bridges and reduce retrofit maintenance costs in the long term. The Committee recognizes that wood composite products have demonstrated tremendous potential as an alternative method of providing low-cost, extremely durable, and environmentally sensitive material for building and repairing bridges across the country. The Committee has, therefore, included $1,000,000 for wood composite research and $1,000,000 for the Innovative Bridge Research and Construction Program at the University of Maine's Wood Composite Center. Currently, bridges over 20 feet must be inspected once every 2 years. This inspection usually consists of a visual check. Although this type of monitoring can detect several structural problems, it cannot detect deterioration or distress that occurs beneath the asphalt. The Committee has included $2,000,000 for the evaluation of new technologies for nondestructive evaluation of bridges and encourages the department to work with recognized industry leaders to carry out this evaluation. The Committee notes that the fiscal year 1998 conference report included funding for research into high performance materials and bridge systems which could be applied to improve safety, function, durability, and renewability with minimal cost and environmental impact. The Committee directs the Administrator to work with Lehigh University, Pennsylvania on this research. Environment .--The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for environmental research. Within that amount, $50,000 is provided to conduct a study to determine noise levels in Rattlesnake Valley near Missoula, MT, and $100,000 is included to conduct a regional air quality study for the San Joaquin Valley in California. Policy .--The Committee recommends $4,400,000 for policy research. The Committee is not convinced of the need to update the national personal transportation survey continuously and FHWA should plan on completing the next edition of that study as soon as practicable. FHWA should develop a work plan being certain to limit the scope and size of the NPTS to essential questions of importance to both the States and the Federal Government users. Fuel tagging. --The Committee is aware that fuel dyeing technology may be insufficient to protect against illegal avoidance of Federal fuel taxes. In addition, the Committee is concerned that fuel dye may inadvertently contaminate other fuels, such as jet fuels, during the refining process and in transport. The Committee, therefore, directs the Administrator of the Federal Highway Administration to report to the House and Senate Appropriations Committees, no later than March 31, 1999, on the viability of existing alternative technology developed through research conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Further, the report should include an examination of other possible uses of molecular tagging, for example, as a deterrent against theft and as a method for determining surface and underground pollution. Planning .--The Committee's allowance includes $4,000,000 for planning research. The Committee is aware that $2,000,000 designated in its fiscal year 1998 report for an assessment of the transportation infrastructure of the Northern Great Plains States has not yet been administered by the FHWA. The Committee restates its support for such an assessment and urges the FHWA to act expeditiously toward its initiation. The Committee also directs the FHWA to provide a report to the Committee on the status of the assessment by October 15, 1998. Motor carrier .--The Committee recommends $6,400,000 for the motor carrier research program. The FHWA budget office is directed to improve the presentation of the budget justification pertaining to this area. Future budget requests should clearly articulate the specific projects that will be funded and the exact amounts that are requested for each of those projects. In addition, baseline funding amounts for both terminating and continuing projects should be specified. The Committee is concerned about several features of the current motor carrier research program. There is a proliferation of at least 100 diffuse research projects that are now being managed by numerous staff. The Office of Motor Carriers should focus the motor carrier research program on those areas that are most likely to make the greatest contribution to its strategic goals and performance measures. The Committee directs FHWA to request the Research and Technology Coordinating Committee of the National Academy of Sciences [NAS] to review the scope and direction of the OMC research program, its organizational framework, diversity of projects, and allocation of funds. The Administrator of the OMC should report back to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations no later than May 1, 1999, on the administration's response to the NAS recommendations. Within the funds provided, the Committee directs the OMC to prepare a report to the House and Senate Appropriations Committees--no later than September 1, 1998--documenting the potential safety advantages of a Federal rule to require a uniform national display policy for inspection stickers on commercial motor vehicles. TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT PROGRAM Center for Advanced System Technology .--The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for the Center for Advanced Simulation Technology, Long Island, NY, of which not less than $500,000 shall be made available to Auburn University for a transportation management program. These funds will be used to develop outreach initiatives involving technology transfer, technical assistance and training related to transportation management, traffic control, and simulation and human factors. CONSTRUCTION OF FERRY BOATS AND FERRY TERMINAL FACILITIES (limitation on obligations) The Committee has provided a limitation on obligations of $38,000,000 for the new construction of ferry boat and ferry terminal facility program. The Committee notes that the authorization of this program reserves $20,000,000 of the total amount for projects within the marine highway system. Within the $18,000,000 not reserved for this purpose, $4,000,000 shall be provided to the North Carolina State ferry system, which is an essential component of the State of North Carolina's hurricane evacuation program. In addition, $3,000,000 shall be provided to the State of Hawaii to initiate a high-speed ferry boat demonstration program on the Island of Oahu and neighbor islands. In addition, $1,000,000 is provided for the restoration of S.S. AEmdbo AF AEmdnm AFNobska AEmdbo AF AEmdnm AF and New Bedford, MA, ferry service. MAGNETIC LEVITATION TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT PROGRAM (Limitation on obligations) (Highway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1998 ........................... Budget estimate, 1999 ........................... Committee recommendation ($15,000,000) Pursuant to section 1218 of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century, $15,000,000 in highway trust funds are made available for obligation in the same manner as if the funds were apportioned under chapter 1 of title 23, U.S.C. Therefore, these funds are within the highway funding firewall established in TEA21 under the Federal-aid highways program obligation ceiling. Within the funds made available under this heading, $6,000,000 is directed to be provided to the State of Pennsylvania for a high-speed intercity magnetic levitation project between Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, that will incorporate an Americanized version of the German Thyssen Transrapid System magnetic levitation train technology. The guideway for the system will be heavy steel plate, presenting the opportunity for market growth in the U.S. precision fabrication industry. The system will be developed for American operational conditions, using American manufacturing methods and materials. The funds provided in this appropriation will support the design and development of: intermodal transportation facilities on the system's right-of-way; right-of-way alignment finalization; a draft environmental impact statement; and magnetic levitation industry standards for communications, control, and power systems. This program will be administered by the Federal Railroad Administration. APPALACHIAN DEVELOPMENT HIGHWAY SYSTEM The Committee has provided $200,000,000 for construction of unfinished segments of the Appalachian development highway system [ADHS]. The ADHS connects largely rural, underdeveloped areas in 13 States. Its completion is critical to the economic development of these often-ignored areas. In many cases, the unfinished segments of the ADHS are high-accident locations in the Appalachian States, so the Committee believes continued construction will have a high payoff in highway safety benefits. The Committee is aware that the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century provided $450,000,000 per year in contract authority over the next 5 years. However, the Federal share of the current cost to complete the Appalachian development highway system is $5,800,000,000. Given the funding schedule in the TEA 21 legislation, and without inflationary increases, it would take at least another 13 years to complete the system, putting the completion date at 46 years from its inception in 1965. Given the hazardous conditions of many of the roads on and around the unfinished segments of the ADHS, and the commitment of the Congress to the people of Appalachia, this delay is unacceptable. The funds provided in this legislation should be viewed as an effort to expedite the completion of the system in a reasonable fashion, and not as a substitute for any funds which may be provided in any other legislation. FEDERAL LANDS highways program The Committee is very concerned with the degree to which funding awards are made on a partisan basis in the Public Lands Program. The General Accounting Office has noted in a draft report that the administration has awarded more projects and total funding to projects in Democratic districts, even though States requested more funds for projects in Republican districts. The Committee directs FHWA to move toward a merit-based approach in funding public lands projects, and to develop specific criteria for the funding of projects under this program. The Secretary shall report to both the House and Senate Appropriations Committees no later than December 1, 1998, with a detailed proposal to address this problem. The Committee urges the Federal Highway Administration to authorize the Montana Department of Transportation to begin construction of a pending four-lane improvement plan of Highway 93 within the Flathead Indian Reservation in northwest Montana. The road is a direct and vital link to support commerce and personal travel for both Indian and non-Indian residents on and off the reservation. The Committee urges the FHWA to reconsider a FHWA record of decision requiring resolution at the State and local level and pursuant to the Treaty of Hellgate (July 16, 1855) and the Upper Missouri Treaty (October 17, 1855) signed by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and to use the authority of the Federal Government pursuant to these treaties to acquire all right-of-way necessary to construct the four lane design. Local, State, tribal, and Federal officials have been negotiating this issue for over 5 years with little resolution and progress. Highway 93 is a direct route from Missoula, MT, providing access to northwest Montana, one of the State's fastest growing regions. The current two-lane configuration of Highway 93 is subject to hazardous traffic scenarios and has resulted in increased accidents and fatalities due to traffic growth patterns of up to 3 percent annually with that number forecasted to increase. The Committee directs the Secretary to make $3,000,000 available under this program for a design study for the construction upgrade to a paved public road standard for 50.4 miles of roadway in southeastern Montana known as Highway 323, located between the communities of Alzada, MT, and Ekalaka, MT. This important project would improve upgrades on lands held in ownership by the Bureau of Land Management (13.71 miles), the Federal Government, and private landowners. The Committee is aware that Highway 323 is a main roadway from southeastern Montana to the north and that all major trade is completed in the community located directly to the north of the southern terminus of this highway. This road provides access to the Bureau of Land Management areas and would provide vital fire safety access. In addition, this roadway provides access to the areas of national interest, including Devil's Tower National Monument and Medicine Rocks State Park, both native American heritage sites. The State of Montana has agreed to match 20 percent of the cost of construction of the roadway. The Committee also directs the Secretary to make available under this heading $3,900,000 for improvements to roadways on Federal lands on the Kenai Peninsula, AK; $4,000,000 for construction and improvements to the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge access road and Soldier Hollow, which is an integral access road for the 2002 Olympics; $200,000 for snow removal activities on Beartooth Highway in Montana; $4,000,000 to continue work on the Baltimore-Washington Parkway; $1,000,000 for restoration and preservation of the historic Columbia River Highway in Oregon; $5,000,000 for Federal lands highways improvements associated with Hanalei National Wildlife Refuge in Haleakala and Hawaii Volcanoes National Parks in Hawaii; and $1,200,000 for repair work to three access roads to the Katmai National Park in Alaska--Lake Camp Road, Valley Road, and Bear Pond Terrace Road, in the Brooks River area. BUREAU OF TRANSPORTATION STATISTICS (limitation on obligations) Appropriations, 1998 ($25,000,000) Budget estimate, 1999 (31,000,000) Committee recommendation (31,000,000) The Bureau of Transportation Statistics [BTS] was established in section 6006 of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act [ISTEA], to compile, analyze, and make accessible information on the Nation's transportation systems, collect information on intermodal transportation, and enhance the quality and effectiveness of the statistical programs of the Department of Transportation. For fiscal year 1999, the Committee recommends a funding level of $31,000,000. BTS offices include the Director, Statistical Programs and Services, Transportation Studies, and the Office of Aviation Information [OAI]. In addition, effective January 1, 1996, the responsibility to collect motor carrier financial data was transferred to the BTS after the sunset of the Interstate Commerce Commission. The Office of Aviation Information collects and compiles financial and traffic (passenger and cargo) data. This information provides the Government with uniform and comprehensive economic and market data on individual airline operations. This program includes a small field office located in Anchorage, AK, which provides consumers and the Government with airline data related to essential air service and the intra-Alaskan mail rate program. The statistical aviation data compiled by OAI includes: airline passenger traffic statistics, ontime performance data by carrier, financial performance and certification data, fuel purchase and consumption, and other business and consumer directed statistics. These statistics are vitally important to the Federal Government and the aviation industry. In some cases, it is statutorily required that these statistics be used by the Federal Aviation Administration and the Office of the Secretary of Transportation in allocation of trust funds, aviation bilateral negotiations, and other Federal transportation policy decisionmaking. Railroad rationalization and diversion analysis .--The Committee directs that of the funds provided, $375,000 be for a railroad rationalization and diversion analysis. The Committee notes that railline abandonments and diversion of traffic from railroads to trucks are having a significant impact on rural grain-producing regions. Major grain producing States in the Midwest have experienced significant reductions in railroad service from 1965 to 1995. This research project would develop nationwide capabilities to analyze the impacts of grain-traffic diversion from railroads to highways, and provide important planning information for State and local governments. In addition, the recent shortages of rail cars for grain transportation have created diversion of grain shipments from rail trucks. The main objectives of this project should be to: (1) document the extent of railroad traffic diversion and its likely consequences on highway budgets; (2) forecast the scope of potential future traffic diversions as a result of changes in railroad rate structures, shortages of grain cars or poor management of rail car spotting, and additional line abandonments; (3) estimate the likely impacts of future traffic diversions on State and local highway needs; and (4) formulate potential asset management strategies and policy alternatives. The Committee encourages the Bureau to work with North Dakota State University to carry out this project. MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY GRANTS (liquidation of contract authorization) (Highway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1998 $85,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 100,000,000 Committee recommendation 100,000,000 This program was first authorized by the Surface Transportation Assistance Act of 1982. It provides grants to States for improved enforcement of Federal and State motor carrier safety rules. It has been shown that added enforcement of truck safety rules reduces truck-related accidents and fatalities. The major objective of this program is to reduce the number and severity of accidents involving commercial motor vehicles. The Committee recommends a liquidating cash appropriation of $100,000,000. (limitation on obligations) Appropriations, 1998 ($84,825,000) Budget estimate, 1999 (100,000,000) Committee recommendation (100,000,000) The Committee recommends a limitation on obligations of $100,000,000 for motor carrier safety grants. The Committee recommends the following allocation of motor carrier safety funds: Basic motor carrier safety grants $84,500,000 Performance-based incentive grant program ........................... Border assistance 2,000,000 Priority initiatives 2,500,000 State training and administration 1,000,000 Information systems and strategic planning 10,000,000 100,000,000 Basic motor carrier safety grants .--The Committee has provided $84,500,000 for basic motor carrier safety grants, an increase of $11,000,000 over the fiscal year 1998 level. Safety performance incentive grant program .--The Committee has not provided any of the funds requested for performance grants, partly because FHWA has not yet implemented applicable congressional guidance. In designing an incentive program, OMC should ensure that the allocation formula does not result in a decline from a prior year in the amount of basic funds received by any State. Information systems and analysis .--The Committee has provided $10,000,000, which is $2,000,000 more than the amount provided last year. Of that amount, $3,000,000 will be provided to the States to improve information systems and computer and evaluation capabilities. The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for driver safety activities to continue to improve the CDL programs or judicial outreach of the various States. The Committee allowance includes $5,000,000 for the PRISM project to increase the number of States participating in this program. NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION SUMMARY OF FISCAL YEAR 1999 PROGRAM The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [NHTSA] was established as a separate organizational entity in the Department of Transportation in March 1970, to reduce the mounting number of deaths, injuries, and economic costs resulting from traffic crashes on the Nation's highways. The National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act provides for the establishment and enforcement of Federal safety standards for motor vehicles and associated equipment and research, including the operation of required testing facilities and the National Driver Register. The Motor Vehicle Information and Cost Savings Act initially provided for the establishment of low-speed, collision bumper standards, consumer information activities, diagnostic inspection, and odometer regulations and was later amended to incorporate responsibility for the administration of Federal automotive fuel economy standards. The Highway Safety Act provides for a coordinated highway safety grant program to be carried out by the States, together with supporting research, development, and demonstration programs. Under section 403 of title 23, United States Code, technical assistance is provided to the States in the conduct of their highway safety programs, and research and demonstration projects are conducted to develop and show the effectiveness of new techniques and countermeasures to address highway safety problems. Grants are provided to the States under title 23, United States Code, section 402 to assist in the establishment and improvement of highway safety programs designed to reduce traffic crashes, deaths, and injuries. Alcohol incentive grants are allocated to the States for alcohol-impaired driver safety programs. The occupant protection incentive grants reward States that implement strong laws and programs to increase safety belt and child safety seat use and those that show exceptional performance in raising safety belt use rates. The State highway safety data grants encourage the States to take effective actions to improve the timeliness, accuracy, uniformity, and accessibility of their highway safety data. The following table summarizes the Committee recommendations: Program Fiscal year 1998 enacted\1\ Fiscal year 1999 estimate Committee recommendation Operations and research $146,962,000 $172,902,000 \2\$161,400,000 Highway traffic safety grants (firewall)\3\ \2\186,500,000 233,000,000 200,000,000 ----------------------------- --------------------------- -------------------------- Total 333,462,000 405,902,000 361,400,000 \1\Excludes reductions for TASC pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66. \2\Includes funding for National Driver Register. \3\Limitation on obligations. Operations and Research (Highway Trust Fund) The Congress has recently passed--and the President has signed into law--the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century. For fiscal year 1999, this legislation provided $72,000,000 of contract authority from the highway trust fund to finance NHTSA's operations and research activities under title 23 U.S.C. 403. This funding is included within the firewall guarantee for highway spending, and is not subject to appropriations. The bill includes an authorization subject to appropriations of $89,400,000 for operations and research activities under sections 30104 and 32102 of title 49 U.S.C. and chapter 303 of title 49 U.S.C. for fiscal year 1999. Thus, the total authorized level for fiscal year 1999 for NHTSA operations and research activities is $161,400,000, and the Committee recommends that this full amount be appropriated and be distributed as follows: Committee Program recommendation Safety performance $14,695,000 Safety assurance 21,491,000 Highway safety 56,041,000 Research and analysis 60,147,000 National driver register 2,000,000 Office of the Administrator 4,100,000 General administration 9,250,000 Grant administration reimbursement -6,324,000 161,400,000 Agencywide FTE levels .--Due to budgetary constraints, the Committee denies the request to increase the number of FTE's from 621 to 631. Consequently, the Committee's allowance does not include the $780,000 requested for that purpose. SAFETY PERFORMANCE STANDARDS Uniform tire quality grading standards .--The Committee has included a prohibition that has been included in previous appropriations acts, on any rulemaking which would require that passenger car tires be labeled to indicate their low rolling resistance, or fuel economy characteristics. The Committee has included this provision because the need for such labels has not been adequately justified and the additional costs associated with this proposal would likely be prohibitive. Side impact standard harmonization .--In the conference report accompanying the fiscal year 1997 bill, the conferees noted that there are substantial differences between the U.S. side impact standard and a similar European requirement. The report notes that ``these differences are inconsistent with the need for the international harmonization of motor vehicle safety standards'', and directed that a report be provided on NHTSA's plan for achieving harmonization of the side impact rule. The Committee is concerned that NHTSA is not moving forward more aggressively on this matter, particularly since a harmonized standard could result in a safety improvement for U.S. motorists. Therefore, the Committee directs NHTSA to use funds made available in the vehicle safety performance standard program budget for development of a harmonized side impact standard so long as the Administrator is convinced that such a harmonization effort will improve the safety of U.S. motorists. The Committee directs NHTSA to report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations by December 15, 1998, on progress in addressing this issue. SAFETY ASSURANCE Safety defects investigation .--A portion of the funds provided will be used to examine whether there are significant defect problems in heavy, transit, and emergency response vehicles that require the agency's continued attention. NHTSA should be prepared to document next year the continued need for the additional dollars provided herein for the monitoring and investigating of defects of small population vehicles. HIGHWAY SAFETY PROGRAMS Alcohol Program .--The Committee asserts that State and local governments would benefit greatly if NHTSA provided additional guidance and evaluations on the new grant criteria authorized in the revised alcohol countermeasures traffic safety incentive grant. Information on best practices, implementation guidelines, and countermeasure effectiveness would be particularly beneficial. More specifically, there is a need to ensure that the effectiveness and impacts of 0.08 BAC laws in numerous States are well understood. Special attention needs to be paid to information and analysis that will help State legislatures decide on whether to adapt such a standard. Additional studies on the impacts of the 0.08 BAC laws on the judicial and law enforcement community would be especially beneficial. Also, there is a need for additional implementation guidelines and studies on the effectiveness of countermeasure programs targeted at the 21- to 34-year-old drivers impaired with alcohol and to help States assess whether they wish to impose increased penalties for those convicted of driving while under the influence of higher BAC levels. Youth, drugs, and driving initiative .--For the same reasons detailed last year, the Committee deletes funds for the prelicensure drug testing pilot project. Emergency medical services .--Head injury is a serious public health problem in the United States, with over 2 million injuries occurring each year and over 500,000 leading to hospitalization, the majority of which are caused by motor vehicle accidents. NHTSA began a collaborative project in 1998 to significantly decrease mortality and morbidity due to severe head injury, and to reduce the substantial economic costs to society in caring for head-injured patients. The first phase of this project covered the development of a voluntary national standards curriculum for emergency medical service providers on the prehospital treatment of severe head injury. The Committee directs that of the funds made available for emergency medical services, $250,000 be used to complete the second phase of this project to field test the dissemination and implementation of these head injury prehospital protocols. The Committee encourages NHTSA to continue to work with the Aitken Neuroscience Center to carry out this program. The Committee has also included $1,000,000 for a head injury prevention project at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. The initial focus of this effort will be on the prehospital aspect of trauma research involving the causative factors of the injury. Roadway design, environmental factors, and automotive safety all contribute to the potential for head injury. Funds will be used to develop a sophisticated computer center for maintenance of a detailed data base which would integrate both the engineering design factors with patient care outcomes. Older driver research. --The Committee has included $1,000,000 for the Pennsylvania State University consortium for the demonstration of technologies and practices to improve the driving performance of older drivers and other special groups. Red light running initiative .--The Committee continues to be concerned with the high number of motorists who disregard traffic signals. Failure to obey traffic signals is one of the leading causes of urban crashes, which claim the lives of many Americans every year. The Committee notes that Secretary Pen AE6a reported that accidents resulting from failure to obey traffic signals cost Americans about $7,000,000,000 in medical bills, time off work, insurance premium increases, and property damage. The problem of red light running in Jefferson Parish, LA, is exacerbated by the interstate nature of traffic patterns. To combat this problem, the Jefferson Parish Sheriff's Office has initiated an innovative program to combat red light running. This program has the potential to serve as a national model, and the Committee has included $100,000 for the development, deployment, and evaluation of this program in Jefferson Parish. RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS Biomechanics .--Funding is continued for hospital-based, indepth crash injury studies at four trauma centers. Currently, these centers are located at the William Lehman Injury Research Center at Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami; the National Study Center for Trauma and EMS, Baltimore; the University of Medicine and Dentistry, New Jersey; and the Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC. Child crash test dummy. --The Committee recognizes that during fiscal year 1998, a program to develop a new child test dummy was launched by a consortium of Pennsylvania universities and a private crashworthiness firm. This project will compare the injuries suffered by children in automobile accidents with crash dummy tests to assess the level of injury prediction of the current dummies. This project will improve the current state of research on injuries suffered by children in automobile accidents, and the Committee encourages NHTSA to work with this consortium to improve child safety. Spray suppression research .