Table 2-2. Injured Persons by Transportation Mode

Table 2-2. Injured Persons by Transportation Mode

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  1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999
Aira                               
U.S. air carrierb N N 107 81 19 30 29 26 7 18 31 25 77 39 28 57
Commuter carrierc N N N N 14 16 11 31 7 2 32 25 2 1 2 2
On-demand air taxid N N N N 43 41 36 26 19 24 32 14 20 23 R10 14
General aviatione N N 715 769 R681 483 402 429 391 383 408 395 359 365 R330 325
Highway                               
Passenger car occupants N N N N N N 2,376,000 2,235,000 2,232,000 2,265,000 2,364,000 2,469,000 2,458,000 2,341,000 2,201,000 2,138,000
Motorcyclists N N N N N N 84,000 80,000 65,000 59,000 57,000 57,000 55,000 53,000 49,000 50,000
Truck occupantsf N N N N N N 547,000 591,000 579,000 633,000 661,000 752,000 794,000 786,000 792,000 880,000
Bus occupants N N N N N N 33,000 21,000 20,000 17,000 16,000 19,000 20,000 17,000 16,000 22,000
Pedestrians N N N N N N 105,000 88,000 89,000 94,000 92,000 86,000 82,000 77,000 69,000 85,000
Pedalcyclists N N N N N N 75,000 67,000 63,000 68,000 62,000 67,000 58,000 58,000 53,000 51,000
Otherg N N N N N N 11,000 15,000 22,000 13,000 13,000 14,000 15,000 17,000 12,000 10,000
Total highwayR N N N N N N 3,231,000 3,097,000 3,070,000 3,149,000 3,266,000 3,465,000 R3,483,000 3,348,000 3,192,000 3,236,000
Railroadh                               
Highway-rail grade crossing 3,367 3,725 3,272 3,860 3,550 2,687 2,407 2,094 1,975 1,837 1,961 1,894 1,610 1,540 1,303 P1,396
Railroad 16,113 21,930 17,934 50,138 58,696 31,617 22,736 21,374 19,408 17,284 14,851 12,546 10,948 10,227 10,156 P10,509
TransitiN N N N N N 54,556 52,125 55,089 R52,668 58,193 57,196 55,288 56,132 55,990 55,325
Waterbornej                               
Vessel-related N N 105 97 180 172 175 110 167 160 179 145 129 109 83 113
Not related to vessel casualties N N U U U U U U 1,633 1,542 1,807 1,916 1,298 947 357 399
Recreational boating 929 927 780 2,136 2,650 2,757 3,822 3,967 3,683 3,559 4,084 4,141 4,442 4,555 R4,612 4,315
Pipeline                               
Hazardous liquid pipeline N N 21 17 15 18 7 9 38 10 1,858 11 13 5 R6 20
Gas pipeline N N 233 214 177 108 69 89 80 R101 113 53 114 72 R75 87
TOTAL injured personsRU U U U U U U U 3,127,000 3,202,000 3,325,000 3,518,000 3,532,000 3,397,000 3,241,000 3,284,000

a Injuries classified as serious. See definitions of injuries in the glossary.
b All scheduled and nonscheduled service operating under 14 CFR 121. Since Mar. 20, 1997, 14 CRF 121 includes only aircraft with 10 or more seats formerly operated under  14 CFR 135. This change makes it difficult to compare pre-1997 data for 14 CFR 121 and 14 CFR 135 with more recent years' data.
c All scheduled service operating under 14 CFR 135 (commuter air carriers). Before Mar. 20, 1997, 14 CFR 135 applied to aircraft with 30 or fewer  seats. Since Mar. 20, 1997, 14 CFR 135 includes only aircraft with fewer than 10 seats. This change makes it difficult to compare pre-1997 data for  14 CFR 121 and 14 CFR 135 with more recent years' data.
d Nonscheduled service operating under 14 CFR 135 (on-demand air taxis).
e All operations other than those operating under 14 CFR 121 and 14 CFR 135.
f Includes light and large trucks.
g Includes occupants of other unknown vehicle types and other nonmotorists.
h Includes Amtrak. Figures include those injuries resulting from train accidents, train incidents, and nontrain incidents. Injury figures also include  occupational illness. Railroad injuries data for 1970 and before are not comparable with post 1970 data due to change in reporting system. Highway-rail grade crossing injuries are counted  under highway, except train occupants.
i Includes motor bus, commuter rail, heavy rail, light rail, demand responsive, van pool, and automated guideway. Transit injuries  include those resulting from all reportable incidents, not just from accidents.
j Vessel-related injuries include those involving damage to vessels, such as collisions or groundings. Injuries not related to vessel casualties include those from falls overboard or from accidents involving onboard equipment.