--The Committee acknowledges the work previously undertaken by NHTSA in the area of spray suppression research and evaluation of abatement technologies and continues to support further research by NHTSA in this area to make travel on the Nation's highways safer and less stressful. The Committee is aware of the progress made in the European Union in designing beneficial performance standards and implementing roadway spray suppression regulations to improve highway visibility. The Committee directs NHTSA to update its research by conducting a comprehensive review and evaluation of spray suppression measures that can be employed on heavy duty vehicles (over 8,500 pounds gross vehicle weight rating) to provide clearer highway visibility and safety during periods of adverse weather conditions. NHTSA shall publish and report its findings to Congress within 12 months of enactment. NATIONAL DRIVER REGISTER The National Driver Register [NDR] is a central repository of information on individuals whose licenses to operate a motor vehicle have been revoked, suspended, canceled, or denied. The NDR also contains information on persons who have been convicted of serious traffic-related violations such as driving while impaired by alcohol or other drugs. State driver licensing officials query the NDR when individuals apply for a license, for the purpose of determining whether driving privileges have been withdrawn by other States. Other organizations such as the Federal Aviation Administration and the Federal Railroad Administration also use NDR license data in hiring and certification decisions in overall U.S. transportation operations. The bill includes $2,000,000 for the NDR. HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY GRANTS (Liquidation of Contract Authorization) (Highway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1998 ($186,000,000) Budget estimate, 1999 (197,000,000) Committee recommendation (200,000,000) The Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century authorized the following State grant programs: Highway Safety Program, the Alcohol-Impaired Driving Countermeasures Incentive Grant Program, the Occupant Protection Incentive Grant Program, and the State Highway Safety Data Grant Program. Under the Highway Safety Program, grant allocations are determined on the basis of a statutory formula established under 20 U.S.C. 402. Individual States use this funding in national priority areas established by Congress which have the greatest potential for achieving safety improvements and reducing traffic crashes, fatalities, and injuries. The Alcohol-Impaired Driving Countermeasures Incentive Grant Program encourages States to enact stiffer laws and implement stronger programs to detect and remove impaired drivers from the roads. The occupant protection program encourages States to promote and strengthen occupant protection initiatives. The State Highway Safety Data Grants Program encourages States to improve their collection and dissemination of important highway safety data. The Committee recommends an appropriation for liquidation of contract authorization of $200,000,000 for the payment of obligations incurred in carrying out provisions of these grant programs. The Committee has included a provision prohibiting the use of section 402 funds for construction, rehabilitation or remodeling costs, or for office furnishings and fixtures for State, local, or private buildings or structures. LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS The bill includes language limiting the obligations to be incurred under the various highway traffic safety grants programs. Separate obligation limitations are included in the bill with the following funding allocations: Fiscal year 1998 enacted Fiscal year 1999 estimate Committee recommendation Highway safety programs $149,700,000 $166,700,000 $150,000,000 Alcohol-impaired driving countermeasures grants 34,500,000 39,000,000 35,000,000 Occupant protection incentive grants 20,000,000 10,000,000 Drugged driving incentive grants 5,000,000 State highway safety data grants 5,000,000 -------------------------- --------------------------- -------------------------- Total 184,200,000 230,700,000 200,000,000 FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION SUMMARY OF FISCAL YEAR 1999 PROGRAM The Federal Railroad Administration [FRA] became an operating administration within the Department of Transportation on April 1, 1967. It incorporated the Bureau of Railroad Safety from the Interstate Commerce Commission, the Office of High Speed Ground Transportation from the Department of Commerce, and the Alaska Railroad from the Department of the Interior. The Federal Railroad Administration is responsible for planning, developing, and administering programs to achieve safe operating and mechanical practices in the railroad industry. Grants to the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) and other financial assistance programs to rehabilitate and improve the railroad industry's physical infrastructure are also administered by the Federal Railroad Administration. The Committee recommends new appropriations and obligation limitations totaling $707,150,000 for the activities of the Federal Railroad Administration for fiscal year 1999. This is $44,209,000 less than the budget request. In addition to these appropriated Federal funds, $1,091,810,000 will be paid to Amtrak in fiscal year 1999 by the Secretary of the Treasury pursuant to section 977 of the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997. The following table summarizes the Committee recommendations: Program Fiscal year-- Committee recommendation 1998 enacted\1\ 1999 budget estimate Office of the Administrator $20,290,000 $21,573,000 $21,020,000 Railroad safety 57,067,000 61,959,000 61,876,000 Railroad research and development 20,758,000 20,757,000 25,760,000 Nationwide differential global positioning sys- tem 3,000,000 Northeast Corridor Improvement Program 250,000,000 (\2\) Railroad Rehabilitation and Improvement Financing Program Next generation high-speed rail 20,395,000 12,594,000 28,494,000 Alaska railroad rehabilitation 10,000,000 10,000,000 Rhode Island rail development 10,000,000 10,000,000 5,000,000 Grants to National Railroad Passenger Corpora- tion (appropriations)\3\ 344,000,000 621,476,000 555,000,000 ----------------- ----------------------- ------------------ Subtotal, Amtrak and NECIP 1,685,810,000 1,713,286,000 1,646,810,000 ================= ======================= ================== Total budgetary resources 1,824,320,000 \4\1,843,169,000 \4\1,798,960,000 \1\Excludes reduction for TASC pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66; also excludes reduction to Alaska railroad rehabilitation pursuant to Presidential line item veto. \2\Included in Amtrak request. \3\Administration requests fiscal year 1999 appropriation from highway trust fund. \4\Includes Taxpayer Relief Act funds. OFFICE OF THE ADMINISTRATOR Appropriations, 1998\1\ $20,290,000 Budget estimate, 1999 21,573,000 Committee recommendation 21,020,000 \1\Excludes reduction for TASC pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66. The Office of the Administrator provides support and guidance on issues concerning the railroad industry and the day-to-day operations of the Federal Railroad Administration. The appropriation includes budget activities related to executive direction and administration and policy support aimed at resolving problems facing the railroad industry. COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION The Committee recommends the following adjustments to the budget request: Travel -$52,000 Equipment -101,000 Electronic grant program -200,000 Decrease amount estimated for vendor increases/inflation -200,000 The recommendation for the Office of the Administrator is $21,020,000, which is $553,000 less than the amount requested in the administration's budget. The Committee is holding travel and equipment expenses to the fiscal year 1998 level, and directs that funds for the electronic grant program be obtained within the agency's base program funding. RAILROAD SAFETY Appropriations, 1998 $57,067,000 Budget estimate, 1999 61,959,000 Committee recommendation 61,876,000 This appropriation finances the development, administration, and enforcement of programs designed to achieve safe operating and mechanical practices in the railroad industry. The Committee recommends a $61,876,000 program level for the Railroad Safety Program, $83,000 less than the amount requested by the administration. The Committee has provided funding for the three railroad safety activities at the following levels: Federal enforcement $45,826,000 Automated track inspection program 2,500,000 Safety regulation and program administration 13,550,000 Total, Office of Railroad Safety 61,876,000 Federal enforcement staffing increases .--The FRA has requested a staffing increase of 32 FTE's in fiscal year 1999, for a total of $1,691,000 in associated personnel costs. The Committee recommendation provides funding for 16 of these requested positions: 8 principal inspectors positions, who will be assigned to each of FRA's regional offices to assist in the agency's Safety Assurance and Compliance Program [SACP]; and 8 field inspectors, who will be distributed throughout selected regional offices to perform site-specific inspections (particularly of small railroads), and to participate in agency rulemaking working groups. Overall, the workload of FRA's inspector resources has been increased by railroad mergers, where as large railroads consolidate, numerous small feeder railroads are being independently formed. The SACP process has also increased inspector responsibilities. However, the Committee notes that during the last 10 years there has been a substantial increase in the number of FRA staff employed by the Office of Railroad Safety, and in view of the significant improvements in railroad safety during that same period, the Committee maintains that an increase of 32 positions over 2 years is inappropriate. Operation Lifesaver .--The Committee recommends $600,000 for Operation Lifesaver to help fund the organization's State assistance grants, educational programs, and 5-year public awareness and education campaign. This level is $300,000 above that requested by the administration. The Federal Highway Administration provides annual funding from the Surface Transportation Program safety set-aside to cover Operation Lifesaver salaries and benefits and overhead costs ($300,000 a year under ISTEA; $500,000 a year is authorized in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century [TEA21]). All the appropriated funds in this account are program funds, supporting Operation Lifesaver's 49 active State programs and national safety initiatives. In the fiscal year 1998 Senate Report 105 55, the Committee encouraged FRA to increase the percentage of safety inspectors who are certified to be Operation Lifesaver presenters from 60 to 80 percent. FRA's response was immediate and robust. However, it has come to the Committee's attention that some FRA inspectors are not comfortable with, or particularly effective at, public speaking. Therefore, the Committee is broadening the interpretation of this goal to include certification as Operation Lifesaver associates within the goal of 80 percent FRA inspector participation. Operation Respond .--Operation Respond is a public/private partnership that provides critical information to first responders at hazardous cargo and passenger train incidents. Subscribers to Operation Respond's software package can access rail and motor carriers' mainframe data bases for access by the emergency response community, so a firefighter or police officer can obtain, via computer modem, a list of the cargo contents and guidelines on how to safely manage a Hazmat spill or passenger train accident. Federal support for Operation Respond is included in the safety regulation and program administration base. Grade crossing safety .--In addition to the increased Operation Lifesaver funding level, the Committee recommends an additional $450,000 for FRA's public education, training, and enforcement liaison activities associated with grade crossing and trespasser challenges above the requested funding of $757,000. The Committee has been informed that FRA was required to conduct an unanticipated environmental impact statement [EIS] for the agency's forthcoming regulation pertaining to whistle bans. The funds to conduct the study were derived from the core grade crossing program--$220,000 of the additional $275,000 provided by the conferees in fiscal year 1998 for enhanced grade crossing safety initiatives. Though whistle ban work is one of the six eligible activities listed in the statement of managers, the Committee believes that additional funds are needed in fiscal year 1999 to strengthen FRA's overall grade crossing safety program, and has provided these funds for the express purposes outlined in the conference report (House Report 105 313). In addition, FRA is encouraged to work with law enforcement personnel on grade crossing activities, and some portion of these additional funds may be used to defer costs associated with these cooperative efforts. NATIONWIDE DIFFERENTIAL GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM Appropriations, 1998 ........................... Budget estimate, 1999 $3,000,000 Committee recommendation ........................... In 1999, the administration has requested a new appropriation under FRA and FHWA which will enable installation of nationwide differential global positioning system [NDGPS] transmitters by enhancing the existing Coast Guard network throughout the United States. The FHWA portion of the NDGPS installation funding, $5,500,000 would be administered by FRA to support national NDGPS coverage toward establishing a network that would facilitate positive train control technologies. Also in the FHWA budget, $4,154,000 was requested under the NDGPS contract for the L5 system (an alternative civil frequency) for the GPS. In total, the Department's budget requests $15,254,000 for NDGPS activities in fiscal year 1999. The Committee has not provided the funds requested for NDGPS under this head, and has also denied funding for related requests within the Federal Highway Administration's surface transportation research contract program. However, $6,920,000 in NDGPS funding has been included in the Coast Guard's ``Acquisition, construction, and improvements'' account, for continued installation of DGPS transmitters throughout the United States, toward the enhancement of the existing Coast Guard DGPS network, which is now operating only in areas along the coasts and navigable inland waterways. In terms of transportation needs, the primary benefit of the requested investment for the L5 system would accrue to the Federal Aviation Administration's wide area augmentation system program. The Committee maintains that it would be inappropriate to fund these aviation benefits from the Federal highway trust fund. Furthermore, there is little, if any, evidence of the pressing need for a substantial departmental investment in DGPS to support the National ITS Program or the development of positive train control-based rail systems. The Committee is also concerned that the total costs for construction, operation, and maintenance of the DGPS over the next 15 years could exceed $90,000,000 and that costs of construction of L5 line has not yet been reliably determined, but could require $100,000,000 to $200,000,000. More generally, the Committee has not provided DGPS funds because the primary benefit of that investment in the near-term would accrue to many other Federal agencies and commercial interests. The Committee maintains that DGPS-related expenses should not be derived solely from the Federal highway trust fund or other DOT accounts. Recognizing the importance of both DGPS and L5 to a wide array of strategic national purposes, the Secretary will need to obtain funding from other Federal agencies and sources as well as other modal administrations. The Department is directed to submit a report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations as part of the fiscal year 2000 budget justification identifying the long-term costs, benefits, and cost sharing that might be reasonably expected for both DGPS and the L5. The likely financial role of the States, other Federal agencies, and the private sector in those systems should be clearly specified in terms of expected cash and in-kind contributions. The report also should address the role that DGPS will play in the national ITS program and in the development of positive train control systems. Both near-term (next 5 years) and long-term (next 20 years) needs should be considered. The costs and benefits of further investment in DGPS for transportation purposes, and an analysis of the actual number of highway crashes in which emergency responders are substantially delayed because of an inability to obtain exact crash locations also should be addressed in the report. RAILROAD RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Appropriations, 1998 $20,758,000 Budget estimate, 1999 20,757,000 Committee recommendation 25,760,000 The Federal Railroad Administration's Railroad Research and Development Program provides for research in the development of safety and performance standards for high speed rail and the evaluation of their role in the Nation's transportation infrastructure. The program also provides support for the Deputy Associate Administrator for Technology Development and the staff of the Office of Research and Development. The Committee recommends an appropriation of $25,760,000 for railroad research and development. COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION The Committee recommends the following changes to the administration's budget submission: Equipment, operation, and hazardous materials +$1,800,000 Safety of high speed ground transportation -150,000 R&D facilities -500,000 Alaska Railroad positive train control research and implementa- tion +4,000,000 Administration -147,000 Equipment, operation, and hazardous materials .--The Committee recommends a program funding level of $7,466,000, which is $1,800,000 more than the administration's request. Within this amount, $2,000,000 shall be for a full-scale crash test of rail passenger equipment at the Transportation Test Center [TTC] near Pueblo, CO. Currently, FRA has a contract with the Volpe Transportation Research Center that supports research on rail equipment collision and evacuation safety which depends heavily on computer modeling. It is the Committee's belief that the accuracy and usefulness of this research will be enhanced with a controlled, full-scale, passenger car crash (utilizing donated equipment), which will generate real-time data on which to base further computer modeling and simulation work. The Committee has decreased the human factors budget activity by $200,000 for the proposed study on engineer napping strategies. Track and vehicle-track interaction .--The Committee recommends a program funding level of $6,950,000, which holds the program to the enacted level. This funding level represents all projects being held to a current services level and an increase of $500,000 in the bridge safety area. The additional bridge safety funds shall be used to demonstrate and evaluate the use of carbon composites for strengthening aging steel railroad bridges. These funds shall be made available to a constructed facilities center with extensive experience in this area. The Committee is concerned that recent consolidations in the rail freight industry have caused significant increases in rail congestion and safety implications for the affected communities. Within this total funding level, $500,000 is provided for the development of an automatic traffic control management and monitoring system to enhance safety and minimize traffic congestion that results from increased rail freight traffic in selected high density corridors. Safety of high-speed ground transportation .--The Committee recommends a program funding level of $4,800,000, a decrease of $150,000 below the administration's request. Funding is not provided for the assessment of current maglev systems. Research and development facilities .--The Committee has included the requested bill provision that allows FRA to sell old aluminum reaction rail at the TTC. The aluminum reaction rail test track with side guide rail was built in the 1970's, and does not have any research function in today's high-speed rail testing environment. The aluminum is an unused asset that could be sold to raise funds for needed capital improvements at the TTC. The aluminum has not been formally appraised, and there will be costs associated with removing the track, but estimates of the aluminum's net worth range from $500,000 to $1,000,000. The Committee has authorized FRA to use any profits realized from this sale for physical plant improvements at TTC. The Committee recommends a program funding level of $130,000 for R&D facilities, and has not provided the requested funds for the T 6 research vehicle ( -$500,000). The Committee is aware that the Association of American Railroads [AAR], which jointly manages many of the research activities at the TTC, has recently purchased a new track research vehicle. To avoid duplicative costs, the Committee directs FRA to include in the fiscal year 2000 budget justification a description of FRA's track research vehicle needs, and an analysis of whether the FRA could utilize the AAR track research vehicle that is currently onsite at TTC. Alaska Railroad positive train control research and implementation .--The Committee recommends $4,000,000 for the Alaska Railroad's ongoing efforts to implement collision avoidance positive train control system over the entire Alaska Railroad system. These funds will help fund a satellite-based communications and tracking system that will provide positive train separation for all locomotives and track vehicles, and precision train control with movement-pass planning capabilities. The Committee understands that the Alaska Railroad presents a uniquely suitable staging area for positive train control, because it will be much simpler and quicker to install PTC on the Alaska Railroad than on any other American rail system. The Alaska Railroad does not have any signaling system in place today, only grade crossing signals, and dispatching of trains is done exclusively with voice radio transmission of track warrants. Consequently, unlike the situation on other privately controlled systems in the lower 48 States, on the Alaska Railroad there is no debate over the correct strategy to convert from current conventional signaling to PTC signaling. This project, once completed, will be more than a demonstration project--it will be a fully operational PTC system, providing the FRA and rail industry with an invaluable baseline reference for other positive train control system development projects. Administration .--The Committee has provided $2,612,000 for administration of the Office of Railroad Research and Development, holding funding to current service levels. The Committee approves the position requested to manage and oversee communications-based positive train control projects, but has not approved the new position for an additional track engineer. NORTHEAST CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Appropriations, 1998 $250,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 (\1\) Committee recommendation ........................... \1\Requested funding of $200,000,000 for NECIP and $11,746,530 for Pennsylvania Station redevelopment is included in the proposed ``Capital grants to the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (highway trust fund)'' appropriation. For fiscal year 1999, the administration has requested Northeast Corridor Improvement Program [NECIP] funding under the ``Capital grants to the National Railroad Passenger Corporation'' account. RAILROAD REHABILITATION AND IMPROVEMENT FINANCING PROGRAM Section 502 of Public Law 94 210, as amended authorizes obligation guarantees for meeting the long-term capital needs of private railroads. Railroads utilize this funding mechanism to finance major new facilities and rehabilitation or consolidation of current facilities. No appropriations or new loan guarantee commitments are proposed in fiscal year 1999 consistent with the budget request. The Rail Rehabilitation and Improvement Financing Program, as established in section 7203 of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century [TEA21], will enable the Secretary of Transportation to provide loans and loan guarantees to State and local governments, Government-sponsored authorities and corporations, railroads and joint ventures to acquire, improve, or rehabilitate intermodal or rail equipment or facilities, including track, bridges, yards, and shops. However, due to budgetary constraints, the Committee is unable to provide fiscal year 1999 appropriated general funds to fund the credit risk premium portion of the program as required by the Credit Reform Act. The Committee anticipates that the Department will likely receive applications incorporating non-Federal commitments for this risk premium, as authorized in the enabling legislation. The Committee expects that the Secretary will consider any such applications carefully, given the extent of the potential risk to the Federal Government as the guarantor of the loan guarantee amount. While this loan and loan guarantee program provides an opportunity for developing significant rail infrastructure improvements benefiting the national transportation system, the Secretary should proceed judiciously to ensure that any approved applications are fully warranted. NEXT GENERATION HIGH-SPEED RAIL Appropriations, 1998 $20,395,000 Budget estimate, 1999 12,594,000 Committee recommendation 28,494,000 The Committee has provided $23,494,000 in general fund appropriations for the High-Speed Ground Transportation [HSGT] Program. The amount provided is $10,900,000 more than the administration's request. The Committee first provided funding for the Next Generation High-Speed Rail [NGHSR] Program in fiscal year 1995. The program funds high-speed rail research, development, and technology programs that are aimed at demonstrations to foster high-speed passenger service on corridors throughout the country. The NGHSR program's authorization lapsed at the end of fiscal year 1998, and has been recently reauthorized in sections 7201 and 1103 of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century. In section 1103, an automatic set-aside of $5,250,000 a year from surface transportation program safety funds is made available for the elimination of rail-highway crossing hazards. A limited number of rail corridors are deemed eligible for these funds, including the gulf coast high speed railway corridor. Of these set-aside funds, the Committee directs that $1,000,000 be used to mitigate grade crossing hazards on the Mobile, AL, to New Orleans, LA, segment of the gulf coast corridor. In addition to the automatic set-aside funding, $15,000,000 in general funds is authorized to be appropriated for these purposes. However, due to budgetary constraints, no additional funds are appropriated pursuant to this authorization. Section 7201 of TEA21 provides a more general authorization of the high-speed rail program at a total level of $35,000,000 in general funds each year through fiscal year 2001. Within this total, $10,000,000 a year is authorized for high-speed rail corridor planning. The current Federal Railroad Administration NGHSR program emphasizes technology development and consequently, the Committee has not provided any new funds for high-speed rail corridor planning activities. The Committee has made the following adjustments to the administration's next generation high-speed rail programs: Prototype nonelectric high-speed [HS] locomotive +$4,200,000 Advanced propulsion project +1,600,000 New York RTL 3 turbo trains +2,500,000 Sealed corridor initiative +2,100,000 High-speed Talgo service, Las Vegas-Los Angeles +5,000,000 Positive train control study +500,000 Nonelectric locomotives .--The Committee has provided a total of $15,100,000 for the high-speed, nonelectric locomotive program. This is $8,300,000 more than the level requested by the administration (a request that was $2,500,000 less than the fiscal year 1998 enacted program level). The Committee is dismayed by the administration's lack of program continuity in the nonelectric locomotive area. FRA should take ownership of these projects, and request a steady and reliable funding stream from year to year. The Committee expects that the fiscal year 2000 budget justification will demonstrate this continuity and commitment to the nonelectric locomotive projects that are currently underway. Prototype nonelectric HS locomotive and advanced propulsion project .--The funds for these programs focus on the demonstration of a high-speed, lightweight fossil fuel locomotive that will be able to facilitate the testing of an advanced locomotive propulsion system [ALPS]. The Committee recommends $9,000,000 for the locomotive demonstration and $3,600,000 for the ALPS program. These locomotives will be designed to facilitate the testing of a flywheel turbine developed under the ALPS program. The locomotives should have the potential to operate at 150 mph, yet be available for revenue demonstration at speeds of 125 mph within a 2-year period. New York RTL 3 turbo trains .--The Committee recommends $2,500,000 for the refurbishment of two turbo trainsets for revenue service on Amtrak's empire corridor from New York City to Buffalo. This project received $2,500,000 in fiscal year 1998, which remains unobligated at this time. With this additional funding, the contract to complete the upgrades on two trainsets will be fully realized. Grade crossing hazard mitigation .--The Committee recommends $2,500,000 for the North Carolina sealed corridor initiative, $2,100,000 more than the level requested by the administration. The sealed corridor initiative is a State-supported effort to systematically install crossing hardware that positively prevents crossing incursions on 130 grade crossings on the 140-mile route from Raleigh to Charlotte. This project is also an excellent candidate for the TEA21 set-aside hazard elimination program referenced above, and the Committee encourages FRA to consider granting up to $2,500,000 of the funds in that program to the North Carolina sealed corridor initiative upon enactment of the authorization bill. High-speed Talgo service between Las Vegas and Los Angeles .--The Committee has provided $5,000,000 for infrastructure upgrades including traffic and signal systems, improving right-of-way quality and elevation, and construction of passenger facilities on the 340-mile rail corridor from Las Vegas to Los Angeles. Currently, there is no Amtrak rail service between these cities. The private sector partners have agreed to cover all operating expenses associated with this service. Positive train control study .--The Committee recommends $500,000 for the FRA to conduct a study that will promote positive train control [PTC] systems used in high-speed rail operations and interoperability among those systems. Currently, there is no assurance that all PTC systems being advanced will allow equipment of one railroad to be used on the track of another. There is no common agreement of the communication formats and information flows that must be shared to allow interoperability. The objective of the proposed study is to characterize the common elements required for interoperability in order to promote high-speed rail development in the United States. The study will provide the basis for developing an open systems architecture to facilitate interoperable PTC systems. The study is an important step toward ensuring that different positive train control technologies, which might be used in the future by different railroads, can communicate or interact effectively with each other. This research will accelerate the development of any high-speed rail project, the RSAC work on positive train control, and the national objective of establishing an interoperable high-speed rail system in the United States. In order to ensure an objective study, these funds shall be awarded to a research institution or organization without a vested interest in any particular PTC technology. ALASKA RAILROAD REHABILITATION Appropriations, 1998\1\ $10,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 ........................... Committee recommendation 10,000,000 \1\Reflects reduction of $5,280,000 pursuant to Presidential line item veto. The Committee has included a total of $10,000,000 for rail safety and infrastructure improvements benefiting passenger operations of the Alaska railroad. This railroad extends 470 miles from Seward through Anchorage, the largest city in Alaska, to the interior town of Fairbanks. It carries both passengers and freight, and provides a critical transportation link for passengers and cargo traveling through difficult terrain and harsh climatic conditions. The $10,000,000 provided in the bill will continue the railroad's multiyear effort to reduce the backlog of deferred track maintenance and related capital rehabilitation. The railroad has always provided a substantial non-Federal match for past Federal appropriations, and will continue to do so. RHODE ISLAND RAIL DEVELOPMENT Appropriations, 1998 $10,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 10,000,000 Committee recommendation 5,000,000 The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for construction of a third track paralleling the Northeast corridor for the 22-mile stretch between Quonset Point/Davisville and Central Falls, RI. This project is an initiative supported by the administration and Amtrak, to avoid mixing freight traffic and high-speed passenger rail service and to provide sufficient clearance to accommodate double-stack freight cars. There is a 50-percent match required on the third-rail project, and Rhode Island voters have approved a $50,000,000 State bond issue to meet this match requirement. In May 1998 the Federal Highway Administration and Federal Railroad Administration signed the record of decision on this project, completing the environmental impact statement [EIS] process. This will enable the State of Rhode Island to commence action on final design and construction. To date, this project has received $23,000,000 in Federal funds, of which $3,500,000 has been obligated. However, with the completion of the EIS, the Committee anticipates that the spending pace will speed up, and that, by the end of fiscal year 1999, at least $37,600,000 in total project funds will have been expended. According to the State's project schedule, the total amount of Federal funds that should be obligated by the end of the fiscal year is $18,800,000, leaving a Federal share unexpended balance of $4,200,000. Combined with the $5,000,000 made available in this appropriation, there should be sufficient carryover funds to allow Rhode Island to sign long-lead procurement contracts in 1999, so that the integrated construction plan is not slowed, nor the overall Northeast corridor electrification program impeded. CAPITAL GRANTS TO THE NATIONAL RAILROAD PASSENGER CORPORATION (AMTRAK) Appropriation Public Law 105 34 section 977 Total Appropriations and other Federal funding, 1998 $344,000,000 $1,091,810,000 \1\$1,685,810,000 Budget estimate, 1999\2\ 621,476,000 1,091,810,000 1,713,286,000 Committee recommendation 555,000,000 1,091,810,000 1,646,810,000 \1\This total includes Northeast corridor improvement program funds. \2\The administration requested that 1999 funding be derived from the highway trust fund. The Fiscal Year 1998 Transportation Appropriations Act, Public Law 105 66, included $543,000,000 for Amtrak capital and operating grants from general funds. The capital funding portion of this appropriation, $199,000,000, was included to ensure some level of capital support for Amtrak in the event that the tax refund mechanism contained in the Taxpayer Relief Act (Public Law 105 34 section 977) was not enacted. The bill was signed by the President on August 5, 1997, and on December 2, 1997, the Amtrak Reform and Accountability Act was enacted, triggering the release of the TRA funds. On March 20, 1998, the Secretary of the Treasury made a payment of $1,161,500,000 to Amtrak--one-half of the total TRA payment, with the remainder due in 1999. Amtrak is statutorily required in the TRA to make payments to each of the six non-Amtrak States (Alaska, Hawaii, Maine, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Wyoming) of 1 percent of the total Amtrak receives in that year. On April 19, 1998, Amtrak transferred a payment of $11,615,000 to each non-Amtrak State, for a total of $69,690,000. Therefore, the net level of Federal funding that Amtrak received from the Taxpayer Relief Act in fiscal year 1998 was $1,091,810,000. The railroad will receive an identical payment, under the same requirements, in fiscal year 1999. For fiscal year 1999, the administration has requested an appropriation of $621,476,000 for capital funding, to be derived from the highway trust fund. These funds would be in addition to the $1,091,810,000 in fiscal year 1999 TRA funds. The total, $1,713,286,000, would represent an historically high Federal funding level for Amtrak over its 28-year history as a Government-subsidized for-profit corporation. Amtrak appropriations history--1971 98 [In millions of dollars] Fiscal year Annual total 1971 72 40.0 1973 170.0 1974 149.1 1975 276.5 1976 471.2 Transition quarter (fiscal year change) 180.0 1977 800.7 1978 1,116.0 1979 1,234.0 1980 1,223.4 1981 1,246.3 1982 905.0 1983 815.0 1984 816.4 1985 707.6 1986 602.7 1987 618.5 1988 608.3 1989 603.6 1990 629.1 1991 798.9 1992 861.2 1993 846.1 1993 supplemental appropriations 45.0 1994 922.2 1995 972.0 1996 750.0 1997 760.0 Omnibus consolidated appropriations 1997 82.5 1998 (Taxpayer Relief Act) 1,091.8 1998 (appropriations, Amtrak operations and Northeast corridor improvement program) 594.0 Total 20,937.1 Source .--Amtrak Strategic Business Plan, fiscal year 1998 2000 (September 23, 1997). [Graphic Image Not Available] Under the administration's fiscal year 1999 request, no less than $200,000,000 would be for Northeast corridor improvements; $409,229,470 would be for capital grants; $11,746,530 would be for the New York Pennsylvania Station redevelopment project; and $500,000 would be for departmental costs associated with the independent assessment of Amtrak's financial requirements and Amtrak reform council administrative expenses. COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION The Committee recommends an additional $555,000,000 for Amtrak capital grants in fiscal year 1999. This is $66,476,000 less than the administration's request, and brings total Federal fiscal year 1999 funding for Amtrak to $1,646,810,000 when the Taxpayer Relief Act funding of $1,091,810,000 is included. This funding level should be sufficient to provide for Amtrak's capital infrastructure and equipment needs. The Committee has included bill language to allow the capital funds provided in this act to be spent under the same definition of capital expenses that currently pertains to Federal capital funds provided for other transportation modes. In addition, section 977 of the TRA, which allows the use of funds for ``the acquisition of equipment, rolling stock, and other capital improvements, the upgrading of maintenance facilities, and the maintenance of existing equipment, in intercity passenger rail service * * *'', statutorily provides Amtrak the flexibility to utilize the TRA capital funds in the most effective ways. According to the fiscal year 1999 budget, Amtrak estimates that approximately $400,000,000 of its annual operating expenses are spent on progressive overhauls and maintenance of existing equipment, and that these expenses are eligible for funding under the TRA. If Amtrak's own operating revenues are insufficient to cover its fiscal year 1999 costs, an amount of the railroad's eligible expenses could be funded either through the TRA or through funds provided in this act utilizing the broader definition of capital expenses. Use of appropriated capital funds .--The administration's request earmarks $500,000 for departmental costs associated with the independent assessment of Amtrak's financial requirements and Amtrak reform council administrative expenses. This is not necessary, because the Committee has responded to both these issues within other accounts. The departmental expenses have been incurred primarily by the Office of Inspector General [OIG], and the Committee responded this past spring by allowing the OIG to transfer $400,000 of the $2,450,000 provided for the Amtrak Reform Council in the fiscal year 1998 emergency supplemental (Public Law 105 174), to alleviate the costs of new responsibilities associated with administering the contract for the independent financial assessment. In addition, $450,000 is provided for the newly formed Amtrak Reform Council under a separate head in this bill, to pay for administrative expenses incurred in carrying out its mission as outlined in the Amtrak Reform and Accountability Act of 1997. The administration's request also earmarks $11,746,530 for the New York Pennsylvania Station redevelopment project. It is not necessary to provide appropriated general funds for this project, because it has been fully funded by a high-priority projects contract authority earmark of $40,000,000 in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA21, sec. 1602, No. 1679). The Federal Government committed to a $100,000,000 share of this project, which will renovate and reconstruct the James A. Farley Post Office in New York City as a new Amtrak station, replacing the current Amtrak connection at Pennsylvania Station one block away. The two stations will be connected by a lengthened underground passenger platform, mitigating crowded conditions, and separating the commuter rail operations from the intercity passenger rail operations. To date, Federal funds provided through ISTEA and appropriations bills total $88,253,470. With the $40,000,000 guaranteed highway funds that are provided in TEA21, the Federal commitment will be more than filled, and further appropriated funds are not necessary. Northeast Corridor Improvement Program.-- The Committee has recommended $200,000,000 of the appropriated capital funds for the Northeast Corridor Improvement Program, as requested by the administration. The Committee is aware that work on implementing Amtrak's Northeast corridor high-speed rail program is progressing rapidly on all fronts. Electrification and infrastructure work and trainset manufacturing are underway, and the railroad is planning every facet of implementation of the new high-speed rail service when the first Bombardier trainset is delivered to Amtrak for revenue service in October 1999. Much of Amtrak's future is riding on the success of this high-speed service. Amtrak estimates in its March 10, 1998 revised strategic business plan that the profits associated with the initiation of high-speed service in the Northeast corridor will net the railroad some immediate level of profit in fiscal year 1999, and an increasing profit margin of $93,000,000 in fiscal year 2000, $190,000,000 in fiscal year 2001, and $210,000,000 in fiscal year 2002. The cost benefits of high-speed service will allow the railroad to become less dependent on Federal subsidies, and the shorter travel times should make all passenger train service between Washington, DC, and Boston even more competitive with other transportation choices. Of the appropriated general capital funds provided for Amtrak in this bill, $3,950,000 shall be dedicated to funding the following projects of high priority in the specified amounts: Southern Pines, NC, railroad station restoration .--The Committee recommends $800,000 for restoration of the historic Southern Pines, NC, railroad station, which is owned by the State of North Carolina and is served by Amtrak's Silver Star route. The State will contribute to this project, which enjoys broad local support. Brattleboro to White River Junction, VT, rail signalization upgrade project .--The Committee recommends $500,000 for the replacement of outdated pole line signal controls along the main rail line between Brattleboro and White River Junction, VT. The Amtrak Vermonter is routed along this track, which is owned by the New England Central Railroad. These funds shall be used to upgrade the pole line signal system to an electronic control system along this 60-mile stretch of track. Advanced civil speed enforcement systems upgrade .--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for the installation of a speed monitoring system, the advanced civil speed enforcement systems [ACSES], on all locomotives operating between New Haven, CT, and Boston, MA. In the interest of passenger and crew safety, the Federal Railroad Administration has required the installation of the ACSES on all locomotives, of both passenger and freight trains, that operate on the segment of the Northeast corridor between New Haven and Boston, before high-speed rail service is introduced on the north end of the corridor. The funds made available herein shall be distributed to freight or passenger operators who have not yet made this capital upgrade, and priority consideration shall be given to smaller operators who have no alternative Federal source of funds for this purpose. Amtrak station at T.F. Green Airport .--The Committee is aware of the State of Rhode Island's interest in enhancing high speed passenger rail service and improving intermodal transportation by establishing an Amtrak station at T.F. Green Airport. The Committee believes the airport's close proximity to the Northeast corridor and the State's efforts to date make this a worthy initiative that deserves Amtrak's and the Federal Railroad Administration's [FRA] support and assistance. The Committee instructs Amtrak and the FRA to report on their efforts to assist the State of Rhode Island by February 1, 1999. Erie, PA, rail passenger station renovation .--The Committee recommends $1,400,000 for rehabilitation and relocation of the Erie, PA, Amtrak passenger station. Amtrak's Northeast Direct, Lake Shore Limited, and Pennsylvanian routes serve this station, which has become profoundly dilapidated over the years and is in need of repairs and improvements to bring the station into compliance with Americans With Disabilities Act regulations. Amtrak shall work with the city of Erie and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to explore all funding match alternatives, and to begin renovation work on the station with all due speed. High-speed rail improvements outside the Northeast corridor .--The Committee directs Amtrak and the Federal Railroad Administration to determine what improvements would need to be made on the Washington, DC, to Richmond, VA, corridor to bring the line higher-speed rail service. Currently, the 107-mile distance between Richmond and Washington takes approximately 2 hours on Amtrak, an average speed of 53 miles per hour. Amtrak is directed to report its findings to the Committee no later than March 31, 1999. The study shall include an analysis of current and potential ridership, cost-sharing strategies, necessary capital improvements, track use agreement issues, and a cost-benefit analysis for each outlined option. The Committee recommends that Amtrak use up to $250,000 of the funds provided in this appropriation to prepare this study. GENERAL PROVISIONS The Committee has included the following general provision relating to Amtrak funding and operations. Section 325.-- Public disclosure of Amtrak ticket subsidy. --The Committee believes that Amtrak should provide each passenger with a clear and unambiguous description of the American taxpayers' support for its operations. In its recent analysis of Amtrak's route system, the General Accounting Office calculated Amtrak's average per passenger loss by using Amtrak's fully allocated costs and the ridership on its core intercity passenger service. The Committee believes that this method produces a meaningful indication of Amtrak's operating performance. Accordingly, the bill requires Amtrak to incorporate this method of calculating its per passenger loss in its disclosure to passengers. Further, the bill requires Amtrak to verify its calculation with the General Accounting Office. The Committee expects that Amtrak will convey its per passenger loss and continuing need for support from the American taxpayers using the following language: ``The American taxpayer subsidized this railroad ticket. Amtrak lost an average of $47 per passenger in fiscal year 1997.'' Amtrak would be expected to update the disclosure contained on passenger tickets with the latest annual data. FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION SUMMARY OF FISCAL YEAR 1999 PROGRAM The Federal Transit Administration was established as a component of the Department of Transportation by Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1968, effective July 1, 1968, which transferred most of the functions and programs under the Federal Transit Act of 1964, as amended (78 Stat. 302; 49 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.), from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The missions of the Federal Transit Administration are: to assist in the development of improved mass transportation facilities, equipment, techniques, and methods; to encourage the planning and establishment of urban mass transportation services needed for economical and desirable urban development; to provide mobility for transit dependents in both metropolitan and rural areas; to maximize productivity of urban transportation systems; and to provide assistance to State and local governments and their instrumentalities in financing such services and systems. The current authorization for the programs funded by the Federal Transit Administration is contained in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century. Under the Committee recommendation, a total program level of $5,365,000,000 would be provided for the programs of the Federal Transit Administration for fiscal year 1999. The following table summarizes the Committee's recommendations compared to fiscal year 1998 and the administration's request: [In thousands of dollars] Program 1998 enacted\1\ 1999 estimate\2\ Committee recommendation Administrative expenses 45,738 48,142 54,000 Formula grants 2,500,000 3,709,235 2,850,000 University transportation research 6,000 (\3\) 6,000 Transit planning and research 92,000 91,900 98,000 Capital investment grants \4\2,000,000 \4\876,115 \4\2,257,000 Job access and reverse commute grants 100,000 50,000 Washington Metro 200,000 50,300 50,000 ----------------- ------------------ -------------------------- Total 4,843,738 4,775,692 5,365,000 \1\Excludes reductions for TASC pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66 and Presidential line-item veto. \2\The budget proposes funding all FTA programs from the ``Mass transit'' account of the highway trust fund. \3\Proposed to be funded within transit planning and research. \4\Limitation on obligations. ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES General fund Trust fund Total Appropriations, 1998\1\ $45,738,000 $45,738,000 Budget estimate, 1999 $48,142,000 48,142,000 Committee recommendation 10,800,000 43,200,000 54,000,000 \1\Excludes reduction of $124,000 for TASC pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66. The Committee recommends a total of $54,000,000 in budget resources funds for administrative expenses. The administration's request envisioned funding administrative expenses from the ``Mass transit'' account of the highway trust fund. Project management oversight activities, section 5327 .--The FTA's Project Management Oversight Program is intended to inform and assist FTA management and FTA grantees in carrying out their individual responsibilities as stewards of public funds under the Federal transit law. The Project Management Oversight Program encompasses project management oversight of major capital projects, and safety, procurement, management, and financial compliance reviews and audits of FTA grantees. There are approximately nine fixed guideway projects planned and in process that are expected to cost $1,000,000,000 or more. The DOT Office of Inspector General is in the process of auditing two of those projects. The Committee directs the OIG to track the progress of all fixed guideway projects of national significance and perform audits of those experiencing cost, schedule, or financing problems. To help fund this work, the OIG is authorized to draw $1,000,000 from FTA's project management oversight funds, as specified in the bill. FORMULA GRANTS General fund Trust fund Total Appropriations, 1998 $240,000,000 $2,260,000,000 $2,500,000,000 Budget estimate,\1\ 1999 3,709,235,000 3,709,235,000 Committee recommendation 570,000,000 2,280,000,000 2,850,000,000 \1\The administration request includes fixed guideway modernization. Formula grants to States and local agencies funded under this heading fall into four categories: urbanized area formula grants (U.S.C. sec. 5307); clean fuels formula grants (U.S.C. sec. 5308); formula grants and loans for special needs of elderly individuals and individuals with disabilities (U.S.C. sec. 5310); and formula grants for other than urbanized areas (U.S.C. sec. 5311). In addition, set asides of formula funds are directed to: a new grant program for intercity bus operators to finance Americans With Disabilities Act [ADA] accessibility costs; and the Alaska Railroad for improvements to its passenger operations. Within the total funding level of $2,850,000,000, the new statutory distribution of these formula grants is allocated among these categories as follows: Urbanized areas (sec. 5307) $2,548,190,791 Clean fuels (sec. 5308) 50,000,000 Elderly and disabled (sec. 5310) 67,035,601 Nonurbanized areas (sec. 5311) 177,923,658 Rural Transportation Accessibility Incentive Program 2,000,000 Alaska railroad 4,849,950 Section 3007 of the Transportation Equity Act amends U.S.C. section 5307, urbanized area formula grants by striking the authorization to utilize these funds for operating costs, but includes a specific provision allowing the Secretary to make operating grants to urbanized areas with a population of less than 200,000. Generally, these grants may be used for capital projects, and to finance planning and improvement costs of equipment, facilities, and associated capital maintenance used in mass transportation. All urbanzied areas greater than 200,000 in population are statutorily required to use 1 percent of their annual formula grants on enhancements, which include landscaping, public art, bicycle storage, and connections to parks. Section 3008 of TEA21 overwrites the Mass Transit Account Block Grants Program and replaces it with the Clean Fuels Formula Grants Program. The new program provides grants for the purchase or lease of clean fuel buses for eligible recipients in areas that are not in compliance with air quality attainment standards. TEA21 statutorily sets aside $50,000,000 of the total formula program funds for the new clean fuels program. The Committee is aware that several problems associated with heavy mass transit buses can be addressed through the use of lightweight composite primary structure. These problems include excessive road wear, fuel economy, brake wear, and difficulty incorporating clean fuel systems. The Committee encourages the Administrator to use $4,000,000 of the clean fuels formula funds to establish a composite bus structure demonstration program to validate long-term structural integrity and maintainability of composite primary bus structure in a transit operating environment. The elderly and disabled and nonurbanized areas formula grants programs have been reauthorized without any substantive changes. The following table displays the State-by-State distribution of the formula program funds within each of the program categories: FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, FISCAL YEAR 1999 APPORTIONMENTS FOR FORMULA PROGRAMS (BY STATE) State Section 5307 urbanized area formula apportionment Section 5311 nonurbanized formula apportionment Section 5310 elderly and persons with disabilities apportionment Total formula programs Alabama $11,448,978 $4,228,780 $1,160,647 $16,838,405 Alaska 2,084,859 630,602 185,871 2,901,332 American Samoa 89,880 52,397 142,277 Arizona 28,863,235 1,851,249 1,023,763 31,738,247 Arkansas 4,437,072 3,380,734 812,084 8,629,889 California 404,820,386 8,251,269 6,271,272 419,342,928 Colorado 31,175,375 1,761,316 794,916 33,731,608 Connecticut 35,537,313 1,597,680 910,339 38,045,332 Delaware 4,871,260 398,583 278,659 5,548,502 District of Columbia 19,766,462 276,620 20,043,082 Florida 121,835,003 5,304,280 4,233,062 131,372,345 Georgia 44,801,810 6,182,926 1,503,895 52,488,632 Guam 255,869 132,972 388,840 Hawaii 19,715,744 693,939 353,457 20,763,140 Idaho 2,611,707 1,400,002 361,628 4,373,337 Illinois 178,200,662 5,672,490 2,737,694 186,610,846 Indiana 28,038,909 5,479,496 1,438,171 34,956,576 Iowa 7,342,475 3,524,466 872,739 11,739,680 Kansas 6,877,235 2,803,601 732,264 10,413,100 Kentucky 14,117,305 4,628,133 1,112,476 19,857,914 Louisiana 23,605,365 3,827,801 1,116,063 28,549,229 Maine 1,873,536 1,847,063 451,211 4,171,811 Maryland 66,793,154 2,305,970 1,121,323 70,220,447 Massachusettes 97,110,007 2,471,299 1,613,444 101,194,750 Michigan 50,670,971 6,692,700 2,342,839 59,706,510 Minnesota 25,338,046 3,851,262 1,137,080 30,326,388 Mississippi 4,031,432 3,758,332 789,061 8,578,825 Missouri 28,788,463 4,485,729 1,458,410 34,732,602 Montana 1,976,281 1,134,112 332,096 3,442,489 Nebraska 7,022,250 1,711,231 517,396 9,250,877 Nevada 15,616,798 558,691 385,885 16,561,374 New Hampshire 2,768,934 1,479,267 364,757 4,612,959 New Jersey 150,533,752 2,115,039 1,936,285 154,585,075 New Mexico 5,915,986 1,662,741 455,491 8,034,218 New York 455,065,563 7,445,190 4,481,782 466,992,534 North Carolina 22,137,693 7,908,991 1,709,831 31,756,515 North Dakota 1,926,497 838,726 283,256 3,048,479 Northern Mariana Islands 83,293 52,189 135,482 Ohio 72,161,826 8,051,902 2,856,940 83,070,668 Oklahoma 9,323,663 3,442,105 960,541 13,726,309 Oregon 22,267,054 2,733,062 893,273 25,893,390 Pennsylvania 125,058,247 8,981,981 3,424,587 137,464,814 Puerto Rico 38,115,924 2,684,099 847,585 41,647,607 Rhode Island 8,372,466 343,837 402,028 9,118,332 South Carolina 9,650,172 3,958,489 928,595 14,537,257 South Dakota 1,389,716 1,022,342 305,582 2,717,640 Tennessee 18,996,990 5,109,957 1,369,761 25,476,709 Texas 131,378,560 10,788,540 3,536,745 145,703,845 Utah 17,042,862 774,992 424,725 18,242,578 Vermont 698,431 914,062 253,268 1,865,761 Virgin Islands 195,639 135,122 330,761 Virginia 51,284,500 4,530,472 1,424,809 57,239,782 Washington 68,412,549 3,174,445 1,278,234 72,865,228 West Virginia 3,367,205 2,699,193 679,558 6,745,956 Wisconsin 29,244,129 4,663,889 1,304,931 35,212,950 Wyoming 965,020 652,297 215,996 1,833,313 --------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------ ------------------------ Subtotal 2,535,449,837 177,034,040 67,035,601 2,779,519,477 Oversight 12,740,954 889,618 13,630,572 --------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------ ------------------------ Total 2,548,190,791 177,923,658 67,035,601 2,793,150,050 =================================================== ================================================= ================================================================== ======================== Alaska Railroad 4,849,950 Clean Fuels 50,000,000 Rural Transportation Accessibility Incentive Program 2,000,000 --------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------ ------------------------ Grand total 2,850,000,000 Coordination between public transit agencies and human service agencies .--The Committee notes the success that Madison METRO in Madison, WI, has had in coordinating with the State and county officials on the provision of nonemergency Medicaid transportation. The Madison experience contains valuable lessons and should be shared with other public transit providers, particularly since many areas have had difficulty achieving a coordinated effort. In order to foster the best use of limited public resources, the Committee directs the Secretary of Transportation, working with the Secretary of Health and Human Services through the DOT/HHS Coordinating Council, to advance joint efforts to create State and regional planning guidelines which promote transportation coordination between public transit agencies and human service transportation providers. The joint planning guidelines task force, which was created to tackle this issue, is further encouraged to work collaboratively with Madison METRO and the coalition for paratransit solutions to ensure timely public transit agency input and dissemination of the planning guidelines. UNIVERSITY TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH General fund Trust fund Total Appropriations, 1998 $6,000,000 $6,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 (\1\) (\1\) Committee recommendation 1,200,000 $4,800,000 6,000,000 \1\Proposed to be funded within transit planning and research accounts. Section 5505 of TEA21 provides authorization for the university transportation centers program. The purpose of the university transportation centers program is to become a national resource and focal point for the support and conduct of research and training concerning the transportation of passengers and property. The Committee action provides $6,000,000 for the university transportation centers program, the same level as provided in fiscal year 1998. TRANSIT PLANNING AND RESEARCH General fund Trust fund Total Appropriations, 1998\1\ $92,000,000 $92,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 (highway trust fund) $91,900,000 91,900,000 Committee recommendation 19,800,000 78,200,000 98,000,000 \1\Excludes $500,000 reduction pursuant to Presidential line-item veto. The Committee action provides $98,000,000 for transit planning and research. The bill contains language specifying that $43,841,600 shall be available for the metropolitan planning program; $5,250,000 for the rural transit assistance program; $27,500,000 for the national planning and research program; $9,158,400 for the State planning and research program; $8,250,000 for transit cooperative research; and $4,000,000 for the National Transit Institute. Under the national component of the program, the Federal Transit Administration is a catalyst in the research, development, and deployment of transportation methods and technologies addressing such issues as accessibility for the disabled, air quality, and traffic congestion service and operational improvements. Funds for the State and local component of the program will ensure that all localities have sufficient funds to improve the State and local planning process and to participate in research efforts with regional applications. The administration's request proposes to fund the rural transit assistance program under formula programs and include university transportation centers under this ``Transit planning and research'' account. The following table summarizes the Committee recommendation: Fiscal year-- Committee recommendation 1998 program level 1999 budget estimate Metropolitan planning $39,500,000 $39,500,000 $43,841,600 Rural transit assistance program 4,500,000 5,250,000 State planning and research program 8,250,000 8,250,000 9,158,400 Transit cooperative research program 8,250,000 8,250,000 National Transit Institute 3,000,000 3,000,000 4,000,000 National planning and research program\1\ 36,250,000 26,900,000 27,500,000 University transportation centers 6,000,000 -------------------- ---------------------- ------------- Total 91,500,000 91,900,000 98,000,000 \1\Reflects $500,000 Presidential line-item veto in fiscal year 1998. The Committee action provides funding for a number of important initiatives in fiscal year 1999. They are as follows: National Transit Institute .--Of the funds provided, the Committee recommends $1,000,000 be committed to transit workplace safety training. Within the national planning and research program, the folowing projects have been provided specific funding levels in the bill: Calstart .--The Committee has provided $1,000,000 for two transportation technology projects in the State of California: the Santa Barbara Electric Transportation Institute and for the San Diego Clean Fuel Ferry Program. The Committee directs the Secretary to work with the CALSTART advanced transportation technology consortium to fund a feasibility analysis and preliminary implementation plan for clean fuel ferry service in the San Diego area. The Committee also notes that the Santa Barbara ETI is eligible for formula funding under the new clean fuels formula program and the capital investment grant bus set-aside program for clean fuels bus projects. City of Branson congestion study .--The Committee is aware of Branson, MO, severe traffic congesting and the urgent need to explore transportation alternatives. The Committee has provided $450,000 for the city of Branson to undertake a transportation investment analysis to develop and evaluate mobility alternatives. Special Olympics planning and assistance .--The Committee has provided $1,500,000 for transportation system support for the 1999 Special Olympics World Summer Games, to be held in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill Triangle in North Carolina from June 26 through July 4, 1999. This funding complements other Federal agency participation in the games, which will be the largest multisport event in the world during 1999. Skagit County north sound connecting communities project .--The Committee has provided $50,000 for the Skagit County Council of Governments North Sound connecting communities project (the Cascadia project). The Cascadia project will recommend enhanced intercounty connections to expanded service on the Northwest passenger rail corridor between Seattle and Vancouver, BC, including local and intercounty transit, auto, and passenger-only ferry service, intercity coach and airporter service. The allocation shall be matched equally with State, local, and private sector funds. Project Action. --The Committee recognizes the ongoing efforts of Easter Seals Project Action, and supports a continued active role for Project Action in the Federal Transit Administration's national planning and research program specialized transit services activity. Consistent with TEA21, the annual setaside for project action is increased from $2,000,000 to $3,000,000. Olympics security training and assistance .--The Committee has provided $1,000,000 for the Salt Lake City, UT Winter 2002 Olympics transit training and security programs. The funds will be used for training operators and mechanics of both bus and light rail operations, and for training security personnel for the Utah Transit Authority system and facilities. Desert air quality .--The Committee has provided $500,000 for a comprehensive analysis of air quality in Las Vegas, NV, by the Desert Research Institute, to develop a remote pollution sensing program to identify high-emitting vehicles, study air pollution transport from the Los Angeles Basin, develop emission reductions strategies, and study the impact of air pollution in desert climates. Vegetation control techniques on rail right-of-way .--The Committee has provided $250,000 for a survey of known effective vegetation control technologies currently in use on rail rights-of-way throughout the United States. Vegetation growth that encroaches on the right-of-way is a problem common to commuter and freight carriers throughout the county. However, many States are considering moratoria on herbicide use as public interest in pursuing alternatives to chemical control of vegetation increases. FTA is directed to work with the Federal Railroad Administration to conduct demonstration testing of vegetation control technologies in cooperation with commuter or freight railroad carriers that express interest in participating in this research program. Zinc-air battery .--The Committee recognizes that a demonstration program for alternative, renewable, and clean transportation technologies has been authorized for implementation in southern Nevada. This comparative framework provides valuable opportunity to assess the relative merits of these emerging technology options. Accordingly, the Committee directs FTA to provide $1,000,000 to continue and expand the zinc-air bus demonstration project in Las Vegas, NV. Virtual transit enterprise [VTE] .--The Committee has provided $1,400,000 for phase II of the virtual transit enterprise, a science and technology collaboration between the South Carolina Department of Transportation and the South Carolina Research Authority designed to improve efficiency and reduce the cost of operations of South Carolina transit providers through the use of distributed information technology. In addition to the initiatives listed above, the Committee reaffirms the transit planning and research grants from the national program that were contained in sec. 3012 of the Transportation Equity Act: North Orange-South Seminole County, FL, fixed guideway ITS application $750,000 Galveston, TX, fixed guideway ITS activities 750,000 Washoe County, NV, transit technology 1,250,000 Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority advanced electric transit buses and related infrastructure 1,500,000 Palm Springs, CA, fuel cell buses 1,000,000 Gloucester, MA, intermodal technology center 1,500,000 Southeastern Pennsylvania Transit Authority advanced propulsion control system 2,000,000 However, the Committee notes that, according to the ITS Joint Program Office, any and all of these projects could be funded within the intelligent transportation system program. TRUST FUND SHARE OF EXPENSES (Liquidation of Contract Authorization) (highway trust fund) Appropriations, 1998\1\ $2,260,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 ........................... Committee recommendation 2,446,200,000 \1\Includes $50,000,000 made available in section 607 of Public Law 105 78. For fiscal year 1999, the Committee has provided $2,446,200,000 in liquidating cash for the trust fund share of transit expenses associated with the following programs: administrative expenses, formula grants, university transportation research, transit planning and research, and job access and reverse commute grants. This level of funds is equal to the total budget authority from the highway trust fund inside the transit firewall as outlined in the transportation discretionary spending guarantee subtitle of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century. CAPITAL INVESTMENT GRANTS (Limitation on Obligations) (Highway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1998 $2,000,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 876,114,857 Committee recommendation 2,257,000,000 Section 5309 of 49 U.S.C. authorizes discretionary grants or loans to States and local public bodies and agencies thereof to be used in financing mass transportation investments. Under the Transportation Equity Act, investments may include construction of new fixed guideway systems; extensions to existing guideway systems; major bus fleet expansions; and fixed guideway expenditures for existing older systems. The administration's request proposes to combine the funding for bus and bus-related activities and fixed guideway modernization with the formula programs. Therefore, under the administration's proposal, only new fixed guideway systems or extensions--major capital investments--would be funded in this account. The Committee action provides a level of $2,257,000,000. Within this total, $1,805,600,000 is from the ``Mass transit'' account of the highway trust fund, and no more than $451,400,000 shall be appropriated from general funds. The following table summarizes the Committee recommendations: [In thousands of dollars] 1998 program level Fiscal year 1999 budget estimate Committee recommendations Bus and bus facilities 400,000 451,400 Fixed guideway modernization 800,000 902,800 New systems and new extensions 800,000 876,115 902,800 -------------------- ---------------------------------- --------------------------- Total 2,000,000 876,115 2,257,000 Three-year availability of section 3 discretionary funds .--The Committee has redistributed unallocated discretionary bus and new starts funds from projects which were funded in the fiscal year 1996 Transportation appropriations bill (Public Law 104 50) and previous acts making these funds available for reallocation in fiscal year 1999. As in previous years, a general provision (sec. 317) is included which limits funding availability for these fiscal year 1999 discretionary funds, except fixed-guideway modernization funds, to 3 years from enactment. Under the 3-year availability rule, funding provided in fiscal year 1996 for the following bus and bus-related projects will lapse if the grant recipients do not obligate the remaining unobligated funds by September 30, 1998. Remaining unobligated funds Norwich, CT, bus transfer/parking facility $1,488,750 Buffalo, NY, Crossroads intermodal station 496,250 Albany, NY, CNG buses 4,962,500 New Rochelle, NY, intermodal facility 744,375 Rensselaer, NY, intermodal station 5,843,750 Erie, PA, intermodal complex 3,970,000 Nashville, TN, electric buses 297,750 Peoria, IL, transfer facility 714,601 Arkansas, buses 794,000 Saint Bernard Parish, LA, intermodal facility 1,488,750 San Diego, CA, San Ysidro intermodal center 4,674,500 The Committee urges the grant recipients noted above to move swiftly to obligate these funds. When the transportation appropriations conferees meet later this year, any unobligated funds in the bus or new systems accounts that were earmarked in fiscal year 1996 or prior will be available for reprogramming under the 3-year availability rule. Honolulu buses and bus facilities .--Funds provided in Public Law 104 50 for the Honolulu/Oahu Kuakini Medical Center are reprogrammed for buses and bus facilities for the city and county of Honolulu, HI. BUS AND BUS FACILITIES The Committee recommendation for bus and bus facilities funding is $451,400,000, which is 20 percent of the total made available for capital investment grants. These funds may be used to replace, rehabilitate, and purchase buses and related equipment and to construct bus-related facilities. Under TEA21, there are three set-asides from bus funds within the allocation of discretionary bus grants: $3,000,000 is made available for the Altoona, PA, bus testing facility; $50,000,000 is made available only for grants that meet the 49 U.S.C. section 5308 Clean Fuels Formula Grant Program standards, and $4,850,000 is made available for qualifying fuel cell bus projects. The Committee has included bill language that delineates a number of eligible bus and bus facilities projects, and directs the Federal Transit Administrator to submit to the congressional appropriations and authorizing committees, within 60 days of enactment of the fiscal year 1999 appropriations legislation, a grant recommendation list choosing from among the projects listed in the appropriations bill. This list is inclusive of all bus and bus facilities projects that were included in the TEA21 legislation (sec. 3031), as well as projects that have been brought to the Appropriations Committee's attention as being meritorious and in need of Federal assistance. The Committee recommends the following projects for funding under this program. AC Transit electric bus program, CA Albany, NY paratransit buses and facilities Albuquerque, NM buses and bus facilities Alexandria, VA King Street Station access Alexandria, VA bus maintenance facility Allegheny County, PA buses and intermodal station Altoona, PA Metro Transit Authority buses Altoona, PA pedestrian crossover Altoona, PA Metro Transit Authority Logan Valley Mall suburban transfer center Anacortes, WA ferry terminal information system Anchorage, AK Ship Creek intermodal facility Arkansas statewide bus needs Armstrong County-Mid County, PA bus facilities and buses Atlanta, GA MARTA buses Austin, TX Capital Metro bus replacement Babylon, NY intermodal center Beaver County, PA transit facility Bellingham, WA Whatcom Transit Authority bus maintenance facility Berlin, NH Tri-County Community Action transit garage Birmingham, AL intermodal facility Birmingham-Jefferson County, AL buses Boston, MA Logan Airport intermodal buses Boston, MA Charles Street/MA General Hospital ``T'' Station Rehabilitation Boston, MA South Station intermodal center connection link Boulder/Denver, CO RTD buses Bradford County, PA Endless Mountain Transportation Authority buses Brattleboro, VT Union Station multimodal center Brazos, TX Transit Authority buses and facilities Bremerton, WA Sinclair's Landing, multimodal center Brockton, MA intermodal transportation center Brookhaven Town, NY elderly and disabled buses and vans Brooklyn-Staten Island, NY mobility enhancement buses Broome County, NY buses and fare collection equipment Broward County, FL buses Buffalo, NY Crossroads intermodal station Buffalo, NY Auditorium intermodal center Burlington, VT ferry terminal improvemets Burlington, VT multimodal center Butte, MT bus replacements California I 5 corridor intermodal transit centers Cambria County, PA bus facilities and buses Carroll County, NH transportation alliance buses Cedar Rapids, IA Ground Transportation Center Centre Area, PA Transportation Authority buses Chambersburg, PA Transit Authority buses and intermodal center Chelan, WA Chelan-Douglas multimodal center Chester County, PA Paoli transportation center Clark County, NV RTC CNG fueling facility Clark County, NV Regional Transportation Commission buses Cleveland, OH Triskett Garage bus maintenance facility Clinton, WA ferry terminal Colorado statewide buses Columbia, SC bus replacement Concord Area Transit, NH buses Corpus Christi, TX transit authority buses and facilities Crawford Area, PA buses Culver City, CA CityBus buses Dade County, FL Metro-Dade Transit Agency replacement buses Dallas, TX Dallas Area Rapid Transit buses Davis, CA Unitrans transit maintenance facility Davis/Sacramento CA hydrogen bus technology validation Dayton, OH multimodal transportation center Daytona, FL intermodal center Deerfield Valley, VT Transit Authority Demonstration of universal electric transportation subsystems (DUETS), bus system, NM Denver, CO Stapleton intermodal center Des Moines, IA intermodal facility Dothan, AL Wiregrass Transit Authority demand response shuttle buses and transit facility Duluth, MN Transit Authority community circulation vehicles Duluth, MN Transit Authority intelligent transportation systems Duluth, MN Transit Authority transit hub Dutchess County, NY Loop System buses East Hampton, NY elderly and disabled buses and vans El Paso, TX Sun Metro demand response, maintenance, and terminal facility Erie, PA Metropolitan Transit Authority buses Essex and Middlesex Counties, MA buses Eugene, OR Lane Transit District buses Everett, WA multimodal transportation center Fairbanks, AK intermodal rail/bus transfer facility Fayette County, PA intermodal facilities and buses Fayetteville, AR University of Arkansas Transit System buses Folsom, CA Railroad block project Fort Ord, CA multi-modal transportation center Fort Dodge, IA Intermodal Facility Fort Worth, TX buses Frankford, PA Septa transportation center Galveston, TX alternative fuel buses Gary, IN Transit Consortium buses Georgetown University fuel cell bus development and manufacturing Gloucester, MA intermodal transportation center Grand Forks, Fargo, Bismarck-Mandan and Minot, ND buses Grant County, WA buses and vans Greater Laconia, NH Transit Agency buses Greensboro, NC Transit Authority buses and vans Greensboro, NC multimodal center Harrison County, MS multimodal center/hybrid electric shuttle buses Harrisonburg, VA buses Hartford, CT transportation access project Healdsburg, CA intermodal facility Honolulu, HI bus facility and buses Hot Springs, AR transportation depot and plaza Humboldt, CA intermodal facility Huntington Beach, CA senior center shuttle buses Huntington, WV intermodal facility Huntsville, AL U.S. Space and Rocket Center intermodal facility Hyannis, MA intermodal transportation center Illinois statewide buses and bus-related equipment Indianapolis, IN buses Iowa/Illinois Transit Consortium bus safety and security Iowa statewide bus request Ithaca, NY TCAT bus technology improvements Jackson, MS buses and facilities Jacksonville, FL Transit Authority buses and mini transit center Jasper, AL buses Johnson County, KS bus maintenance/operations facility Kansas City, MO Union Station redevelopment Kansas City, MO two-way radios; farebox system; facility repair Keene, NH HCS community care buses and equipment King County/Kingdome, WA pedestrian bridges King County, WA Metro transit transfer facilities Lackawanna County, PA Transit System buses Lake Tahoe, CA intermodal terminal Lake Tahoe, CA alternative fuels station Lake Tahoe, CA coordinated transit system Lakeland, FL Citrus Connection transit vehicles/equipment Lane County, OR bus rapid transit Lansing, MI CATA bus technology improvements Las Vegas, NV RTC South Resort Corridor transit center Las Vegas, NV Citizen Area Transit System Las Cruces, NM buses, facilities and park and ride Lebanon, NH advance transit buses Lee County, AL buses Little Rock, AR Central Arkansas Transit buses Little Rock, AR New Harbor Inlet intermodal center Livermore-Ardmore Valley, CA automatic vehicle locator program Long Island, NY CNG transit vehicles and facilities Long Island, NY bus replacement Long Beach, NY central bus facility Los Angeles County, CA Foothills transit buses Los Angeles County, CA Metropolitan Transportation Authority bus replacement Los Angeles, CA Foothills transit bus maintenance facility Los Angeles, CA San Fernando Valley smart shuttle buses Los Angeles, CA Union Station Gateway intermodal transit center Los Angeles, CA municipal transit operators consortium Louisiana statewide bus request Louisville, Kentucky University of Louisville and River City buses Lynchburg, VA buses Market Street, NJ bus maintenance facility Maryland statewide bus facilities and buses Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority statewide bus replacement Mercer County, PA buses Miami-Dade, FL buses Miami Beach, FL electric shuttle service Michigan statewide buses Milwaukee, WI train station improvements Milwaukee County, WI buses Mineola/Hicksville, NY LIRR intermodal centers Minnesota Metro transit buses Minnesota I 35 corridor transit stations Missouri statewide bus and bus facilities Mobile, AL bus replacement Mobile, AL intermodal facilities Modesto, CA bus maintenance facility Monroe County, PA Transportation Authority buses Monroe, LA maintenance facility Monterey, CA Monterey-Salinas buses Montgomery, AL Union Station intermodal center and buses Morongo Basin, CA Transit Authority bus facility Mount Vernon, WA multimodal center New York City, CNG buses and refueling station New Orleans, LA RTA maintenance facility New York, NY West 72nd St. intermodal station New Jersey statewide buses and bus facilities New Hampshire statewide transit systems New Haven, CT bus facility New Bedford/Fall River, MA mobile access to health care New Rochelle, NY intermodal center New Mexico statewide buses and bus facilities, including northern New Mexico park and ride New Jersey Transit jitney shuttle buses Newark, NJ Morris and Essex Station access and buses Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority Hublink, NY North Slope Borough, AK buses North Carolina statewide buses and bus facilities North Dakota statewide buses and bus-related facilities Northern Kentucky Area Development District senior citizen buses Northstar Corridor, MN intermodal facilities and buses Norwich, CT buses Oak Park, IL Marion Street multimodal transit center OATS Transit, MO Ogden, UT Intermodal Center Ohio statewide buses and bus facilities Oklahoma statewide bus facilities and buses Olympia, WA bus replacement Olympic Peninsula, WA International Gateway transportation center Omnitrans, CA replacement buses Oneida County, NY Union Station intermodal facility Oneida County, NY buses and equipment Orlando, FL Lynx buses and bus facilities Orlando, FL Downtown intermodal facility Pee Dee, SC Regional Transportation Authority Pennsylvania statewide request for small communities Perris, CA bus maintenance facility Phenix City, AL express transit system Philadelphia, PA Market Street bus maintenance facility Philadelphia, PA Frankford transportation center Philadelphia, PA Septa ADA bus acquisition Philadelphia, PA 30th Street intermodal station Philadelphia, PA regional transportation system for elderly and disabled Phoenix, AZ alternatively fueled buses Pittsfield, MA intermodal center Portland, OR Tri-Met buses Potomac and Rappahanock, VA Trans Commission buses Poughkeepsie, NY intermodal facility Prichard, AL bus transfer facility Providence, RI buses and bus maintenance facility Rankin County, MI Intermodal Connector Reading, PA BARTA intermodal transportation facility Red Rose, PA transit bus terminal Reno, NV RTC transit passenger and facility security improvements Rensselear, NY intermodal facility Rhode Island Public Transit Authority buses Rialto, CA Metrolink depot Richland, WA Ben Franklin Transit maintenance, operation, and administration facility Richmond, VA Main Street station Richmond, VA GRTC bus maintenance facility Riverhead, NY elderly and disabled buses and vans Riverside, CA Transit Agency buses, facilities and ITS applications Roanoke, VA buses Robinson, PA Towne Center intermodal facility Rochester-Genessee, NY CNG buses Rochester, NY Rochester central bus facility Rogue Valley, OR transit district bus purchase Rome, NY intermodal center Rural Texas bus replacement Sacramento, CA intermodal station Sacramento, CA CNG buses Salem, OR area mass transit buses San Francisco, CA Islais Creek maintenance facility San Joaquin, CA buses and facilities San Juan, Puerto Rico intermodal access Santa Clarita, CA facilities and buses Santa Cruz, CA bus facility Santa Rosa/Cotati, CA intermodal transportation facilities Santa Clara, CA Valley Transportation Authority buses Savannah, GA Chatham buses and bus facilities Savannah, GA downtown multimodal center Seattle RTA buses Seattle, WA intermodal transportation terminal Seward, AK intermodal facility Shelter Island, NY elderly and disabled buses and vans Sinclair Landing transit facility, WA Sioux Falls, SD buses Sioux City, IA park and ride bus facility Smithtown, NY elderly and disabled buses and vans Solano Links, CA intercity transit consortium Solano County, CA automated vehicle locator Somerset County, PA bus facilities and buses Sonoma County, CA intermodal center South Bend, IN urban intermodal transportation facility South Carolina statewide Virtual Transit Enterprise South Dakota computerized bus dispatch system, radios, money boxes, lift replacements South Amboy, NJ regional intermodal transportation initiative South Dakota statewide bus facilities and buses Southampton, NY elderly and disabled buses and vans Southeast Missouri transportation services Southold, NY elderly and disabled buses and vans Spartanburg, SC intermodal facility Springfield, MA Union Station Springfield/Branson, MO bus terminal St. Louis, MO Bi-state intermodal center St. Louis, MO Care-Cab St. Louis, MO Bi-State development agency bus replacement Suffolk County, NY elderly and disabled buses and vans Syracuse, NY CNG buses and facilities Tacoma, WA Tacoma Dome station Tampa, FL Hartline buses Tampa, FL Ybor intermodal station (Hillsborough Area Regional Transit Authority) Tennessee statewide bus and facility replacement Texas statewide small urban and rural buses Tompkins County, NY new technology project Towamencin Township, PA intermodal bus transportation center Tucson, AZ alternatively fueled buses Tuscaloosa, AL intermodal center Ukiah, CA transportation center Ulster County, NY bus garage and equipment University of North Alabama, pedestrian walkways Utah Olympics park and ride lots Utah Olympics intermodal transportation centers Utah Hybrid electric vehicle bus purchase Utah Transit Authority/Park City Transit, UT buses Utah Transit Authority, UT intermodal facilities Utica and Rome, NY bus facilities and buses Utica, NY Union Station Vancouver, WA C-Tran Seventh Street transit center expansion Vancouver, WA I 5 park and ride lots Vermont statewide bus needs Volusia County, FL bus systems integrated fleet operations system Washington County, PA intermodal facilities Washington, Community Transit bus replacement Washington statewide buses Washington RTA buses Washington, D.C. intermodal transportation center Washoe County, NV transit improvements Waterbury, CT bus facility Waukesha, WI downtown transit center West Virginia statewide intermodal facility and buses Westchester County, NY DOT articulated buses Westchester County, NY Bee-Line transit system shuttle buses and fareboxes Westfield, MA intermodal center Westmoreland County, PA intermodal facility Wilkes-Barre, PA intermodal facility Williamsport, PA bus facility Wilsonville, OR buses and bus shelters Windsor, CA intermodal facility Wisconsin statewide bus facilities and buses Woodland Hills, CA Warner Center transportation hub Worcester, MA Union Station intermodal transportation center Yonkers, NY intermodal facility Yosemite area, CA regional transportation strategies FIXED GUIDEWAY MODERNIZATION The Committee recommends a total of $902,800,000 for the modernization of existing rail transit systems. Under TEA21 all of the funds are distributed by formula. The following table itemizes the fiscal year 1999 rail modernization allocations by State: Fixed guideway modernization apportionments State Apportionment Alabama ........................... Alaska ........................... American Samoa ........................... Arizona $1,240,236 Arkansas ........................... California 83,594,745 Colorado 1,132,463 Connecticut 34,548,995 Delaware 661,223 District of Columbia 28,912,935 Florida 11,206,655 Georgia 15,834,034 Guam ........................... Hawaii 498,050 Idaho ........................... Illinois 108,868,175 Indiana 7,307,446 Iowa ........................... Kansas ........................... Kentucky ........................... Louisiana 2,648,872 Maine ........................... Maryland 21,397,326 Massachusetts 59,250,813 Michigan 361,728 Minnesota 2,694,403 Mississippi ........................... Missouri 1,695,212 Montana ........................... Nebraska ........................... Nevada ........................... New Hampshire ........................... New Jersey 81,197,462 New Mexico ........................... New York 300,062,837 North Carolina ........................... North Dakota ........................... Ohio 14,775,328 Oklahoma ........................... Oregon 2,483,658 Pennsylvania 94,063,790 Puerto Rico 1,468,302 Rhode Island 1,833,110 South Carolina ........................... South Dakota ........................... Tennessee 47,600 Texas 4,607,963 Utah ........................... Vermont ........................... Virgin Islands ........................... Virginia 504,285 Washington 12,613,895 West Virginia ........................... Wisconsin 517,458 Wyoming ........................... 896,029,000 Oversight 6,771,000 902,800,000 NEW SYSTEMS The bill provides $902,800,000 for new starts. These funds are available for preliminary engineering, right-of-way acquisition, project management, oversight, and construction for new systems and extensions. According to specific project needs, these funds shall also be available for preliminary stages of projects named for funding. Under section 3009(g) of TEA21, there is an 8-percent statutory cap on the amount made available for activities other than final design and construction--that is, alternatives analysis, environmental impact statements, preliminary engineering, major investment studies, and other predesign and preconstruction activities. Within the total of $902,800,000 for new systems, no more than $72,224,000 may be allocated for these activities. The funds are to be distributed as follows: Project Recommendation Alaska and/or Hawaii ferry projects $10,400,000 Albuquerque/Santa Fe regional multimodal transportation 2,500,000 Albuquerque light rail project 10,000,000 Atlanta--MARTA North Springs project 55,000,000 Austin Capital Metro preliminary engineering 2,000,000 Baltimore central downtown MIS 1,000,000 Baltimore light rail double-track project 2,000,000 BART to San Francisco Airport extension and San Jose Tasman West extension 37,600,000 Birmingham light rail feasibility study 1,000,000 Boston North-South rail link 1,000,000 Boston--South Boston Piers MOS 2 project 53,983,000 Boston urban ring 1,500,000 Burlington-Essex, VT, commuter rail 4,000,000 Charleston, SC, monobeam rail project 3,000,000 Charlotte, NC, North-South Corridor Transitway 3,000,000 Chicago Metra commuter rail extensions and upgrades 19,000,000 Chicago CTA Ravenswood and Douglas Branch Lines 4,000,000 Cincinnati Northeast/Northern Kentucky rail line 3,600,000 Cleveland Berea red line MIS 1,000,000 Cleveland Euclid corridor improvement project 4,000,000 Colorado--North Front Range corridor feasibility study (Greeley-Fort Collins) 500,000 Dallas DART north central light rail extension 20,500,000 Denver southwest corridor light rail project 40,000,000 Denver southeast corridor multimodal corridor 1,000,000 Fort Lauderdale, FL, Tri-County commuter rail 10,000,000 Fort Worth Railtran 12,000,000 Galveston, TX, rail trolley system extension 1,000,000 Harrisburg, PA, capitol area transit/corridor one 2,000,000 Hartford, CT light rail 3,300,000 Honolulu major investment analysis 1,000,000 Houston Metro regional bus plan 59,670,000 Jacksonville light rail/bus corridors study 1,000,000 Johnson County, KS, I 35 commuter rail project 1,500,000 Kansas City, MO, commuter rail study 500,000 Kenosha-Racine-Milwaukee, WI, commuter rail 1,000,000 King County, WA Elliott Bay water taxi 250,000 Knoxville, TN, transit program 2,000,000 Largo, MD, Metro extension 2,000,000 Las Vegas resort corridor fixed guideway system 4,000,000 LIRR East Side access project, New York 40,000,000 Little Rock, AR, Arkansas River rail project 4,000,000 Los Angeles MOS 3 project 30,000,000 MARC commuter rail improvements 17,000,000 Memphis Medical Center rail extension 2,200,000 Massachusetts North Shore corridor project 1,500,000 Miami Metrorail Palmetto extension 3,000,000 Miami East-West corridor 4,000,000 Miami North corridor transitway to Broward County 8,000,000 Morgantown, WV, fixed guideway modernization 4,500,000 Nashville regional commuter rail 2,500,000 New Jersey urban core Hudson-Bergen light rail 70,000,000 New Jersey urban core Newark-Elizabeth Rail Link 12,000,000 New London, CT waterfront access project 1,000,000 New York City, Kennedy class ferryboat replacement 12,000,000 Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority light rail car rebuild 2,000,000 Norfolk-Virginia Beach corridor 20,000,000 Northern Indiana commuter rail (south shore) project 6,000,000 Old Saybrook-Hartford rail extension project 500,000 Orlando Lynx light rail project 20,000,000 Philadelphia to Pittsburgh high-speed magnetic levitation 500,000 Philadelphia-Reading SEPTA Schuylkill Valley Metro 6,500,000 Philadelphia SEPTA Cross County Metro 1,000,000 Pittsburgh Allegheny County Stage II light rail 5,000,000 Pittsburgh Airborne Shuttle System 5,000,000 Pittsburgh North Shore central business district MIS 1,000,000 Portland Westside and South-North light rail projects 26,700,000 Puget Sound RTA Link light rail 13,000,000 Puget Sound RTA Sounder commuter rail 47,000,000 Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill Triangle Transit 14,000,000 Sacramento South corridor LRT extension 23,480,000 Salt Lake City South light rail project 70,000,000 Salt Lake City/Airport to University (West-East) light rail 8,000,000 San Diego-Mission Valley and Mid-Coast Corridors 5,000,000 San Juan Tren Urbano 19,967,000 Santa Fe rail link 2,000,000 Sioux City micro rail trolley system, planning 250,000 South DeKalb-Lindbergh Corridor LRT 1,000,000 Southeast Michigan commuter rail viability study 200,000 St. George Terminal project, NY 10,000,000 St. Louis METRO Link/St. Clair County (IL) LRT 35,000,000 St. Louis-Jefferson City-Kansas City, MO commuter rail 500,000 Stamford, CT fixed guideway connector 2,700,000 Tampa Bay regional rail project 1,000,000 Whitehall Ferry Terminal, NY 15,000,000 Note. --Of the funds provided for Los Angeles Metro Rail, $24,000,000 are reprogrammed from funds provided in fiscal year 1998. PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS Alaska and/or Hawaii ferry .--The Committee recommends $10,400,000 for Alaska and/or Hawaii ferry projects. Section 3009 of TEA21 authorizes $10,400,000 of new starts funds to be made available each year for capital ferry projects in Alaska and Hawaii. Eligible purposes include new fixed guideway systems such as ferryboats, extensions to existing systems, ferry terminal facilities, and approaches to ferry terminal facilities. The State of Alaska, due to its isolated nature, relies on ferries to connect many of the coastal islands and towns. The State operates the Alaska Marine Highway, a system of 17 vessels, primarily in the southeast part of the State. There are still a number of isolated communities in the State which rely on access by water or air, since a road system is simply not developed. The State of Hawaii is nearing the initiation of interisland ferry service to improve its transportation infrastructure. The addition of ferry service will provide an alternative to air-only options. Albuquerque/Santa Fe regional multimodal transportation .--The Committee recommends $2,500,000 for a regional major investment study to identify and establish both a near and long-term multimodal transportation system for the Albuquerque/Santa Fe region of New Mexico. The study shall provide a comprehensive assessment of travel corridors in northern New Mexico, and shall outline a full alternatives analysis for each of these corridors. The administration has not been responsive to directives from the Committee to perform this study that were contained in both the 1998 appropriations bill and 1998 supplemental appropriations bill, and the Committee expects that this funding provided herein will be promptly utilized for the regional transportation study. Albuquerque light rail project .--The city of Albuquerque has developed a proposed light rail system that is authorized in the new starts projects section of TEA21. The middle Rio Grande region of central New Mexico is the most rapidly growing area of the State, with population projected to grow to 1 million people by 2020, one-third more than currently live in the area. While the road system is being expanded, it cannot keep pace with the rapid growth and limitations of geography, including rugged mountains and large areas of tribal reservation lands. Air quality standards are becoming an increasing concern with this rapid growth. The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for major investment studies, preliminary engineering, right-of-way acquisition, and an environmental impact statement for a light rail system in the Albuquerque metropolitan area. Atlanta-MARTA North Springs extension. --The Committee recommends $55,000,000 for the Atlanta-MARTA North Springs extension project. This 1.9-mile, two-station extension from the Dunwoody Station to North Springs is part of the larger 9-mile, five-station North Line extension to the MARTA heavy rail rapid transit system. The segment from Buckhead to Dunwoody opened in June 1996. The North Line extension will serve the rapidly growing area north of Atlanta, and will connect this area with the rest of the region by providing better transit service for both commuters and inner-city residents. The local share commitment for the federally funded portion of this extension is 20 percent. The cost-effectiveness index is $5 per new passenger trip. FTA has determined that the grantee has the financial capacity to build and operate this project. An FFGA for the Dunwoody to North Springs segment was issued in December 1994 for $305,010,400 in section 5309 funds. The current cost estimate for the project totals $487,700,000. The sum of $208,146,866 has been made available in appropriated funds through fiscal year 1998. Austin Capital Metro--Northwest/North Central corridor. --The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for Austin Capital Metro for preliminary engineering for the proposed light rail project in north Austin, to serve the central business district, the State capitol, and the rapidly growing population and employment centers of the city. Capital Metro and the Texas Department of Transportation have recently completed a major investment study in March 1997 which identifies a 30-mile LRT as the locally preferred alternative. The initial cost estimate totals $182,300,000. Baltimore downtown central MIS .--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 to conduct a major investment study in Baltimore in the central downtown business district. This funding will allow Baltimore to study a range of available technologies and alternatives and, ultimately, to determine a locally preferred alternative, to address heavy traffic congestion in the core area of downtown. Baltimore light rail double track project .--The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for double-tracking existing rail line in the city of Baltimore, for the purpose of initiating light rail transit services. BART to San Francisco airport and San Jose Tasman west extensions. --The Committee recommends $37,600,000 for the BART to San Francisco airport extension and the San Jose Tasman west extension. Local officials in the San Francisco area have proposed a four-station, 8.7-mile extension of the bay area transit [BART] system from Colma to an intermodal station at Millbrae with a spur serving the San Francisco International Airport. The proposed route would serve the cities of south San Francisco and San Bruno, connect with the airport, and continue to Millbrae. However, BART is deferring letting construction bids on the south San Francisco and the San Bruno stations until later this year. The majority of the proposed route is to follow a combination of existing and abandoned railroad rights-of-way. An FFGA was issued in 1997, in the amount of $750,000,000. To date, Congress has provided $113,726,474 in appropriated funds for the project. The Committee has followed the progress of this line with great interest and some concern. The SFO Airport/Millbrae extension has incurred serious cost overruns, documented by GAO. Through the use of contingency funds and additional funds from the State of California, these costs are being met within the project budget. The Committee also notes that BART is projecting an initial fare on the SFO/Millbrae line of $4.50 one way from downtown San Francisco to the airport. This is the highest transit-to-airport fare in the country (average transit-to-airport fare is $1.50). The Committee is concerned that this high fare may reduce patronage below EIS projections. The San Jose Tasman LRT project consists of 7.6 miles of surface LRT from the northern terminus of the Guadalupe LRT in Santa Clara, west through Sunnyvale, to the CalTrain commuter rail station in Mountain View. The project will include 11 stations and will be double tracked except for partial single tracking between Mountain View and Lockheed Station. The west extension is estimated to cost $342,500,000. In 1994, Santa Clara County District entered into an FFGA totaling $182,750,000 for the west extension, and the requested funding for fiscal year 1999 under the FFGA is $35,000,000. To date appropriations totaling $124,080,786 have been made available for this project. Birmingham, AL, light rail feasibility study .--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for a transit alternatives analysis and feasibility study in Birmingham, AL. Birmingham is the most congested city in the State, and the city has been declared an EPA nonattainment area. Boston north-south rail link .--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for a major investment study, being conducted by the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority [MBTA], to examine transit options in the corridor between North Station and South Station in downtown Boston. The alternatives under consideration include various configurations of a rail tunnel which would permit through commuter rail trains to serve both downtown stations. Currently, MBTA commuter rail service is split into two completely separate services, one serving the North Station and one serving the South Station. A feasibility study on the proposed corridor was completed in 1995. Currently, the major investment study [MIS] is considering tunnel alternatives under the Boston central artery. Through fiscal year 1998, Congress has appropriated $250,000 for this effort. Boston-South Boston Piers MOS 2 project. --The Committee recommends $53,983,000 for the South Boston Piers Transitway project. This project consists of a 1-mile bus tunnel connecting South Station to the Fan Pier and to the World Trade Center. The tunnel will be used by electric trolleybuses and its construction is timed to coincide with the central artery/tunnel highway project now underway. The project is under construction. The local share commitment to this project is 20 percent. An FFGA was issued in November 1994, in the amount of $330,726,320. Through fiscal year 1998, Congress has made available $188,300,861 in appropriated funds. Boston urban ring. --The Committee recommends $1,500,000 for developing a preferred alternative for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority's planned circumferential corridor surrounding the Boston central core. Alternatives for this new service include various combinations of light rail, busways, and rapid transit service to new station stops on the existing radial system, and enhanced local bus service. All build alternatives require a tunnel under the Charles River and, depending on the alternative, bridges and/or tunnels at the Southeast Expressway in south Boston. Initial cost estimates range from $700,000,000 to $2,400,000,000. This project has received a total of $2,088,514 in past years' appropriations. Burlington-Essex, VT, commuter rail. --The Committee recommends $4,000,000 for the construction of a commuter rail line linking Burlington to Essex Junction. The commuter rail improvements in this corridor include track, tunnel, signal at grade crossing, and drainage improvements. In Burlington, the terminus would be the newly developed Main Street Landing/Union Station site. Hourly commuter rail service would be provided on the New England Central Railway right-of-way. The project includes the construction of stations with park-and-ride lots and integrated feeder bus service. Through fiscal year 1998, Congress has made available $4,983,828 in appropriated funds. Charleston, SC, monobeam rail project. --The Committee recommends $3,000,000 for the construction of a full-scale demonstration monobeam rail line linking the Charleston International Airport to the Charleston Coliseum/Convention Center. The preliminary cost estimates for the 1.2 miles of the distance between the coliseum and the convention center totals approximately $35,000,000, mostly from private sources. Through fiscal year 1998, Congress has made available $1,495,150 in appropriated funds for this project. Charlotte, NC, north-south corridor. --The Committee recommends $3,000,000 for the Charlotte, NC, north-south corridor. The city of Charlotte, in cooperation with the North Carolina Department of Transportation, is conducting an MIS to explore the feasibility of constructing a rapid transit system within the Charlotte-Mecklenburg County area. The South Corridor Transitway extends 13.5 miles from the Uptown Charlotte Transportation Center to Interstate 485 near Pineville, NC. The total estimated cost for the transitway is $250,000,000. The corridor is included in the Mecklenburg-Union Metropolitan Planning Organization's 2015 long-range plan. Through fiscal year 1998, Congress has appropriated $1,000,000 for this effort. Chicago Metra extensions and upgrades .--The Committee recommends $19,000,000 for three Chicago Metra extensions and upgrades: (1) double tracking the north-central corridor line, which was inaugurated in August 1998 and has already exceeded ridership projections. The line runs along Wisconsin Central Railroad line from Antioch and Franklin Park to downtown Chicago; (2) extending the southwest corridor, which runs on Norfolk Southern Railroad line from Orland Park to Chicago's Southwest Side; and (3) extending the system's service westward along Union Pacific Railroad line into Kane County, a rapidly growing suburban area with high employment growth. Metra is the country's second largest commuter rail, serving a population base of over 7.5 million. The Federal funds will be matched with a 20-percent local share. Chicago Transit Authority [CTA] Ravenswood and Douglas Branch lines .--The Committee recommends $4,000,000 for capacity expansion of the Chicago Ravenswood and Douglas Branch light rail systems. The Ravenswood line carries approximately 105,000 people daily. The area is experiencing rapid growth in ridership, and increased capacity is required to handle this growth. The funds provided will allow CTA to complete the major investment study and related environmental reviews for the capacity expansion project. CTA plans to lengthen existing platforms in order to accommodate trainsets of eight cars in length. The Douglas Branch of the Chicago CTA blue line is in immediate need of rehabilitation. The line is a century old, and already operating at reduced speed due to poor track and structure conditions. The Committee directs that, of the funds provided, the Ravenswood line shall receive $2,000,000 and the Douglas Branch line shall receive $2,000,000. Cincinnati Northeast/Northern Kentucky Rail Line project. --The Committee recommends $3,600,000 for the corridor extending from the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport through downtown Cincinnati to King's Island Amusement Park in Warren County, OH. This 33-mile corridor paralleling I 71 generally runs in a northeasterly direction, and so is referred to as the northeast corridor. The capital cost of the rail alternative range from $800,000,000 to $1,200,000,000. The project is currently in the system planning studies phase. Through fiscal year 1998, Congress has made available $6,996,308 in appropriated funds for this project. Cleveland Berea Red Line MIS .--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for a major investment study to determine transportation options to provide a direct link between downtown Cleveland, Hopkins International Airport, the International Exposition Center, and Baldwin Wallace College. The proposed Berea Rapid Transit extension, approximately 3 miles from the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority's airport station, is directly aligned with the local transit operator's red line rapid rail system. The MIS is also considering adequate walkup access and park-and-ride facilities to encourage greater use of the red line light rail transit system. Cleveland Euclid corridor improvement project .--The Committee recommends $4,000,000 for design and construction costs of the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority's 5.6-mile downtown corridor, incorporating exclusive bus lanes and related capital improvements on Euclid Avenue from Public Square in downtown Cleveland east to University Circle. The proposed project is known as the Euclid corridor improvement project [ECIP]. In addition, five stations along the existing red line will be relocated in order to spur economic development and improve access between the stations, surrounding neighborhoods, and employment centers. In November 1995, the GCRTA Board of Trustees selected the ECIP as the locally preferred alternative. The total capital cost estimate for the ECIP is $332,500,000. Through fiscal year 1998, Congress has appropriated $8,740,000. Colorado-north front range feasibility study .--The Committee recommends $500,000 for the north front range MPO transportation feasibility study. This study would propose alternative regional solutions to the growing safety, congestion, and air quality concerns in the traffic corridors among northern Colorado's population centers between Fort Collins and the Greeley areas and Denver. This study will explore a wide array of alternatives, including highway widening, intercity passenger rail alignment, and bus system improvements and any other modal option. Dallas-DART north-central light rail extension project. --The Committee recommends $20,500,000 for the Dallas-DART north-central light rail extension project. This project is a 12.3-mile, eight-station, $513,000,000 LRT extension to Plano. The southern 7.3 miles, from Park Lane to Richardson Transit Center, would be double tracked. The northern 5 miles will be double tracked as well. Dallas area rapid transit has completed a major investment study and the preferred alternative was selected in September 1994. The project is now in final design. The local share commitment to this project is 35 percent. The cost-effectiveness index is $13.50 per new passenger trip. FTA has assigned a financial rating of high to this project for both stability and reliability of the capital financing plan and operating financial plan. Through fiscal year 1998, Congress has made available $27,332,867 in appropriated funds for this project. Denver southwest corridor LRT. --The Committee recommends $40,000,000 for the Denver southwest corridor light rail transit [LRT] project. The total FFGA amount for this 8.7-mile LRT extension is $120,000,000. The extension will connect with the existing Denver central corridor light rail line from the I 25/Broadway interchange, and run over an exclusive, grade-separated right-of-way paralleling Santa Fe Drive, to Mineral Avenue in Littleton. This project is currently in the final design stage. The cost-effectiveness index is $3 per new passenger trip. Through fiscal year 1998, Congress has made available $24,415,144 in appropriated funds for this project. An additional $1,341,506 was made available from reprogrammed funds. Denver southeast corridor multimodal corridor .--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for the Denver southeast corridor, a proposed 10-station, 19.7-mile light rail transit system extending from an existing LRT station at I 25 and Broadway in Denver, along I 25 to Lincoln Avenue in Douglas County, with a spur LRT line along I 225 to Parker Road in Arapahoe County. The double track system will operate over an exclusive, grade separated right-of-way and connect with the existing 5.3-mile central corridor LRT line in downtown Denver. At I 25 and Broadway, the southeast corridor will also connect with the regional transportation district's southwest corridor LRT line which is currently under construction. The capital costs of the fixed guideway element is $479,700,000, including right-of-way acquisition, final design, construction, and acquisition of rolling stock. Fort Lauderdale, FL, tricounty commuter rail. --The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for the tricounty commuter rail project. The Tri-County Commuter Rail Authority [Tri-Rail] operates a 71-mile commuter rail system connecting Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach Counties. Tri-Rail's short-range program includes the addition of a second track and rehabilitation of the signal system. These improvements will reduce conflicts with Amtrak and CSX freight trains. The project is in the final design stage. The local share commitment to this project is 39 percent. The estimated total capital cost of the project is $573,100,000. To date, Congress has appropriated $51,281,075 in section 5309 funds for Tri-Rail improvements. Fort Worth Railtran .--The Committee recommends $12,000,000 for the Fort Worth Railtran commuter rail and intermodal transportation center project, which will provide a much needed commuter rail link between Fort Worth and Dallas. Service between Dallas and Arlington has already been initiated. These funds will allow Fort Worth's connection to this service beginning in 2000, and complete the Federal share of funding for the Railtran commuter rail project. Federal funds are matched with 70 percent local and State participation. Galveston rail trolley system. --The Committee recommends $1,000,000 to expand the existing Galveston Island rail trolley system by 3.2 miles, to connect the University of Texas Medical Branch, the island's largest employer, to downtown Galveston. The current system, which has been in continuous operation since 1987 was expanded in 1995 to provide service to the new waterfront development including hotels, restaurants, museums, cruise ship terminal, parking, and other facilities. The proposed project also includes the purchase of one additional diesel-electric vintage rail trolley replica vehicle, necessary switches, and station development. The total project cost is $10,000,000. The project received an appropriation of $1,993,530 for this project in fiscal year 1998. Harrisburg, PA, capital area transit/corridor one .--The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for final design and preliminary engineering costs associated with the development of a regional light rail system in the Harrisburg, PA, metropolitan area in a corridor which would ultimately link Lancaster to Carlisle via Harrisburg. The total cost is estimated at $56,000,000 and would consist of an initial 12-mile segment from Harrisburg Transportation Center to the Navy's Mechanicsburg, PA, installation. Hartford, CT, light rail project .--The Committee recommends $3,300,000 for the proposed light rail system in Hartford, CT, of which $2,300,000 is provided in section 340 of this bill. This system is to be built along the I 91 north corridor alignment, from North Meadows to the central business district of Hartford. Honolulu major investment analysis .--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for a major comprehensive transportation investment analysis in the congested Honolulu-Ewa corridor on the Island of Oahu. Over the next 10 years, person trips along the Honolulu-Ewa corridor are expected to grow to more than 600,000 daily. The region has significant geographical constraints, and all alternative modes of transportation must be considered in determining how best to accommodate the growing demands. Houston Metro regional bus plan. --The Committee recommends $59,670,000 for the Houston Metro regional bus plan. The estimated total for the project is $625,000,000. The plan, developed by Houston Metro, consists of a package of major improvements to the region's existing bus system. It includes major service expansions in most of the region, new and extended HOV (high-occupancy vehicle) facilities and ramps, several transit centers and park-and-ride lots, and supporting facilities. The individual elements of the plan are in various stages of development, from preliminary engineering to construction. The local share commitment to this project is 20 percent. The cost-effectiveness index is $3 per new passenger trip. FTA has determined that the grantee has the financial capacity to build and operate this project. An FFGA was issued for this project on December 30, 1994. A total of $378,257,998 has been made available from appropriated funds for this project through fiscal year 1998. Indianapolis northeast corridor. --While no funding is provided for this project in fiscal year 1999, the Committee is pleased to note that the $1,250,000 provided in fiscal year 1998 for a major investment study [MIS] has generated significant matching efforts at the State and local level as well as in the private sector. With a 30-percent State/local match, the MIS is underway, and private sector efforts have been undertaken to build the momentum for mass transit solutions to the traffic congestion that plagues the northeast corridor of Indianapolis. The Lilly Endowment is sponsoring a $500,000 community consensus process to build public support for mass transit, and a group of downtown Indianapolis business and governmental leaders have announced plans to move forward with the possible construction of a light rail/trolley system that would link major downtown destinations. If the MIS results in a recommendation of a light rail system for the northeast corridor, this downtown trolley system could ultimately become phase I of such an overall light rail system serving Indianapolis. In addition, the downtown trolley would be totally funded with local public and private sector dollars, and could reduce the amount of Federal support needed for the northeast corridor project. Jacksonville light rail/bus corridors study .--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for studies and environmental analysis for new mass transit corridors in Duval County, FL. An indepth regional transportation study completed in March 1997 identified four major transit corridors in the Jacksonville metropolitan area that show unique benefits for the traveling public and the greatest potential for significant ridership. Three of the corridors can support light rail, and the fourth can support express bus service. Environmental and other planning studies should be performed on each of the four recommended corridors. Johnson County, KS, I 35 commuter rail project .--The Committee recommends $1,500,000 for planning and design of a commuter rail project along the railroad tracks that parallel Interstate 35, extending from Johnson County into downtown Kansas City. I 35 cannot be widened and proactive Kansas local governments, along with the support of business groups, have identified commuter rail as the preferred option to avoid traffic gridlock. The I 35 highway use figures have shown a steady 6-percent annual increase over the past decade. The Kansas State Department of Transportation will provide matching funds. Kansas City, MO, commuter rail study .--The Committee recommends $500,000 for a study of the need for commuter rail service for the greater metro Kansas City area. The study will quantify the economic benefits that commuter rail would bring, congestion mitigation benefits, safety benefits, and the opportunity of an expanded labor pool. Kenosha-Racine-Milwaukee, WI, commuter rail extension .--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for a major investment study for the corridor linking southeastern Wisconsin and Chicago. A feasibility study examined extending rail service along 33 miles of rail right-of-way and instituting service on a daily basis with 10 trains in each direction. The study estimated that annual ridership would be 1,300,000, and improved travel opportunities between Kenosha and Milwaukee would reduce traffic on Interstate 94 by 290 vehicles per hour. King County, WA, Elliott Bay water taxi .--The Committee recommends $250,000 for King County, WA, to purchase a ferry boat and rehabilitate the ferry facility as part of the Seattle transit system. The Elliott Bay water taxi first ran in late 1996, during the Christmas holidays, and was activated in summer 1997 as a demonstration project. During these demonstrations, the average ridership was over 545 passengers a day. The funds provided herein will enable King County to purchase a permanent ferry boat and to rehabilitate the dock facility at Seacrest Park in west Seattle. Knoxville, TN, transit program .--The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for a trolley and light rail system in the downtown Knoxville area. The funds provided will initiate site planning, engineering, and environmental studies needed to finalize the design and begin construction of the parking facilities and pedestrian connections. Largo, MD, Metro extension .--The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for environmental studies, preliminary engineering, and final design of a 3-mile extension of the Washington Metro Blue Line from Addison Road to Largo Town Center in Prince George's County, MD. The State of Maryland has invested $10,100,000 for preliminary work on the project under an FTA letter of no prejudice. The project will reduce daily vehicle miles traveled by diverting almost 13,000 daily automobile trips to transit, and will add 2,700 parking spaces at two new stations, which will help relieve the parking capacity problem at the Addison Road Station. Las Vegas resort corridor, fixed guideway system. --The Committee recommends $4,000,000 for preliminary engineering and design for a proposed fixed guideway system in the Las Vegas, NV, resort corridor. There are two major components to the proposed fixed guideway system: a 18.4-mile core system running south from Cashman Field to the Stratosphere Tower, then branching out along Sahara Avenue and paralleling Las Vegas Boulevard south behind the valley's resorts. In addition, an extension to McCarran International Airport is planned. The regional transportation commission has requested FTA approval to enter preliminary engineering for phase I of the Las Vegas corridor. FTA has rated both the project's capital financial plan and its operating financial plan as medium. The initial cost estimate for this project is between $2,100,000,000 and $2,300,000,000. The local financial commitment for this project is 55 percent. The cost-effectiveness index is under $4.50 per new transit rider. Through fiscal year 1998, Congress has made available $4,983,828 in appropriated funds for this project. Long Island Rail Road East Side access project, New York. --The Committee has provided $40,000,000 for the East Side access project which will link the Long Island Railroad [LIRR] to Grand Central Station and New York's East Side. The funds provided are for right-of-way acquisition, construction management, project management, and related costs such as value engineering, constructability reviews, and peer review. The 63rd Street Tunnel, now used by subway trains, has a lower level built for future use by Long Island Railroad trains, and this link is expected to reduce the need for passengers to backtrack from Penn Station on New York's West Side to their destinations on the East Side. The projected total capital cost is $3,400,000,000. Federal and local funding shares have not yet been determined. Through fiscal year 1998, Congress has made available $19,935,314 in appropriated funds for this project. The New York MTA has demonstrated its ability to rapidly commit funds appropriated for this project. The Committee understands that the grantee has in place a professional East Side access project organization, divided according to functional responsibilities, led by a chief program executive, which is designed to ensure that appropriated funds are obligated efficiently. Little Rock, AR, Arkansas River rail project .--The Committee recommends $4,000,000 for the Little Rock, AR, river rail streetcar project, which utilizes an existing bridge over the Arkansas River to connect Little Rock to North Little Rock. The Central Arkansas Transit Authority has begun the process of converting the railroad bridge into a light rail passenger facility. Through fiscal year 1998, the project has received $2,000,000 in Federal funds. Los Angeles, MOS 3 project. --The 23-mile, $5,700,000,000 Metro Red Line rail project is planned as minimum operable segments [MOS's] for funding purposes. ISTEA defined MOS 3 to include three Metro Rail extensions including the north Hollywood extension, the East Side extension, and the midcity extension. An FFGA has been signed, committing $1,416,490,000 in funding. A revised and restated FFGA for the north Hollywood segment was signed in June 1997. Through fiscal year 1998, Congress has made available $571,527,593 in appropriated funds. The Committee recommends $30,000,000 for the Los Angeles MOS 3 project, toward completion of the system's north Hollywood Red Line extension. Of this amount, $24,000,000 is made available from funds previously provided for the east-side extension, which has been temporarily suspended by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's chief executive officer. An additional $6,000,000 in new budget authority is also provided. The Committee notes that the LACMTA has met the five requirements outlined in the fiscal year 1998 conference report (House Report 105 313) which had to be met in order to release funds made available in the 1998 appropriations act. The Committee notes that the FTA has accepted the recovery plan submitted by the LACMTA Board of Directors, which details how LACMTA will improve their financial and managerial ability to complete the two federally funded rail projects that are now in construction, MOS 2 and MOS 3. Under the recovery plan, work on the east-side extension and the midcity extension has been temporarily suspended. Over the 17-year history of Federal funding, the Los Angeles Metro Rail project has been troubled by cost overruns, mismanagement, and engineering failures. The Committee is supportive of efforts within Congress and at the local level to protect Federal investments in this project. The Committee is encouraged that the new management team, experienced in cost cutting, and the Board of the LACMTA, led by Mayor Richard Riordan, is committed to restoring long-term financial stability to capital projects and daily operations of the LACMTA. Maryland commuter rail [MARC]. --The Committee recommends $17,000,000 for the MARC commuter rail project. Planned system extensions would provide service to Washington, DC, from Frederick, MD. The extension of MARC service to Frederick consists of a 13.5-mile line which will operate on existing CSX transportation rail right-of-way. The MARC program also includes new equipment and station improvements. The local share commitment to this project is 20 percent. FTA has determined that the grantee has the financial capacity to build and operate the Frederick project, the new equipment, and make station improvements. An FFGA was issued for the Frederick extension and capital improvement projects in June 1995 for $105,251,373. To date, Congress has made available $87,633,965 in appropriated funds for this project. Memphis, TN, medical center rail extension. -- The Committee recommends $2,200,000 for the Memphis Medical Center rail extension project. The Memphis Area Transit Authority [MATA] currently operates the 2.2-mile Main Street trolley, a vintage rail trolley line in downtown Memphis. The Main Street trolley extension via the Riverfront loop was opened for service in October 1997. This line serves existing and proposed developments along the Mississippi River and connects with the Main Street trolley, Central Station, and North End terminal. The funds provided for the rail connection to the medical center will complete the downtown rail circulation system. Through fiscal year 1998, Congress has made available $5,745,788 in appropriated funds for the Memphis regional rail plan. Massachusetts North Shore corridor project .--The Committee recommends $1,500,000 out of available capital investment grant funds (sec. 340) for the Massachusetts North Shore corridor project. These funds will be utilized for a major investment study of an extension of the MBTA blue line to the North Shore communities of Lynn, Salem, and Beverly, MA. Miami Metrorail Palmetto extension .--The Committee recommends $3,000,000 for construction on the Miami Metrorail 1.4-mile Palmetto extension and passenger station. The project includes a 700-space park-and-ride facility. The new line, station, and parking facilities are slated to open for revenue service in 2001. All environmental studies, preliminary engineering, and final design work has been completed. Miami-Dade County is in the process of advertising for bids on the station/parking facility, obtaining right-of-way, and contracting for procurement of rails, ties, and other capital construction needs. Miami east-west corridor .--The Committee recommends $4,000,000 for the proposed heavy rail line linking the suburban area southwest of Florida International University to Miami International Airport [MIA], downtown Miami, and the Port of Miami seaport. The locally preferred alternative includes an 11.2-mile minimum operable segment of heavy rail running from the Palmetto Expressway to the Port of Miami, with a spur from MIA to the Miami Intermodal Center. Capital cost estimates for the project total $1,580,000,000. Preliminary engineering and the final environmental impact statement are currently being completed, and the funds provided in this bill will allow the Florida Department of Transportation to begin construction activities. Miami north corridor transitway to Broward County .--The Committee recommends $8,000,000 for the proposed heavy rail or busway link between the major urban communities of Broward County, FL, and the neighborhoods of northwest Dade County to Miami's existing Metrorail facility. The grantee, Metro-Dade Transit Agency [MDTA], is considering three transit alternatives along the NW 27th Avenue corridor: a one-lane reversible busway in the median of the road; a two-lane busway on the west side of the road; or an elevated metrorail extension. Preliminary capital cost estimates for the three options range from $58,000,000 for the one-lane busway to $473,000,000 for the metrorail extension. MDTA has completed a major investment study, and selected the NW 27th Avenue alignment as the locally preferred alternative. Alternatives analyses have been completed, and the final environmental impact phase began in May 1998. The funds provided herein will begin construction activities on the transit alternative that is selected by the MDTA. Morgantown, WV, fixed guideway modernization .--The Committee recommends $4,500,000 for the Morgantown people mover system, to replace the guidway's heating system. The system was first installed in 1971, and as the guideway system ages, several of its major systems are in need of replacement or upgrade. Nashville regional commuter rail .--The Committee recommends $2,500,000 for the Nashville for feasibility studies, a major investment study, and preliminary engineering on a commuter rail service connecting the downtown Nashville area with other areas in the Southeast region of the United States. The proposed commuter rail system would incorporate approximately five existing rail lines, and would be phased in over a 20-year period, with a mutual terminus in downtown Nashville. New Jersey urban core Hudson-Bergen project. --The Committee recommends $70,000,000 for the New Jersey urban core project-Hudson-Bergen light rail line. The urban core project consists of a number of rail improvements designed to improve mobility in northern New Jersey, and consists of the following segments: Secaucus transfer; Kearney connection; Northeast corridor signal system; improvements to New York Penn Station; Hudson-Bergen LRT; and Newark-Newark International Airport-Elizabeth transit link, which also includes a rail connection between the Penn and Broad Street Stations in Newark. The local financial commitment is accounted for through the ISTEA toll revenue credit provision. ISTEA earmarked $634,400,000 for the entire urban core program of projects. The Hudson-Bergen project is a 20.1-mile, 33-station at-grade LRT line from the Vince Lombardi park-and-ride lot through Hoboken and Jersey City to Route 440 in southwest Jersey City and 34th Street in Bayonne. The 9.6-mile initial operating segment is now under construction. New Jersey urban core Newark-Elizabeth rail link. --The Committee recommends $12,000,000 for the Newark-Elizabeth light rail project. Estimates of total capital costs are $694,000,000 for the 9-mile, 15-station light rail transit line linking the cities of Newark and Elizabeth as well as the Newark International Airport. The initial operating segment, a 1-mile connection between the Penn and Broad Street Stations in Newark, is in preliminary engineering and is expected to total $141,000,000. In January 1997, New Jersey State officials agreed to alter the alignment of Hoboken to the west of the city. An environmental assessment is currently underway to examine the environmental impacts of the change. Through fiscal year 1998, Congress has made available a total of $609,080,000 in appropriated funds for the New Jersey urban core projects. New London, CT, waterfront access project .--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for the city of New London to develop and implement a mass transit program that will improve access to the waterfront area of the city. New York City ``Kennedy'' class ferryboat replacement .--The Committee recommends $12,000,000 for the replacement of one Kennedy class passenger ferryboat running between Staten Island and Manhattan, NY. The replacement ferryboat will likely have the capacity to carry a limited number of automobiles, will increase the New York City ferryboat fleet's ADA compliance, and will reduce hydrocarbon and particulate emissions by using new clean diesel technology or compressed natural gas. The current ferryboat fleet averages 35 years in age, which is 10 years older than FTA's recommended replacement age for ferries. Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority light rail car rebuild .--The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for the Buffalo, NY, midlife rebuild project of light rail cars owned by the Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority. Under the expanded capital definition adopted by the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century, such preventive maintenance is an allowed capital cost, and will increase the life of the NFTA light rail car fleet. Norfolk-Virginia Beach corridor .--The Committee recommends $20,000,000 out of available capital investment grant funds (sec. 340) for the Norfolk-Virginia Beach corridor light rail project, a 25-mile line from the Oceanfront area in Virginia Beach to downtown Norfolk. Through 1998, the project has received $2,000,000 in Federal funds. The Tidewater Transportation District Commission has completed a major investment study, and preliminary engineering and environmental impact statement work is nearing completion. Northern Indiana South Shore commuter rail extension. --The Committee recommends $6,000,000 for the Northern Indiana South Shore commuter rail extension project. The Northern Indiana Commuter Transportation District [NICTD] operates the South Shore Line passenger service between South Bend, IN, and the Randolph Street Station in Chicago, IL. In order to meet the growing demand for commuter rail service in northern Indiana, appropriated funds to be matched with local funds, will be used for the purchase of additional passenger train cars. This effort is currently in the system planning study phase. Through fiscal year 1998, Congress has made available $4,483,573 in appropriated funds. Old Saybrook-Hartford rail extension project .--The Committee recommends $500,000 out of available capital investment grant funds (sec. 340) for the Old Saybrook-Hartford rail extension project. These funds will be utilized for feasibility studies, planning, and development of a railroad right-of-way between Old Saybrook and Hartford, CT. Orlando Lynx-Central Florida light rail project. --The Committee recommends $20,000,000 for the Orlando, FL, Lynx light rail project. The locally preferred alternative, selected in September 1995, includes highway improvements along a 75-mile corridor and a light rail transit [LRT] component along a 52-mile corridor at a capital cost of $2,700,000,000. A 25-mile minimum operating segment of the LRT is completing a preliminary engineering and draft impact statement [PE/DIS]. The proposed 26.8-mile, 27-station LRT project is estimated to have a capital cost total of $878,800,000. Through fiscal year 1998, Congress has made available $33,683,196 in appropriated funds for this project. Philadelphia to Pittsburgh high-speed magnetic levitation .--The Committee recommends $500,000 for a major investment study for the proposed State of Pennsylvania high-speed intercity magnetic levitation project between Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, that will incorporate an Americanized version of the German Thyssen Transrapid System magnetic levitation train technology. The guideway for the system will be heavy steel plate, presenting the opportunity for market growth in the U.S. precision fabrication industry. The system will be developed for American operational conditions, using American manufacturing methods and materials. This project will also receive funds from the new TEA21 magnetic levitation technology deployment program for the development of: intermodal transportation facilities on the system's right-of-way; right-of-way alignment finalization; a draft environmental impact statement; and magnetic levitation industry standards for communications, control, and power systems. Philadelphia-Reading SEPTA Schuylkill Valley Metro .--The Committee recommends $6,500,000 for line engineering and initial construction on the 62-mile commuter rail service to be instituted between Philadelphia and Reading, PA. The system plans to incorporate 28 stops. A feasibility study for the Schuylkill Valley Metro has been completed, and local funding of $5,000,000 has been approved to commence a major investment study this summer. Philadelphia SEPTA Cross County Metro .--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for the Cross County Metro corridor, which will extend approximately 48 miles from Glenloch, Chester County, PA, to Morrisville, Bucks County, along Conrail's existing Trenton cutoff freight rail-line. The project has received $2,400,000 in prior-year funding for preliminary engineering and design, and the feasibility study has been completed. A draft environmental impact statement is scheduled for completion in June 1988. The funds provided in this act are for further engineering and design work, and necessary right-of-way improvements. Pittsburgh-Allegheny County stage II light rail .--The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for reconstruction costs associated with bringing the Overbrook, Library, and Drake trolley lines in Allegheny County up to light rail standards. This effort will complete the last 12 miles of a 25-mile rail system serving Pittsburgh's southern suburbs. Pittsburgh airborne shuttle system .--The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for the low-speed urban magnetic levitation system in downtown Pittsburgh, to serve the North Shore and Oakland sections of the city, with stops at the Pittsburgh Technology Center, Carnegie Mellon, and Magee and Mercy Hospitals. Private financing of the project will provide 25 percent of the total cost of the project, which is estimated to be $498,400,000. The low-speed maglev technology is better suited to intracity transit service than many other alternative rail technologies because construction is not disruptive (the train runs along an elevated track of preform concrete and lightweight steel); the vehicle itself is lightweight, has tight turn capability; and can handle steep grades. Pittsburgh North Shore central business district MIS .--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for a major investment study to assess potential improvements in North Shore's access and link with the central business district and to enhance and support the private and public development currently underway along the Allegheny River corridor. Portland Westside and south-north LRT projects. --The Committee recommends $26,700,000 for the Portland Westside LRT project. Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation District of Oregon [Tri-Met] is a building light rail transit extension from downtown Portland, west through Beaverton, to a terminus in downtown Hillsboro. The total estimated cost of the project is $963,522,674. In downtown Portland, the 17.7-mile extension will connect to the existing Banfield LRT line [MAX] that operates between Portland and Gresham. In August 1997, 12 vehicles went into service on the existing line. Construction is nearing completion along the entire alignment. Tri-Met initiated revenue service to the project's first stations in August 1997 with full service over the entire line scheduled for September 1998. The local share commitment to this project is 27 percent. The cost-effectiveness index is $12 per new passenger trip. In September 1992, FTA and Tri-Met entered into a full funding grant agreement [FFGA] for the 12-mile segment from downtown Portland to 185th Avenue. The section 5309 new start share for this segment was $515,990,000. The FFGA was amended in 1994 to add the 6.2-mile Hillsboro extension, bringing the total section 5309 share to $590,060,336. An additional $40,000,000 was added to the project in fiscal year 1996. Through fiscal year 1998, Congress has made available $593,471,931 in appropriated new start funds. The Portland south-north corridor is a bi-State light rail line between the Clackamas Regional Center, OR, and Vancouver, WA which is currently in preliminary engineering. The proposed 20-mile light rail line would be broken into two operable segments, with the first segment connecting Clackamas to the Rose Quarter (12 miles). Capital costs for the complete south-north LRT project are estimated to be $1,360,000,000. Metro, the Portland area metropolitan planning organization, is scheduled to complete a final environmental impact statement for this project in October 1998. Puget Sound RTA link light rail .--The Committee recommends $13,000,000 for preliminary engineering, environmental analyses, siting, and design of stations and maintenance facilities, and development of station area plans for the light rail component of the Puget Sound regional transit system plan. The link light rail will complement the sounder commuter rail system in the Tacoma to Everett Puget Sound corridor. The light rail will run from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport to Northgate, utilizing an already-built downtown Seattle transit tunnel. A major investment study for the light rail project has already been performed. Total costs of the link light rail project are estimated to be $539,000,000. Puget Sound RTA Sounder commuter rail project. --The Committee recommends $47,000,000 for the Seattle-Tacoma-Sound Move light rail and commuter rail project. The three-county Central Puget Sound Regional Transit Authority [RTA] Board has adopted a 10-year regional plan. The estimated capital cost of the project is $3,068,000 and will cover proposed transportation improvements, substantial commuter rail service in the region (principally between Seattle and Tacoma) as well as LRT, and expanded bus service. A major investment study was completed in March 1997. FTA approved the initiation of preliminary engineering for the Central LRT project in August 1997. The draft environmental impact statement [DEIS] is scheduled to be completed in fall 1998. The local share commitment on the total project is 76 percent. FTA has rated both the financial plan and the operating plan as medium-high. Through fiscal year 1998, Congress has made available $20,920,851 in appropriated funds for this project. Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill Triangle Transit. --The Committee recommends $14,000,000 for the Research Triangle Park transit plan in Raleigh-Durham, NC. The phase 1 regional rail project is the proposed initial segment of a three-phased project that will link the three counties--Wake, Durham, and Orange--in the Triangle region of North Carolina in a 35-mile regional commuter rail system. In phase 1, the Triangle Transit Authority [TTA] intends to initiate regional rail service from Durham to downtown Raleigh and from downtown Raleigh to north Raleigh. TTA proposes to use diesel multiple unit rail vehicles to serve the 16 anticipated (phase 1) stations. The proposed project will use the existing North Carolina Railroad and CSX rail corridors to connect Duke University, downtown Durham, Research Triangle Park, RDU Airport, Morrisville, Cary, North Carolina State University, downtown, and north Raleigh. The capital cost estimate for phase 1 totals $250,000,000. The cost estimate includes: final design, acquisition of right-of-way and rail vehicles, station construction, park-and-ride lots, and construction of storage and maintenance facilities. TTA is currently in the preliminary engineering/environmental documentation phase. Through fiscal year 1998, Congress has made available $13,947,234 in appropriated funds for the project. Sacramento south corridor LRT extension. --The Committee recommends $23,480,000 for the Sacramento south corridor project, the full amount for fiscal year 1999 under the project's FFGA. The Sacramento Regional Transit District [RT] is developing an 11.3-mile light rail project on the Union Pacific Railroad right-of-way. RT has elected to phase the project. Phase 1, known as the interim operable segment [IOS], consists of a 6.3-mile, $220,000,000 LRT extension in the south Sacramento corridor. Phase 2 is also expected to cost $220,000,000. The local share commitment to this project is 50 percent. The cost-effectiveness index is $6 per new passenger trip. FTA has rated the capital financial plan for phase 1 as high. The administration signed an FFGA with Sacramento in June 1997 to provide a commitment of $111,200,000 in new start funds for the 6.3-mile extension. Construction is expected to begin in late 1998. Through fiscal year 1998, Congress has made available $28,168,442 in appropriated funds for this project. Salt Lake City south LRT. --The Committee recommends $70,000,000 for the Salt Lake City south LRT project. Utah Transit Authority [UTA] is constructing a 15-mile light rail transit [LRT] line from downtown Salt Lake City to suburban areas to the south. The LRT line will operate at-grade on city streets in the downtown and utilize a railroad right-of-way already owned by UTA to the south of downtown. Construction is well underway and the project is expected to be completed by December 2000. The local share commitment to this project is 23 percent. For fiscal years 1998 99, local match shall be determined according to section 3030(c)(2)(B)(ii) of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century [TEA21]. The cost-effectiveness index is $4 per new passenger trip. FTA has negotiated an FFGA with UTA committing $237,393,530 in new start funds to the project. Total cost of the project is $312,500,000. Through fiscal year 1998, a total of $129,986,471 has been made available by Congress in appropriated funds for this project. Salt Lake City/airport to university (west-east) light rail .--The Committee recommends $8,000,000 for developing a final environmental impact statement and beginning preliminary engineering on the proposed 10-mile light rail corridor extending from the Salt Lake International Airport east through downtown Salt Lake City and terminating at the University of Utah. The project will also connect with the north-south LRT line in the downtown area. Light rail vehicles will operate at-grade on tracks laid in existing city streets and on property owned by the airport and by the university. Total capital costs are estimated to be $374,000,000, with annual operating costs projected at $7,500,000. For fiscal year 1999, local match shall be determined according to section 3030(c)(2)(B)(ii) of TEA21. San Diego Mission Valley and midcoast corridors .--The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for design and engineering on the San Diego Mission Valley east light rail corridor project of which $4,000,000 is provided in section 340 of the bill. The Metropolitan Transit Development Board is planning to build a 5.9-mile extension from east of Interstate 15 to the city of La Mesa where it would connect to the existing east light rail line, now referred to as the orange line, near Baltimore Drive. The line would serve four new stations, and would include elevated, at-grade and tunnel portions. Total project capital costs are expected to be $332,000,000. The project also includes the midcoast corridor, a 10.4-mile extension along Interstate 5 from Old Town to North University City where it would connect with the Mission Valley and south LRT lines, now referred to as the blue line, and the coaster line at the Old Town Transit Center. This extension would serve nine stations. The Committee understands that the combined project was authorized for $325,000,000 in Federal funds in TEA21, and the Committee regrets that further funding was not available in this appropriations bill. However, the Committee notes that this is the first request for major Federal construction funding for the San Diego trolley system and recognizes the commitment of Congress for the full authorization by the year 2003. San Juan Tren Urbano .--The Committee recommends $19,967,000 for continuing construction on the 10.7-mile, 14-station rapid rail-line between Bayamon Centro and the Sagrado Corazon area of Santurce in the San Juan metropolitan area. The system consists of a double-track line operating over at-grade and elevated rights-of-way, with a short below-grade segment. The FTA issued a full funding grant agreement in March 1996 to provide a total of $307,410,000 to complete the project. To date, a total of $33,380,000 has been provided in Federal new starts appropriated funds. Santa Fe rail link .--The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for the rehabilitation and upgrade of existing track between the communities of Eldorado and Santa Fe, NM, (11 miles). These funds will provide for the acquisition and upgrade of track, and work on stations and stops along the route. Sioux City microrail trolley system .--The Committee recommends $250,000 for the initial planning and design of a Sioux City, IA, microrail trolley system, as included in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century. Existing track will be utilized in this downtown-riverfront light rail project. South DeKalb-Lindberg Corridor LRT .--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for preliminary planning and a draft environmental impact statement design for a proposed 14.5-mile light rail system in the south DeKalb County to Lindbergh, GA, Emory University transportation corridor. The Metropolitan Atlanta Regional Transportation Authority [MARTA] is currently examining route alternatives for this corridor. Southeast Michigan commuter rail viability study .--The Committee has provided $200,000 for a Wayne County, MI, study to consider the viability of a commuter rail-line along the route from Detroit Metropolitan Airport to downtown. St. George terminal project, New York .--The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for design and enhancements of the Staten Island Ferry terminal facility at St. George, Staten Island, and connecting intermodal areas. New York City has already spent nearly $5,000,000 on temporary repairs and slip work to keep the St. George facility operational, but the terminal remains in need of major new construction. The project received $2,500,000 in Federal transit funding in fiscal year 1998. St. Louis Metrolink (St. Clair County, IL) extension project. --The Committee recommends $35,000,000 for the St. Clair County corridor LRT. The initial operating segment [IOS] is a 17.4-mile extension between downtown East St. Louis, IL, and the Belleville Community College in St. Clair County, IL. The selected full project alternative is a 26-mile LRT extension with a total cost of $426,700,000. The FFGA new starts amount, toward the IOS is $243,930,961. The total estimated cost of the IOS is $339,200,000. The local share commitment to this project is 28 percent, and a medium/high rating for financial capacity has been assigned by FTA. The cost-effectiveness index is $23 per new passenger trip for the full 27-mile project. Through fiscal year 1998, $69,610,663 has been made available from Congress in appropriated funds for this project. St. Louis-Jefferson City-Kansas City, MO, commuter rail .--The Committee recommends $500,000 for a feasibility study on developing a commuter rail system between downtown Jefferson City to Kansas City, and downtown Jefferson City to St. Louis, MO. This study shall identify potential stops, ridership, and general viability of the project. Stamford, CT, fixed guideway connector .--The Committee recommends $2,700,000 for the city of Stamford for a major investment study of a mass transit connector in and out of the city's transportation center. Of this total, $1,700,000 is provided in section 340 of the bill. Tampa Bay regional rail project .--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 toward the completion of preliminary engineering and environmental assessments for the proposed Tampa Bay regional rail system, which would be 73 miles in length and incorporate expanded bus, pedestrian, and freeway elements. There is existing rail right-of-way available for the project. The project has been provided $4,000,000 in previous appropriations, and the project has completed a major investment study. Whitehall ferry terminal, New York .--The Committee recommends $15,000,000 for construction of a new Staten Island ferry/Whitehall ferry terminal facility and connecting intermodal areas in Manhattan. The Whitehall ferry terminal suffered significant structural damage in a fire in 1991, and needs to be replaced. The new terminal will be ADA accessible and will enhance the safety and security for the 65,000 passengers using the facility daily. The project will directly connect with the New York subway system, bus services, and highway users. The total cost of the project is expected to exceed $100,000,000. To date, the project has received $15,000,000 in Federal funds. MASS TRANSIT CAPITAL FUND (Liquidation of Contract Authorization) (Highway Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1998 $2,350,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 1,900,000,000 Committee recommendation 1,805,600,000 The bill includes $1,805,600,000 to liquidate obligations incurred under contract authority provided in section 5338(b) of 49 U.S.C. DISCRETIONARY GRANTS (highway trust fund, mass transit account) (rescission of contract authorization) 1998 appropriation to date ........................... 1998 rescission request ........................... Committee recommendation -$392,000,000 The Committee recommends a rescission of $392,000,000 in unobligated contract authority balances of ISTEA transit discretionary grants funds. These lapsed ISTEA funds could not be utilized under the new TEA21 authorization, because they would not be scored within the transit firewall. JOB ACCESS AND REVERSE COMMUTE GRANTS General fund Trust fund Total Appropriations, 1998 Budget estimate, 1999\1\ $100,000,000 $100,000,000 Committee recommendation $10,000,000 40,000,000 50,000,000 \1\Administration request includes job access funds within formula grants. In the fiscal year 1999 budget, the administration requested $100,000,000 for a new Access to Jobs and Training Program. The administration's reauthorization proposal, NEXTEA, contained legislation to establish a new activity to help welfare reform efforts succeed by providing enhanced transportation services for low-income individuals, including former welfare recipients, traveling to jobs or training centers. Section 3037 of the Transportation Equity Act established a new program for fiscal years 1999 through 2003, the Job Access and Reverse Commute Grants Program. For fiscal year 1999, the program is funded at a total level of $50,000,000, with no more than $10,000,000 coming from general funds and $40,000,000 coming from the ``Mass transit'' account of the highway trust funds. The program will make competitive grants to qualifying metropolitan planning organizations, local governmental authorities, agencies, and nonprofit organizations in urbanized areas with populations greater than 200,000. Grants may not be used for planning or coordination activities. No more than $10,000,000 of the total program may be released for reverse commute grants (urban to suburban employment opportunities). Within the funds provided for reverse commute grants, $500,000 shall be reserved for applications from the city of Philadelphia, PA, and $500,000 shall be reserved for applications from the city of Pittsburgh, PA, or from local authorities, agencies, and organizations within these cities. At least $40,000,000 of the funds are to be used for grants that provide access to jobs, that is, the transportation of welfare recipients and eligible low-income individuals to and from jobs and employment-related activities. Within the funds provided for job access grants, $500,000 shall be reserved for applications from cities within the State of South Dakota, or from local authorities, agencies, and organizations within that State. The Committee is concerned that many welfare recipients who need transportation assistance in order to take advantage of employment opportunities are in rural areas of the country where there is little or no public transportation. The Committee directs the Federal Transportation Administration to ensure that at least one-quarter of the available funds for access to jobs grants, $10,000,000, be competitively awarded as grants to entities (county governments, townships, public assistance organizations, rural transportation consortia, et cetera) who represent counties that currently have no public transportation. For many isolated and rural counties, the only hope that their residents have to access employment opportunities is through the provision of some form of public transportation. The very limited tax base of these counties may also preclude their providing significant levels of local funding to implement any form of public transportation system or service. The Committee recognizes that in certain urban areas, low-income individuals, welfare recipients, and other workers may have easy access to a local transit system, but less access to rail transit that reaches into job-rich suburbs. The Committee urges local governments, public transit operators, and metropolitan planning organizations to work together to explore low-cost, innovative ways of increasing mobility and access to jobs for welfare recipients, low-income individuals and other workers. In particular, the Committee directs the Chicago area transportation study [CATS] to work with the Regional Transportation Authority, Metra, the Chicago Transit Authority, the Northeastern Illinois Regional Planning Commission and members of the public to study and report on the feasibility, costs, and benefits of building additional Metra stops at points where Metra train tracks either cross or are near Chicago Transit Authority tracks and where Metra stations can be better connected to each other or to urban passengers. The committee believes that creating additional Metra stops at locations that allow for easy transfer between the CTA and Metra systems would provide many low-income individuals, welfare recipients and other workers access to jobs in the suburbs and at the same time would provide suburbanites with access to businesses, cultural events and entertainment in urban areas in addition to the city center where Metra passenger terminals are concentrated. The FTA Administrator shall publish in the Federal Register, as part of the fiscal year 1999 apportionments, allocations, and program information notice, an allocation list for all job access and reverse commute grants. The grants shall be categorized into three groups: reverse commute grants; access to jobs grants; and access to jobs grants for rural areas with no current public transportation alternatives. The grant allocation list shall include the following information: the name of the grantee, city or county, State, and amount. WASHINGTON METROPOLITAN AREA TRANSIT AUTHORITY [WMATA] Appropriations, 1998 $200,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 (highway trust fund) 50,300,000 Committee recommendation 50,000,000 Public Law 96 184 (Stark-Harris legislation) enacted January 3, 1980, authorized a total of $1,700,000,000 for construction on the Washington Metrorail System. In addition, the National Capital Transportation Amendments of 1990, Public Law 101 551, authorized another $1,300,000,000 in Federal capital assistance for a total authorized funding level of $3,000,000,000. Through fiscal year 1998, $2,949,700,000 has been appropriated, leaving a balance of $50,300,000. The Committee recommends an appropriation of $50,000,000 in general funds for WMATA. This brings the total budget authority and obligation limitation level to $5,365,000,000, the authorized cap for the mass transit category. Providing the full request level would exceed the transit program cap specified in TEA21. GENERAL PROVISIONS The Committee has included the following general provisions affecting transit programs: Sec. 311. This general provision gives FTA the authority to obligate previously provided funds above a particular fiscal year's obligation limitation. The provision has been broadened to include all FTA accounts, rather than just the discretionary grants program. Sec. 317. The term ``discretionary grants'' has been updated to ``capital investment grants'' in this general provision which provides that capital investment grant funds must be obligated within 3 years, or the associated funds will be available for expenditure and transfer to another capital investment project. Sec. 318. This general provision has been carried in the appropriations bill for many years. It allows FTA to update account names and transfer the associated funds to the new account structure. This bookkeeping authority will be necessary, given that the Transportation Equity Act has restructured the mass transit program. Sec. 347. This general provision directs that discretionary bus funds previously made available for the virtual transit enterprise information integration program may be used to fund any aspect of the project. Sec. 348. This general provision allows the State of Vermont to utilize the State's transit formula funds for Amtrak capital investment and operating support during the TEA21 authorization period, consistent with the provision made for the State of Oklahoma in the authorizing legislation. ST. LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION The St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation (the Corporation) is a wholly owned Government corporation established by the St. Lawrence Seaway Act of May 13, 1954. The Corporation is responsible for the operation, maintenance, and development of the United States portion of the St. Lawrence Seaway between Montreal and Lake Erie. The Corporation's major priorities include: safety, reliability, trade development, and management accountability. OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE (Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund) Appropriations, 1998\1\ $11,200,000 Budget estimate, 1999\2\ (mandatory) ........................... Committee recommendation 11,496,000 \1\Does not include reduction for TASC pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66. \2\Assumes enactment of authorizing legislation to provide mandatory payment estimated at $12,646,000. During 1996, the administration proposed that selected Government agencies restructure themselves as performance-based organizations [PBO's]. The St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation [SLSDC] is one of the candidate agencies. (Others include Department of Commerce seafood inspection; Patent and Trademark Office; National Technical Information Service; Defense Commissary Agency; Federal Housing Administration mortgage insurance services; Government National Mortgage Association; the U.S. Mint; and Federal retirement benefit service.) Each candidate agency coordinates with the ``National Performance Review,'' Office of Management and Budget, and Office of Personnel Management to develop authorizing legislation that is customized to meet its unique needs. It is the Committee's understanding that as a PBO, the Corporation would remain part of the Department of Transportation, but would be freed of certain departmental constraints. For instance, as a PBO the Corporation would be allowed to relocate its offices, streamline its organization, personnel, and procurement rules; would retain authority to conduct routine negotiations directly with the Canadian Seaway Authority regarding seaway operations; would retain authority to set its own policies and directives as they relate to operations; and would no longer be required to contribute to certain expenses shared by departmental operating administrations, such as the Transportation Administrative Service Center and reimbursable agreement costs. The administration did not request appropriated funds for the Corporation, as financing is proposed to be derived from a mandatory annual payment from the harbor maintenance trust fund [HMTF], based on 5-year average tonnage through the Seaway. The PBO proposal includes a formula-driven annual payment for fiscal year 1999 estimated at $12,646,000 from the HMTF. In addition to the trust fund revenue, the Corporation's fiscal year 1999 operating budget assumes $900,000 in non-Federal revenues. These other revenues include concession operations, reimbursable authority from the U.S. Coast Guard, shippers' payments for damage to locks, vessel towing services, pleasure craft/noncommercial tolls, and other miscellaneous revenues. This brings the total budgetary receipts to $13,546,000, of which the Corporation intends to transfer $1,809,000 to the reserve fund, leaving an operations and maintenance budget of $11,737,000. In addition, outside the operating budget, $1,040,000 in reserve funds will be utilized for capital replacements and improvements. COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION Authorizing legislation is necessary to establish the Corporation as a PBO and provide the financing mechanism that disburses the annual, formula-driven payment. Neither the Committee nor the Department is aware of any current or pending congressional action on PBO authorizing legislation. Therefore, the bill includes an appropriation of $11,496,000 from the HMTF, instead of the mandatory payment requested. This is $1,150,000 less than the amount the administration assumes would be provided as a mandatory payment from the HMTF for fiscal year 1999, and represents 2.6 percent growth over the enacted fiscal year 1998 funding level. The Committee recommendation includes the following reductions to the Corporation's budget: Reduce the emergency reserve fund to target level of $10,142,000 -$538,000 Reduce personnel compensation by amount associated with transfer of four FTE's (pilotage function) -392,000 Defer lower priority capital equipment purchases and projects -205,000 Hold travel to enacted fiscal year 1998 level -15,000 -1,150,000 Emergency reserve account .--One of the Corporation's management accountability goals is to increase the emergency reserve account to ensure contingency funding for catastrophic emergencies and funding of critical capital outlay needs. The Corporation's fiscal year 1999 budget proposes to transfer $1,809,000 to the reserve fund, in order to meet a yearend balance target of $10,680,000. (The PBO financial plan establishes a commitment to make annual contributions to the reserve account over the 5-year period fiscal year 1999 2003, assuming funds are available.) The Committee is not satisfied that the target level of $10,680,000 is necessarily the right target. Even in a catastrophic emergency (a double-lock failure, for example), a number of possible responses could be made, including a supplemental funding request from the Department, or reprogramming other replacement and improvement funds within the program budget. Great Lakes pilotage functions transfer .--On March 5, 1998, the St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation's authority to carry out the Great Lakes pilotage functions was revoked, and the functions were transferred back to the Coast Guard, where most pilotage functions were prior to late 1995. Four FTE's and associated personnel and benefit costs were attached to this function. The Corporation has stated that the total annual costs of these FTE's is $392,000. This function is no longer being performed by the Corporation, and the funds will not be required in fiscal year 1999. Capital projects and equipment/travel .--The Committee recommends a decrease of $205,000 in the Corporation's capital plan, providing a total of $835,000 for purchases of mechanical and electrical lock equipment, physical plant improvements, vessel traffic center upgrades, and navigational aids and channel maintenance equipment. The Corporation should fund its higher priority capital projects first and defer less pressing needs. Within the Corporation's operating budget, the Committee has also recommended $189,000 for travel, the same level as in fiscal year 1998. RESEARCH AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS ADMINISTRATION The Research and Special Programs Administration [RSPA] was established by the Secretary of Transportation's organizational changes dated July 20, 1977, and serves as a research, analytical, and technical development arm of the Department for multimodal research and development, as well as special programs. Particular emphasis is given to pipeline transportation and the transportation of hazardous cargo by all modes. In 1998, resources are requested for the management and execution of the Offices of Hazardous Materials Safety, Emergency Transportation, Pipeline Safety, program and administrative support. Funds are also requested for the emergency preparedness grants program. RSPA's two reimbursable programs--Transportation Safety Institute [TSI] and the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center [VNTSC]--support research safety and security programs for all modes of transportation. RESEARCH AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS Appropriations, 1998\1\ $29,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 29,655,000 Committee recommendation 29,000,000 \1\Does not reflect reduction for TASC pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66. Includes $1,000,000 supplemental funding pursuant to Public Law 105 174. The Committee has provided a total of $29,000,000 for the ``Research and special programs'' account, which is $655,000 below the administration's request, and is the same as the fiscal year 1998 enacted level. The following table summarizes the Committee recommendations: Fiscal year 1998 enacted\1\ Fiscal year 1999 estimate Committee recommendation Hazardous materials safety $15,342,000 $15,863,000 $15,863,000 Emergency transportation $1,993,000 $997,000 $997,000 Research and technology $3,446,000 $3,851,000 $3,651,000 Program and administrative support $8,171,000 $8,944,000 $8,489,000 ----------------------------- --------------------------- -------------------------- Total, research and special programs $28,952,000 $29,655,000 $29,000,000 (FTE) (189) (187) (186) \1\Includes $48,000 reduction for TASC pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66. Includes $450,000 reduction pursuant to President's line-item veto. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY The Office of Hazardous Materials Safety [HMS] administers a nationwide program of safety regulations to fulfill the Secretary's duty to protect the Nation from the risks to life, health, and property that are inherent in the transportation of hazardous materials by water, air, highway, and railroad. HMS plans, implements, and manages the hazardous materials transportation program consisting of information systems, research and analysis, inspection and enforcement, rulemaking support, training and information dissemination, and emergency procedures. The Committee recommends $15,863,000 for hazardous materials safety, which is the amount requested by the administration. Hazardous materials staff .--Since the beginning of fiscal year 1998, the Office of Hazardous Materials Safety has hired five employees; however, as of April 22, 1998, the Office still had five vacancies. The Committee directs that the Office halt recruitment efforts for any unfilled vacancies and hold staffing to the current onboard strength. The Committee estimates that the associated savings will amount to approximately $400,000. Hazardous materials research and development .--The Committee is concerned that an emergency rule promulgated by RSPA on cargo tank vehicles carrying liquefied compressed gases (for example, propane and anhydrous ammonia) may have the unintended practical effect of requiring a second attendant on vehicles when unloading. To assist in the timely development of improved liquefied gas delivery safety equipment, the Committee has increased the HMS research and development activity to $1,400,000 ($400,000 above the requested level), and directs that improved performance criteria for both passive and remote controlled shutdown systems on cargo tank motor vehicles be developed and published in the Federal Register by July 31, 1999. RSPA shall coordinate with interested industry members in a peer review of these performance criteria, and provide an interim progress report by letter to the Committee by April 30, 1999, on these improved performance criteria, industry's response, and progress in developing a permanent solution to the emergency shutdown equipment problem. General provision (sec. 323) .--Consistent with the February 13, 1998, U.S. district court preliminary injunction, the Committee has included a general provision that prohibits funds from being used to promulgate or enforce regulations that have the effect of requiring a second attendant while unloading liquefied compressed gas, in order to allow RSPA and the industry to work together toward retrofitting the cargo tank vehicle fleet with remote control shutoff devices. Emergency transportation Emergency transportation [ET] programs provide support to the Secretary of Transportation for his statutory and administrative responsibilities in the area of transportation civil emergency preparedness and response. This program develops and coordinates the Department's policies, plans, and programs, in headquarters and the field to provide for emergency preparedness. ET is responsible for implementing the Transportation Department's National Security Program initiatives, including an assessment of the transportation implications of the changing global threat. The Office also coordinates civil emergency preparedness and response for transportation services during national and regional emergencies, across the entire continuum of crises, including natural catastrophes such as earthquakes, hurricanes and tornados, and international and domestic terrorism. The Office of Emergency Transportation develops crisis management plans to mitigate disasters and implements these plans nationally and regionally in an emergency. The Committee recommends $997,000 for emergency transportation, the amount requested by the administration. Research and technology The Committee recommends $3,651,000 for the Office of Research and Technology, an increase of $205,000 over the 1998 appropriated level and $200,000 less than the amount requested by the administration. The additional funds provided will help the Department coordinate and strengthen its responsibilities under the new surface transportation reauthorization. The Committee notes the improvements in departmental research and technology planning and urges those efforts to continue consistent with the research and technology performance goals expressed in the new authorization bill. The funds provided will help support the R&T corporate management strategy specified in the Department's strategic plan, allow RSPA to support the intergovernmental transportation research coordination responsibilities of the National Science and Technology Council, and support a limited intermodal research program. Program and administrative support The program support function provides legal, financial, management, and administrative support to the operating offices within RSPA. These support activities include executive direction (Office of the Administrator), program and policy support, civil rights and special programs, legal services and support, and management and administration. The Committee has provided $8,489,000 for program and administrative support, $455,000 less than the administration's request. Electronic grant program -$100,000 Limit increase in information resource management contract support -155,000 Delete Garrett A. Morgan Program funding -200,000 The Committee directs that funds for the Electronic Grant Program be obtained within the agency's base program funding, and does not include additional funding for this purpose. The Committee has also limited the requested increase in information resource management contract support, and deletes the funding requested for the Garrett A. Morgan Technology and Transportation Futures Program. There are many national education programs already in place that encourage and enhance math, science, and technology literacy, and the Committee is unaware of an imminent shortage of engineers and other professionals in the transportation industries. PIPELINE SAFETY (Pipeline Safety Fund) (Oilspill Liability Trust Fund) Pipeline safety fund Trust fund Total Appropriations, 1998\1\\2\ $29,465,000 $3,300,000 $32,765,000 Budget estimate, 1999 32,163,000 3,300,000 35,463,000 Committee recommendation \3\30,659,000 3,500,000 34,159,000 \1\Does not reflect reduction for TASC pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66. \2\Includes $1,465,000 from reserve fund balances. \3\Includes $1,659,000 from reserve fund balances. The Research and Special Programs Administration is also responsible for the Department's Pipeline Safety Program. This activity is largely financed by user fees assessed to the pipeline operators and by fees paid to the oilspill liability trust fund [OSLTF]. The Pipeline Safety Program promotes the safe, reliable, and environmentally sound transportation of natural gas and hazardous liquids by pipeline. This national program regulates the design, construction, operation, maintenance, and emergency response procedures pertaining to gas and hazardous liquids pipeline systems and liquefied natural gas facilities. Also included is research and development to support the Pipeline Safety Program and grants-in-aid to State agencies that conduct a Pipeline Safety Program. Pipeline safety reserve fund .--The Committee recommends $1,659,000 to be derived from amounts previously collected in pipeline user fees from interstate liquid and natural gas transmission companies, which are maintained in a reserve fund by RSPA. The current balance of the pipeline safety reserve fund (as of March 30) is $28,300,000, but over the course of the year, some program costs will be warranted out. The fund takes in user fee collections, pays program costs, and also makes adjustments to collections due to over- or underpayments, so the balance varies over the course of each fiscal year. RSPA maintains that an end-of-year balance of at least $11,000,000 is necessary to sustain operations until fees can be collected to replenish the fund. Over the last 10 years, the end-of-year balance has ranged from $17,179,709 at the end of fiscal year 1988 to an estimated fiscal year 1998 end-year balance of $15,888,940. The Committee believes it is appropriate to drawdown against this balance as long as the $11,000,000 level is not broached. The Committee agrees with the authorizing committees and industry that the fiscal year 1999 cap on the portion of the OPS budget that can be raised through pipeline safety user fees--$29,000,000--should not be exceeded. Oilspill liability trust fund. --The Committee recommends $3,500,000 to be derived from the oilspill liability trust fund for implementation of the Office of Pipeline Safety [OPS] responsibilities under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 [OPA], $200,000 more than the administration's request. The following table summarizes the Committee recommendations: Program Fiscal year-- Committee recommendation\3\ 1998 enacted\1\\2\ 1999 estimate Operating expenses $11,608,000 $11,865,000 $11,865,000 Information and analysis 1,200,000 1,365,000 1,065,000 Risk assessment/technical studies 1,200,000 1,200,000 1,200,000 Compliance 300,000 450,000 300,000 Training and information dissemination 820,000 921,000 921,000 Emergency notification 100,000 100,000 100,000 Public education 400,000 200,000 400,000 Implement Oil Pollution Act 2,328,000 2,443,000 2,443,000 Research and development 1,165,000 1,919,000 1,365,000 State grants 12,000,000 13,500,000 13,000,000 Risk management grants 500,000 500,000 500,000 One-call grants 1,100,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 -------------------- --------------- ------------- Totals 32,721,000 35,463,000 34,159,000 \1\Includes reduction of $44,000 for TASC pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66. \2\Includes $1,465,000 from uncommitted balances in the reserve fund. \3\Includes $1,659,000 from uncommitted balances in the reserve fund. Information and analysis. --The Committee recommends $1,065,000 for the information and analysis program, $300,000 less than requested by the administration. This reflects a deletion of the proposed increase in information systems operations, bringing the activity to the fiscal year 1998 current services level. Compliance .--The Committee maintains that sufficient field engineering support staff is available to monitor remediation activities in addition to overseeing regularly scheduled inspections, and has not included the $150,000 requested increase above the fiscal year 1998 current services level. Public education .--The Committee recommends $400,000 for damage prevention public education activities, to accelerate work on the evolving one-call systems public education campaign. This represents a $200,000 increase above the requested level. The additional funds will be used for two purposes: to provide moneys that will be leveraged with private sector funds to advance the national one-call campaign; and to conduct a new joint public meeting with the NTSB on one-call systems. The forthcoming public meeting will serve as a forum to expedite the national one-call campaign, discuss best practices learned in dealing with one-call challenges, help publicize the national 800 number for one-call systems, and develop an agenda for the future of OPS involvement in damage prevention. Research and development. --The Committee has held OPS to the fiscal year 1998 program level, with the exception of a $200,000 increase in the mapping initiative. The Committee asserts that this increase should be funded from the oilspill liability trust fund because the data depicted will assist in the protection of environmentally sensitive areas. State grants .--The National Gas Pipeline Safety Act and the Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Act authorizes OPS to reimburse up to 50 percent of States' pipeline safety costs. In return, States inspect about 90 percent of U.S. pipelines. It is in RSPA's interest to give the States enough financial incentive to stay in the Pipeline Safety Program. The administration has requested a 12.5-percent increase in the State Grant Program for fiscal year 1999, from $12,000,000 to $13,500,000. Due to budgetary constraints, the Committee cannot meet this increase, but supports the initiative to get as close as possible to a 50-percent reimbursement level. The Committee recommends a funding level of $13,000,000 for the State Grants Program. One-call grants to States .--The Committee recommends that $1,000,000 be made available for grants to States and other entities for the development and establishment of one-call notification systems. The Committee notes that each year the States request significantly increased amounts of funding that exceed the amounts that have previously been made available. The Committee maintains that these funds will be of critical importance to helping the States make many improvements in one-call systems that they have judged to be of critical importance. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS GRANTS (Emergency Preparedness Fund) Appropriations, 1998 $200,000 Budget estimate, 1999 200,000 Committee recommendation 200,000 The hazardous materials transportation law (title 49 U.S.C. 5101 et seq.) requires RSPA to: (1) develop and implement a reimbursable emergency preparedness grants program; (2) monitor public sector emergency response training and planning and provide technical assistance to States, territories, and Indian tribes; and (3) develop and update periodically a national training curriculum for emergency responders. These activities are financed by receipts received from the hazardous materials shipper and carrier registration fees, which are placed in the emergency preparedness fund. The hazardous materials transportation law provides permanent appropriations for the emergency preparedness fund for planning and training grants, monitoring and technical assistance, and for administrative expenses. Appropriations, also from the emergency preparedness fund, provide for the training curriculum for emergency responders. COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION The administration has proposed increasing the annual level of funding under the Hazmat Registration Program from $7,372,000 to $14,300,000. Under the current registration program, an annual flat fee of $300 is assessed on carriers that transport: radioactive materials (in any quantity); class A or class B explosives (over 25 kilograms); extremely toxic inhalants (more than 1 liter per package); hazardous material in bulk packaging over 3,500 gallons or 468 cubic feet; or placarded hazardous materials in shipments of over 5,000 pounds. This affects approximately 26,000 shippers and carriers on the Nation's highways, railroads, waterways, and airways. Most of the fees collected under the registration program are used to make training and planning grants to States to improve emergency response to hazardous materials incidents. Under the administration's proposal, the overall funding for this program would be increased by $6,928,000. In order to pay for this increase, the administration proposes to raise the fee level and broaden the base of registrants. There are industry concerns, including issues of fairness relating to carriers in States that already impose registration fees for hazardous materials shippers, and concerning the use of up to 25 percent of the grant funds for small business programs that may not be directly related to hazardous materials transportation and handling. The Committee favors a more gradual increase in the Emergency Preparedness Grants Program, in order to allow RSPA and industry to more fully consider these issues. An incremental program increase could be built into the rulemaking process. The Committee recommends an appropriation of $200,000 for training curriculum activities, and directs that a ceiling of $11,000,000 be placed on fee collections, and a ceiling of $11,200,000 on the Emergency Preparedness Grants Program in fiscal year 1999. The bill includes a provision limiting the hazardous materials carriers' registration fees that are collected in fiscal year 1999 to $11,000,000. The following table details the activities of the fund based on the Committee's limitation on the registration fee collections. Fiscal year-- Committee recommendation\3\ 1998 enacted\1\ 1999 budget estimate\2\ Grants $6,572,000 $12,800,000 $9,700,000 Technical assistance 300,000 300,000 300,000 Administrative costs 300,000 300,000 300,000 Emergency response guidebook 700,000 700,000 Training curriculum 200,000 200,000 200,000 ----------------- ------------------------- ------------ Total 7,372,000 14,300,000 11,200,000 \1\Levels based on fiscal year 1997 collections. Includes $7,172,000 permanent appropriations. \2\Estimated levels, includes $14,100,000 permanent appropriations. \3\Estimated levels, includes $11,000,000 permanent appropriations. OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL SALARIES AND EXPENSES Appropriations, 1998\1\ $42,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 42,491,000 Committee recommendation 42,720,000 \1\Does not include reduction for TASC pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66. The Inspector General Act of 1978 established the Office of Inspector General [OIG] as an independent and objective organization, with a mission to: (1) conduct and supervise audits and investigations relating to the programs and operations of the Department; (2) provide leadership and recommend policies designed to promote economy, efficiency, and effectiveness in the administration of programs and operations; (3) prevent and detect fraud, waste, and abuse; and (4) keep the Secretary and Congress currently informed regarding problems and deficiencies. OIG is divided into two major functional units: the Office of Assistant Inspector General for Auditing and the Office of Assistant Inspector General for Investigations. The assistant inspectors general for auditing and investigations are supported by headquarters and regional staff. The Committee recommends $42,720,000. The recommended level includes funding for the inspector general to conduct their oversight mission mandated under the Inspector General Act, support the Department's priorities in the areas of safety, strategic investment in transportation infrastructure, and commonsense government, to provide an objective and credible voice on other issues of Departmentwide concern and to respond to emerging issues of congressional concern. SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD SALARIES AND EXPENSES Appropriation Required offsetting collections Allowed offsetting collecitons Appropriations, 1998\1\ $13,853,000 $2,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 $16,000,000 Committee recommendation 13,853,000 2,000,000 \1\Excludes reduction of $3,000 pursuant to section 320 of Public Law 105 66. The Surface Transportation Board was created on January 1, 1996, by Public Law 104 88, the ICC Termination Act of 1995. Consistent with the continued trend toward less regulation of the surface transportation industry, the act abolished the ICC, eliminated certain functions that had previously been implemented by the ICC, transferred core rail and certain other functions to the Board, and transferred motor licensing and certain other motor functions to the FHWA. The Board is specifically responsible for the regulation of the rail and pipeline industries and certain nonlicensing regulation of motor carriers and water carriers. Moreover, the Board, through its exemption authority, is able to promote deregulation administratively on a case-by-case basis. Rail reforms made by the Staggers Rail Act of 1980 also have been continued. The administration's fiscal year 1999 program request is $16,000,000 to perform key functions under the ICCTA, including rail rate reasonableness oversight; the processing of rail consolidations, abandonments, and other restructuring proposals; and the resolution of motor carrier undercharge matters. Under the administration's proposal this amount would be derived solely from user fees collected pursuant to 31 U.S.C. 9701 from the beneficiaries of the Board's activities. However, the Committee is convinced that fully fee financing the STB is not a viable option for fiscal year 1999. Such a proposal would require enactment of legislation and promulgation of new rules that are unlikely to be in place in time to ensure undisrupted funding for the Board. A possible legislative vehicle for such a user fee-based structure would be the reauthorization legislation which the authorizing committees may consider later this year. The Committee has provided $13,853,000 for activities of the Board, including statutory liability for severance payments. This amount will be augmented by the collection of user fees as provided under current law. The Board has informed the Committee that it anticipates collecting up to $2,000,000 from these fees. Bill language has been included to assure that fees received in excess of $2,000,000 shall remain available to the Board but shall not be available for obligation until October 1, 1999. In addition to making available up to $2,000,000 in fees collected in fiscal year 1999, the Board anticipates utilizing approximately $265,000 in fees carried over from fiscal year 1998, but not available until October 1, 1998. Combining the appropriated general funds, the anticipated 1999 user fees, and the carryover 1998 user fees, the Board will have a total budgetary resource level of $16,118,000. This exceeds the administration's request of $16,000,000, but is less than the funding request of $16,190,000 submitted by the Surface Transportation Board to the Office of Management and Budget. The Committee's recommendation will fund a total of 135 full-time equivalent [FTE] positions, the same number of personnel as are currently employed at the Board. TITLE II--RELATED AGENCIES ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD SALARIES AND EXPENSES Appropriations, 1998 $3,642,000 Budget estimate, 1999 3,847,000 Committee recommendation 3,847,000 The Committee recommends $3,847,000 for the operations of the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, the same funding level requested by the administration. The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (the Access Board) is the lead Federal Agency promoting accessibility for all handicapped persons. The Access Board was reauthorized in the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1992, Public Law 102 569. Under this authorization, the Access Board's functions are to ensure compliance with the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, and to develop guidelines for and technical assistance to individuals and entities with rights or duties under titles II and III of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The Access Board establishes minimum accessibility guidelines and requirements for public accommodations and commercial facilities, transit facilities and vehicles, State and local government facilities, children's environments, and recreational facilities. The Access Board also provides technical assistance to Government agencies, public and private organizations, individuals, and businesses on the removal of accessibility barriers. NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD SALARIES AND EXPENSES Appropriations, 1998\1\ $48,371,000 Budget estimate, 1999\2\ 47,200,000 Committee recommendation 53,473,000 \1\Excludes $5,400,000 in emergency appropriations. \2\The President's budget request also included an appropriation of $6,000,000 in user fees. The Independent Safety Board Act of 1974 established the National Transportation Safety Board [NTSB] as an independent Federal agency to promote transportation safety by conducting independent accident investigations. In addition, the act authorizes the Board to make safety recommendations, conduct safety studies, and oversee safety activities of other Government agencies involved in transportation. The Board also reviews appeals of adverse actions by the Department of Transportation with respect to airmen and seamen certificates and licenses. The Board has no regulatory authority over the transportation industry. Thus, its effectiveness depends on its reputation for impartial and accurate accident reports, realistic and feasible safety recommendations, and on public confidence in its commitment to improving transportation safety. The bill includes an appropriation of $53,473,000, which is $273,000 above the administration's budget request. The $273,000 increase is necessary to cover the annualized effect of the additional positions provided by Congress last year. The NTSB's salaries and expenses shall be distributed as follows: Staff (FTE) Budget authority Policy and direction 91 $12,150,000 Aviation safety 139 19,185,120 Surface transportation safety 96 12,242,360 Research and engineering 66 8,485,520 Administrative law judges 10 1,410,000 ------------- ------------------ User fees .--The Committee has denied the request to collect $6,000,000 in user fees. The Committee is opposed to such a fee because it makes certain transportation sectors (that is, the aviation industry) responsible for paying accident investigation costs while other sectors (that is, rail, highway, marine, et cetera) would not be responsible for these costs. In addition, such fees do not appear to meet existing definitions of user fees, and would essentially be new taxes. EMERGENCY FUND Appropriations, 1998 $1,000,000 Budget estimate, 1999 1,000,000 Committee recommendation 1,000,000 The bill includes an appropriation of $1,000,000 for the emergency fund to remain available until expended. Under Public Law 97 257 (Supplemental Appropriations Act, 1982), Congress provided a $1,000,000 emergency fund to be used for accident investigation expenses when investigations would otherwise have been hampered by lack of funding. The Committee notes that the Board has had to use the fund three times in the last 3 years. The fund was fully replenished in the fiscal year 1998 Transportation appropriations bill, and the current balance is $1,000,000. The Committee's recommendation doubles the size of the emergency fund to $2,000,000. At this level, sufficient funds should be available for unanticipated or unusually expensive accident investigations. The Committee has also included language to expand the eligible uses of the fund to include expenses associated with the provision of services to families of victims of transportation disasters. TITLE III--GENERAL PROVISIONS The Committee concurs with the general provisions that apply to the Department of Transportation and related agencies as proposed in the budget, with some changes, deletions, and additions. These are noted below: Sec. 305. Modifies a requested provision to prohibit the use of funds for the salaries and expenses of more than 91 political and Presidential appointees to the Department of Transportation. Sec. 310. This provision regarding the allocation of Federal-aid Highway Program funds is continued with modifications to reflect the passage of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century [TEA21]. Sec. 315. Deletes the requested provision allowing transfer authority between appropriated accounts, and includes provision prohibiting the use of funds to award multiyear contracts for production end items that include certain specified provisions. Sec. 316. Deletes the requested provision allowing expanded definition of capital in use of Federal transit funds, as it has been codified in TEA21, and includes provision allowing the State of Alaska to utilize allocated highway funds for projects of international origin or implications. Sec. 317. Modifies a requested provision to allow funds for capital investment grants, other than fixed guideway modernization projects, which are not obligated by September 30, 2001, to be used for other projects under 49 U.S.C. 5309. Sec. 319. Includes provision which the administration had requested be deleted that caps the amount of funds that may be used to support the Center for Advanced Aviation Systems Development. Sec. 320. Includes provision which the administration had requested be deleted that reduces the funds provided for the Transportation Administrative Service Center. Sec. 322. Includes provision that prohibits the imposition of requirements, not authorized in law, on applicants for funds under this act. Sec. 323. Prohibits the use of funds to promulgate or enforce any regulation that has the effect of requiring two attendants during unloading of liquefied compressed gases. Sec. 325. Requires public disclosure of the National Railroad Passenger Corporation's national average per passenger loss. Sec. 326. Includes provision which the administration had requested be deleted that prohibits the use of funds in this act for activities designed to influence Congress on legislation or appropriations except through proper, official channels. Sec. 327. Includes provision which the administration had requested be deleted that limits the amount available for advisory committees to $1,000,000. Sec. 328. Deletes unnecessary provision regarding odometer regulations, and adds provision that provides authority to mitigate leaking aboveground storage tanks in Alaska. Sec. 330. Includes provision which the administration had requested be deleted relating to compliance with the Buy American Act. Sec. 333. Modifies a requested provision regarding rebates, refunds, incentive payments, and minor fees received by the Department from travel management centers, charge card programs, and other sources, making such funds available until December 31, 1999. Sec. 334. Includes a provision which authorizes the conveyance of Coast Guard station property to the State of North Carolina. Sec. 335. Includes a provision that makes previously provided highway funds in Augusta, GA, available for a grade-crossing project in Augusta, GA. Sec. 336. Includes a provision allowing States the option of licensing commercial motor vehicle operators who operate solely within the State. Sec. 337. Provides that no approval from the Secretary (other than review of the project final design) shall be required to construct additional entrances and exits between exits 57 and 58 of Interstate 495 in Suffolk County, NY, provided such entrances and exits are designed, constructed or otherwise authorized by the responsible State transportation agency through the appropriate State environmental process. Sec. 338. Provides that the Secretary of Transportation shall enter into agreements with the New York State Department of Transportation that would allow automotive service stations or other commercial establishments for serving motor vehicle users to be sited and constructed in the vicinity of exits 51 and either exit 66, 67, or 68 of the Long Island Expressway (Interstate 495) in Suffolk County. Sec. 339. Includes a provision which harmonizes current safety statutes by bringing bumper standards within the scope of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's exemption discretion for case-by-case determinations. Sec. 340. This general provision provides $30,000,000 out of available capital investment grant funds authorized under 49 U.S.C. section 5338(b)(2)(A)(i) to be made available for specified transit fixed guideway projects. Sec. 341. Includes a provision relating to the transportation of edible oils which directs the Secretary to issue regulations to comply with requirements set forth in the Edible Oil Regulatory Reform act. Sec. 342. This provision clarifies existing law regarding the definition of airplane in Public Law 96 487, subject to reasonable regulation. Sec. 343. This provision clarifies the eligibility of a rail grade separation project. Sec. 344. This provision clarifies the eligibility of a highway construction project in New York. Sec. 345. This provision waives repayment of any Federal-aid highway funds expended on the construction of high occupancy vehicle lanes or auxiliary lanes on I 287 in New Jersey. Sec. 346. This provision requires consultation with local officials during the construction process of a highway project in Milwaukee. Sec. 347. This general provision directs that discretionary bus funds previously made available for a transit information integration program may be used to fund any aspect of the project. Sec. 348. This general provision allows the State of Vermont to utilize the State's transit formula funds for Amtrak capital investment and operating support during the TEA21 authorization period. COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI, OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE SENATE Paragraph 7 of rule XVI requires that Committee reports on general appropriations bills identify each Committee amendment to the House bill ``which proposes an item of appropriation which is not made to carry out the provisions of an existing law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution previously passed by the Senate during that session.'' United States Coast Guard: $2,761,603,000 388,693,000 21,000,000 684,000,000 67,000,000 17,461,000 ........................... Federal Aviation Administration: 5,538,259,000 2,044,233,269 173,627,000 2,100,000,000 Federal Railroad Administration: Railroad safety 61,876,000 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(C), RULE XXVI, OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE SENATE Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, the Committee ordered reported en bloc, S. 2307, an original Transportation and related agencies appropriations bill, 1999, and an S. 2312, an original Treasury and General Government appropriations bill, 1999, both subject to amendment and both subject to appropriate scorekeeping, by a recorded vote of 28 0, a quorum being present. The vote was as follows: Yeas Nays Chairman Stevens Mr. Cochran Mr. Specter Mr. Domenici Mr. Bond Mr. Gorton Mr. McConnell Mr. Burns Mr. Shelby Mr. Gregg Mr. Bennett Mr. Campbell Mr. Craig Mr. Faircloth Mrs. Hutchison Mr. Byrd Mr. Inouye Mr. Hollings Mr. Leahy Mr. Bumpers Mr. Lautenberg Mr. Harkin Ms. Mikulski Mr. Reid Mr. Kohl Mrs. Murray Mr. Dorgan Mrs. Boxer COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE SENATE Paragraph 12 of rule XXVI requires that Committee reports on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any statute or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the statute or part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and (b) a comparative print of that part of the bill or joint resolution making the amendment and of the statute or part thereof proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through type and italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate typographical devices the omissions and insertions which would be made by the bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form recommended by the committee.'' In compliance with this rule, the following changes in existing law proposed to be made by the bill are shown as follows: existing law to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets; new matter is printed in italic; and existing law in which no change is proposed is shown in roman. TITLE 23--HIGHWAYS CHAPTER 2--OTHER HIGHWAYS 218. Alaska Highway (a) Recognizing the benefits that will accrue to the State of Alaska and to the United States from the reconstruction of the Alaska Highway from the Alaskan border to Haines Junction in Canada and the Haines Cutoff Highway from Haines Junction in Canada to the south Alaskan border Haines , the Secretary is authorized out of the funds appropriated for the purpose of this section to provide for necessary reconstruction of such highway. Such appropriations shall remain available until expended. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, in addition to such funds, upon agreement with the State of Alaska, the Secretary is authorized to expend on such highway highway or the Alaska Marine Highway System any Federal-aid highway funds apportioned to the State of Alaska under this title at a Federal share of 100 per centum. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, any obligation limitation enacted for fiscal year 1983 or for any other fiscal year thereafter any other fiscal year thereafter, including any portion of any other fiscal year thereafter, prior to the date of the enactment of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century shall not apply to projects authorized by the preceding sentence. No expenditures shall be made for the construction of such highways until an agreement construction of the portion of such highways that are in Canada until an agreement has been reached by the Government of Canada and the Government of the United States which shall provide, in part, that the Canadian Government-- * * * * * * * TITLE 49--TRANSPORTATION SUBTITLE VI--MOTOR VEHICLE AND DRIVER PROGRAMS PART A--GENERAL CHAPTER 301--MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY SUBCHAPTER II--STANDARDS AND COMPLIANCE 30113. General exemptions (a) * * * * * * * * * * (b) Authority To Exempt and Procedures. (1) The Secretary of Transportation may exempt, on a temporary basis, motor vehicles from a motor vehicle safety standard prescribed under this chapter or passenger motor vehicles from a bumper standard prescribed under chapter 325 of this title , on terms the Secretary considers appropriate. An exemption may be renewed. A renewal may be granted only on reapplication and must conform to the requirements of this subsection. * * * * * * * (3) The Secretary may act under this subsection on finding that-- (A) an exemption is consistent with the public interest and this chapter or chapter 325 of this title (as applicable) ; and * * * * * * * (c) Contents of Applications. A manufacturer applying for an exemption under subsection (b) of this section shall include the following information in the application: (1) if the application is made under subsection (b)(3)(B)(i) of this section, a complete financial statement describing the economic hardship and a complete description of the manufacturer's good faith effort to comply with each motor vehicle safety standard prescribed under this chapter , or a bumper standard prescribed under chapter 325 of this title , from which the manufacturer is requesting an exemption. * * * * * * * (h) Permanent Label Requirement. The Secretary shall require a permanent label to be fixed to a motor vehicle granted an exemption under this section. The label shall either name or describe each motor vehicle safety standard prescribed under this chapter, or bumper standard prescribed under chapter 325 of this title from which the vehicle is exempt. The Secretary may require that written notice of an exemption be delivered by appropriate means to the dealer and the first purchaser of the vehicle other than for resale. * * * * * * * 32502. Bumper standards (a) * * * (c) Exemptions. For good cause, the Secretary may exempt from any part of a standard all or any part of a standard -- (1) a multipurpose passenger vehicle; (2) a make, model, or class of a passenger motor vehicle manufactured for a special use, if the standard would interfere unreasonably with the special use of the vehicle. ; or (3) a passenger motor vehicle for which an application for an exemption under section 30013(b) of this title has been filed in accordance with the requirements of that section. * * * * * * * 32506. Prohibited acts (a) General. Except as provided in this section and section 32502 of this title , a person may not-- (1) manufacture for sale, sell, offer for sale, introduce or deliver for introduction in interstate commerce, or import into the United States, a passenger motor vehicle or passenger motor vehicle equipment manufactured on or after the date an applicable standard under section 32502 of this title takes effect, unless it conforms to the standard; (2) fail to comply with an applicable regulation prescribed by the Secretary of Transportation under this chapter; (3) fail to keep records, refuse access to or copying of records, fail to make reports or provide items or information, or fail or refuse to allow entry or inspection, as required by this chapter or a regulation prescribed under this chapter; or (4) fail to provide the certificate required by section 32504 of this title, or provide a certificate that the person knows, or in the exercise of reasonable care has reason to know, is false or misleading in a material respect. * * * * * * * PART B--COMMERCIAL CHAPTER 313--COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLE OPERATORS 31305. General driver fitness and testing (a) * * * (b) Requirements for Operating Vehicles. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (2) paragraphs (2) and (3) of this subsection, an individual may operate a commercial motor vehicle only if the individual has passed written and driving tests to operate the vehicle that meet the minimum standards prescribed by the Secretary under subsection (a) of this section. (2) The Secretary may prescribe regulations providing that an individual may operate a commercial motor vehicle for not more than 90 days if the individual-- (A) passes a driving test for operating a commercial motor vehicle that meets the minimum standards prescribed under subsection (a) of this section; and (B) has a driver's license that is not suspended, revoked, or canceled. (3) Any individual may operate a commercial motor vehicle solely within the borders of a State if the individual-- (A) has passed written and driving tests to operate the vehicle that meet such minimum standards as may be prescribed by the State; and (B) has a driver's license that is not suspended, revoked, or canceled. * * * * * * * 31311. Requirements for State participation (a) General. To avoid having amounts withheld from apportionment under section 31314 of this title, a State shall comply with the following requirements: (13) The State shall impose penalties the State considers appropriate and the Secretary approves for an individual operating a commercial motor vehicle when the individual-- (A) does not have a commercial driver's license , except as provided in paragraph (2) or (3) of section 31305(b) of this title ; (B) has a driver's license revoked, suspended, or canceled; or (C) is disqualified from operating a commercial motor vehicle. * * * * * * * ALASKA NATIONAL INTEREST LANDS CONSERVATION ACT, PUBLIC LAW 96 487, 94 STAT. 2464 Sec. 1110. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of this Act or other law, the Secretary shall permit, on conservation system units, national recreation areas, and national conservation areas, and those public lands designated as wilderness study, the use of snowmachines (during periods of adequate snow cover, or frozen river conditions in the case of wild and scenic rivers), motorboats, airplanes aircraft , and nonmotorized surface transportation methods for traditional activities (where such activities are permitted by this Act or other law) and for travel to and from villages and homesites. Such use shall be subject to reasonable regulations by the Secretary to protect the natural and other values of the conservation system units, national recreation areas, and national conservation areas, and shall not be prohibited unless, after notice and hearing in the vicinity of the affected unit or area, the Secretary finds that such use would be detrimental to the resource values of the unit or area. Nothing in this section shall be construed as prohibiting the use of other methods of transportation for such travel and activities on conservation system lands where such use is permitted by this Act or other law. * * * * * * * TRANS-ALASKA PIPELINE SYSTEM REFORM ACT OF 1990, PUBLIC LAW 101 380 8102 TRANS-ALASKA PIPELINE LIABILITY FUND. (a) * * * (1) * * * (2) Disposition of fund balance.-- (A) * * * (B) Disposition of the balance .--After the Comptroller General of the United States certifies that the requirements of subparagraph (A) have been met, the trustees of the TAPS Fund shall dispose of the balance in the TAPS Fund after the reservation of amounts are made under subparagraph (A) by-- (i) rebating the pro rata share of the balance to the State of Alaska for its contributions as an owner of oil , which shall be used to repair and replace bulk fuel storage tanks in Alaska so that such tanks comply with this Act and with other applicable federal and state laws ; (ii) transferring and depositing the remainder of the balance into the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund established under section 9509 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (26 U.S.C. 9509). * * * * * * * TRANSPORTATION EQUITY ACT FOR THE 21ST CENTURY, PUBLIC LAW 105 178 SEC. 1211. AMENDMENTS TO PRIOR SURFACE TRANSPORTATION LAWS. (a) * * * * * * * * * * (n) * * * (o) Modification of Substitute Project in Wisconsin.--Section 1045(a) of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (as amended by subsection (n) of this section) is amended in paragraph (2)-- (1) by inserting `after consultation with appropriate local government officials,' after `Wisconsin,'; and (2) by striking `shall' and inserting `may'. * * * * * * * SEC. 3021. PILOT PROGRAM FOR INTERCITY RAIL INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT FROM MASS TRANSIT ACCOUNT OF HIGHWAY TRUST FUND. (a) In General.--The Secretary shall establish a pilot program to determine the benefits of using funds from the Mass Transit Account of the Highway Trust Fund for intercity passenger rail. Any assistance provided to the State of Oklahoma or the State of Vermont under sections 5307 and 5311 of title 49, United States Code, during fiscal years 1998 through 2003 may be used for capital improvements to, and operating assistance for, intercity passenger rail service. (b) Report.-- (1) In general.--Not later than October 1, 2002, the Secretary shall submit to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs of the Senate a report on the pilot program established under this section. (2) Contents.--The report submitted under paragraph (1) shall include-- (A) an evaluation of the effect of the pilot program on alternative forms of transportation within the State of Oklahoma and the State of Vermont ; (B) an evaluation of the effect of the program on operators of mass transportation and their passengers; (C) a calculation of the amount of Federal assistance provided under this section transferred for the provision of intercity passenger rail service; and (D) an estimate of the benefits to intercity passenger rail service, including the number of passengers served, the number of route miles covered, and the number of localities served by intercity passenger rail service. BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93 344, AS AMENDED [In millions of dollars] Budget authority Outlays Committee allocation Amount of bill Committee allocation Amount of bill Comparison of amounts in the bill with Committee allocations to its subcommittees of amounts in 1999: Subcommittee on Transportation and Related Agencies: 300 300 300 300 Projections of outlays associated with the recommendation: \2\16,310 Financial assistance to State and local governments for 1999 in bill NA 725 NA 7,217 \1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority. \2\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority. NA: Not applicable. COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 1998 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL YEAR 1999 Item 1998 appropriation Budget estimate Committee recommendation Senate Committee recommendation compared with ( + or -) 1998 appropriation Budget estimate TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary Salaries and expenses $61,000,000 $61,930,000 -$61,000,000 -$61,930,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Subtotal 61,000,000 61,930,000 57,784,900 -3,215,100 -4,145,100 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Office of Civil Rights 5,574,000 6,966,000 5,562,000 -12,000 -1,404,000 Transportation planning, research, and development 4,400,000 4,710,000 8,328,400 +3,928,400 +3,618,400 Transportation Administrative Service Center (121,800,000) (165,215,000) ( +43,415,000) ( +165,215,000) Payments to Air Carriers (rescission) ( -2,500,000) ( +2,500,000) Payments to air carriers (Airport and Airway Trust Fund): Rescission of contract authorization ( -41,600,000) ( +41,600,000) Minority business resource center program account 1,900,000 1,900,000 1,900,000 Minority business outreach 2,900,000 2,900,000 2,900,000 Amtrak Reform Council 2,450,000 450,000 -2,000,000 +450,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total, Office of the Secretary 78,224,000 78,406,000 76,925,300 -1,298,700 -1,480,700 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Coast Guard Operating expenses 2,415,400,000 2,462,705,000 2,461,603,000 +46,203,000 -1,102,000 Acquisition, construction, and improvements: -9,000,000 +9,000,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Subtotal, AC&I appropriations 388,850,000 407,773,000 388,693,000 -157,000 -19,080,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Environmental compliance and restoration 21,000,000 21,000,000 21,000,000 Alteration of bridges (Highway Trust Fund) 17,000,000 20,000,000 +3,000,000 +20,000,000 Retired pay 653,196,000 684,000,000 684,000,000 +30,804,000 Reserve training 67,000,000 67,000,000 67,000,000 Research, development, test, and evaluation 19,000,000 18,300,000 17,461,000 -1,539,000 -839,000 Boat safety (Aquatic Resources Trust Fund) 35,000,000 -35,000,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total, Coast Guard 3,916,446,000 4,004,778,000 3,959,757,000 +43,311,000 -45,021,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Federal Aviation Administration Operations 5,301,934,000 5,631,130,000 5,538,259,000 +236,325,000 -92,871,000 Facilities and equipment (Airport and Airway Trust Fund) 1,900,477,000 2,130,000,000 2,044,683,269 +144,206,269 -85,316,731 Research, engineering, and development (Airport and Airway Trust Fund) 199,183,000 290,000,000 173,627,000 -25,556,000 -116,373,000 Grants-in-aid for airports (Airport and Airway Trust Fund): (1,600,000,000) (1,600,000,000) (1,600,000,000) Facilities, equipment and development -500,000 +500,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total, Federal Aviation Administration 7,401,094,000 8,051,130,000 7,756,569,269 +355,475,269 -294,560,731 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== (Limitations on obligations) (1,700,000,000) (1,700,000,000) (2,100,000,000) ( +400,000,000) ( +400,000,000) ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total budgetary resources (9,101,094,000) (9,751,130,000) (9,856,569,269) ( +755,475,269) ( +105,439,269) =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Federal Highway Administration Limitation on administrative expenses (552,266,000) (521,883,000) (320,413,000) ( -231,853,000) ( -201,470,000) Appalachian Development Highway system 300,000,000 200,000,000 -100,000,000 +200,000,000 Federal-aid highways (Highway Trust Fund): (21,500,000,000) (21,500,000,000) (25,511,000,000) ( +4,011,000,000) ( +4,011,000,000) Motor carrier safety grants (Highway Trust Fund): (85,000,000) (100,000,000) (100,000,000) ( +15,000,000) State infrastructure banks (Highway Trust Fund) 150,000,000 -150,000,000 Transportation infrastructure credit enhancement program (Highway Trust Fund) 100,000,000 -100,000,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total, Federal Highway Administration 300,000,000 250,000,000 200,000,000 -100,000,000 -50,000,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== (Limitations on obligations) (21,584,825,000) (21,600,000,000) (25,611,000,000) ( +4,026,175,000) ( +4,011,000,000) (Sec. 310 obligations) (1,597,000,000) (1,265,000,000) (1,207,903,000) ( -389,097,000) ( -57,097,000) ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total budgetary resources (23,481,825,000) (23,115,000,000) (27,018,903,000) ( +3,537,078,000) ( +3,903,903,000) =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Operations and research (highway trust fund) 74,901,000 87,400,000 +12,499,000 +87,400,000 Operations and research (highway trust fund) (limitation on obliga- tions) (72,061,000) (172,902,000) (72,000,000) ( -61,000) ( -100,902,000) National Driver Register (Sec. 402) 2,300,000 2,300,000 2,000,000 -300,000 -300,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Subtotal, Operations and research 77,201,000 2,300,000 89,400,000 +12,199,000 +87,100,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Highway traffic safety grants (Highway Trust Fund): (186,000,000) (197,000,000) (200,000,000) ( +14,000,000) ( +3,000,000) (Limitation on obligations): Highway safety programs (Sec. 402) (149,700,000) (166,700,000) (150,000,000) ( +300,000) ( -16,700,000) Occupant protection incentive grants (20,000,000) (10,000,000) ( +10,000,000) ( -10,000,000) Drugged driving incentive grants (5,000,000) ( -5,000,000) State Highway safety data grants (5,000,000) ( +5,000,000) ( +5,000,000) Alcohol-impaired driving countermeasures grants (Sec 410) (34,500,000) (39,000,000) (35,000,000) ( +500,000) ( -4,000,000) ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 77,201,000 2,300,000 89,400,000 +12,199,000 +87,100,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== (Limitations on obligations) (256,261,000) (403,602,000) (272,000,000) ( +15,739,000) ( -131,602,000) ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total budgetary resources (333,462,000) (405,902,000) (361,400,000) ( +27,938,000) ( -44,502,000) =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Federal Railroad Administration Office of the Administrator 20,290,000 21,573,000 21,020,000 +730,000 -553,000 Railroad safety 57,067,000 61,959,000 61,876,000 +4,809,000 -83,000 Nationwide differential global positioning system 3,000,000 -3,000,000 Railroad research and development 20,758,000 20,757,000 25,760,000 +5,002,000 +5,003,000 Northeast corridor improvement program 250,000,000 -250,000,000 Next generation high-speed rail 20,395,000 12,594,000 28,494,000 +8,099,000 +15,900,000 Alaska Railroad rehabilitation 10,000,000 10,000,000 +10,000,000 Rhode Island Rail Development 10,000,000 10,000,000 5,000,000 -5,000,000 -5,000,000 Grants to the National Railroad Passenger Corporation: 344,000,000 -344,000,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Subtotal, Grants to Amtrak 543,000,000 555,000,000 +12,000,000 +555,000,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Capital grants to the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Highway Trust Fund) 621,476,000 -621,476,000 Emergency railroad rehab and repair (emergency funding) (9,800,000) ( -9,800,000) Conrail Labor protection -508,234 +508,234 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Total, Federal Railroad Administration 931,001,766 751,359,000 707,150,000 -223,851,766 -44,209,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Federal Transit Administration Administrative expenses 45,738,000 10,800,000 -34,938,000 +10,800,000 Administrative expenses (Highway Trust Fund, Mass Transit Account) (limitation on obligations) (48,142,000) (43,200,000) ( +43,200,000) ( -4,942,000) ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Subtotal, Administrative expenses (45,738,000) (48,142,000) (54,000,000) ( +8,262,000) ( +5,858,000) =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Formula grants 240,000,000 570,000,000 +330,000,000 +570,000,000 Formula grants (Highway Trust Fund): (2,260,000,000) (2,280,000,000) ( +20,000,000) ( +2,280,000,000) ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Subtotal, Formula grants (2,500,000,000) (2,850,000,000) ( +350,000,000) ( +2,850,000,000) =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Formula programs (Highway Trust Fund, Mass Transit Account): (3,709,235,000) ( -3,709,235,000) =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== University transportation research 6,000,000 1,200,000 -4,800,000 +1,200,000 University transportation research (Highway trust fund, mass transit acct) (limitation on obligations) (4,800,000) ( +4,800,000) ( +4,800,000) ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Subtotal, University Transportation research (6,000,000) (6,000,000) ( +6,000,000) =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Transit planning and research 92,000,000 19,800,000 -72,200,000 +19,800,000 Transit planning and research (Highway Trust Fund, Mass transit account) (limitation on obligations) (91,900,000) (78,200,000) ( +78,200,000) ( -13,700,000) ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Subtotal, Transit planning and research (92,000,000) (91,900,000) (98,000,000) ( +6,000,000) ( +6,100,000) =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Trust fund share of expenses (Highway Trust Fund) (liquidation of contract authorization) (2,210,000,000) (2,446,200,000) ( +236,200,000) ( +2,446,200,000) Capital investments grants 451,400,000 +451,400,000 +451,400,000 Capital Investment grants (Highway Trust Fund, Mass Transit Account) (limitation on obligations) (876,114,857) (1,805,600,000) ( +1,805,600,000) ( +929,485,143) =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Capital Investment grants (Highway Trust Fund, Mass Transit Account) (limitation on obligations): (800,000,000) (902,800,000) ( +102,800,000) ( +902,800,000) ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Subtotal, Capital investment grants (2,000,000,000) (2,257,000,000) ( +257,000,000) ( +2,257,000,000) =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Major capital investments (Highway Trust Fund, Mass Transit Account) (liquidation of contract authority) (1,900,000,000) ( -1,900,000,000) Mass transit capital fund (Highway Trust Fund) (liquidation of contract authorization) (2,350,000,000) (1,805,600,000) ( -544,400,000) ( +1,805,600,000) Discretionary grants (Highway Trust Fund, Mass Transit Account) (rescission of contract authorization) -392,000,000 -392,000,000 -392,000,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Job access and reverse commute grants 10,000,000 +10,000,000 +10,000,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Subtotal, Job access and reverse commute grants ( -342,000,000) ( -342,000,000) ( -342,000,000) =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority 200,000,000 50,000,000 -150,000,000 +50,000,000 Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (Highway Trust Fund, Mass Transit Account) 50,300,000 -50,300,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Total, Federal Transit Administration 583,738,000 50,300,000 1,113,200,000 +529,462,000 +1,062,900,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== (Limitations on obligations) (2,260,000,000) (4,725,391,857) (4,251,800,000) ( +1,991,800,000) ( -473,591,857) ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total budgetary resources (2,843,738,000) (4,775,691,857) (5,365,000,000) ( +2,521,262,000) ( +589,308,143) =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation Operations and maintenance (Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund) 11,200,000 11,496,000 +296,000 +11,496,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Research and Special Programs Administration Research and special programs 29,000,000 29,655,000 29,000,000 -655,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Subtotal, research and special programs (29,450,000) (29,655,000) (29,000,000) ( -450,000) ( -655,000) =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Pipeline safety (Pipeline Safety Fund) 28,000,000 32,163,000 29,000,000 +1,000,000 -3,163,000 Pipeline safety (Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund) 3,300,000 3,300,000 3,500,000 +200,000 +200,000 Pipeline safety reserve fund (Pipeline safety fund) 1,659,000 +1,659,000 +1,659,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Subtotal, Pipeline safety 31,300,000 35,463,000 34,159,000 +2,859,000 -1,304,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Emergency preparedness grants: Emergency preparedness fund 200,000 200,000 200,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total, Research and Special Programs Admin 60,500,000 65,318,000 63,359,000 +2,859,000 -1,959,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Office of Inspector General Salaries and expenses 42,000,000 42,491,000 42,720,000 +720,000 +229,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Surface Transportation Board Salaries and expenses 13,853,000 16,000,000 13,853,000 -2,147,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== General Provisions Transportation Administrative Service Center reduction -3,000,000 -10,500,000 -7,500,000 -10,500,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Net total, title I, Department of Transportation 12,661,157,766 13,296,082,000 13,631,929,569 +970,771,803 +335,847,569 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Appropriations (13,412,257,766) (13,296,082,000) (14,023,929,569) ( +611,671,803) ( +727,847,569) Rescissions ( -751,100,000) ( +751,100,000) =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Rescission of contract authorization -392,000,000 -392,000,000 -392,000,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== (Limitations on obligations) (25,801,086,000) (28,428,993,857) (32,234,800,000) ( +6,433,714,000) ( +3,805,806,143) (Sec. 310 obligations) (1,597,000,000) (1,265,000,000) (1,207,903,000) ( -389,097,000) ( -57,097,000) =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Net total budgetary resources (40,059,243,766) (42,990,075,857) (47,074,632,569) ( +7,015,388,803) ( +4,084,556,712) TITLE II--RELATED AGENCIES Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board Salaries and expenses 3,640,000 3,847,000 3,847,000 +207,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== National Transportation Safety Board Salaries and expenses 53,771,000 47,200,000 53,473,000 -298,000 +6,273,000 Emergency fund 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 ------------------- ------------------ ------------------------- -------------------- ------------------- Total, National Transportation Safety Board 54,771,000 54,200,000 54,473,000 -298,000 +273,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Total, title II, Related Agencies 58,411,000 58,047,000 58,320,000 -91,000 +273,000 =================== ================== ========================= ==================== =================== Net total appropriations 12,719,568,766 13,354,129,000 13,690,249,569 +970,680,803 +336,120,569