KEY: N = data do not exist; P = preliminary; R = revised; U = data are not available.

NOTES:
The motor vehicle injury data in this table come from the U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety  Administration's General Estimates System (GES). The data from GES, which began operation in 1988,  are obtained from a nationally representative probability sample selected from all police-reported crashes. The GES sample  includes only crashes where a police accident report was completed and the crash resulted in property damage, injury,  or death. The resulting figures do not take into account crashes that were not reported to the police or did not result in property damage. The 1993 National
Transportation Statistics (NTS) Historical Compendium and earlier editions used injury figures estimated by the National Safety Council, which used a different set of  methods to arrive at its figures. Thus, the injury figures in this edition of NTS may not be comparable with those found in the Compendium and earlier editions.
Numbers may not add to totals because some injuries are counted in more than one mode. To avoid double counting, the following adjustments have been made in the total injured row.
most (not all) highway-rail grade crossing injuries have not been added because most (not all) such injuries involve motor vehicles and, thus, are already included in highway injuries;
for transit, all commuter rail injuries and motor-bus, trolley-bus, demand-responsive, and van-pool injuries arising from accidents have been subtracted because they are counted as railroad, highway, or highway-rail grade crossing injuries.
The reader cannot reproduce the total injuries count in this table by simply leaving out the number of highway-rail grade crossing injuries in the sum and subtracting the above transit submodes, because in so doing, grade-crossing injuries not involving motor vehicles would be left out (see table 2-35 on rail). An example of such an injury is a bicyclist injured by a train at a grade crossing.

SOURCES:
Air:
U.S. air carrier:
1970-94: National Transportation Safety Board, Annual Review of Aircraft Accident Data: U.S. Air Carrier Operations (Washington, DC: Annual issues).
1995-99: Ibid., Analysis and Data Division, personal communications, Aug. 8, 1996; Mar. 10, 1999, and March 23, 2000.
Commuter carrier, and on-demand air taxi:
1980-94: National Transportation Safety Board, Annual Review of Aircraft Accident Data: U.S. Air Carrier Operations (Washington, DC: Annual issues).
1995-99: Ibid., Analysis and Data Division, personal communications, 1996, 1997, 1998, and March 23, 2000.
General aviation:
1970-94: National Transportation Safety Board, Annual Review of Aircraft Accident Data: General Aviation (Washington, DC: Annual issues).
1995-99: Ibid., Analysis and Data Division, personal communications, 1996, 1997, 1998, and March 23, 2000.
Highway:
1990-97: U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, National Center for Statistics  and Analysis, Traffic Safety Facts 1997, DOT HS 808 806 (Washington, DC: Nov. 1998), table 4.
1998: Ibid., Traffic Safety Facts 1998, DOT HS 808 983 (Washington, DC: October 1999), table 4.
1999: Ibid., General Estimates System Database and personal communication, Sept. 8, 2000. 
Rail:
Highway-rail grade crossings:
1960-70: National Safety Council, Accident Facts, 1974 (Washington, DC: 1974).
1975: U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Railroad Administration, Office of Policy and Program Development, personal communication.
1980-91: Ibid., Rail-Highway Crossing Accident/Incident and Inventory Bulletin (Washington, DC: Annual issues), table S.
1992-97: U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Railroad Administration, Railroad Safety Statistics Annual Report 1997 (Washington, DC: September 1998), table 1-1.
1998-99: Ibid., Office of Safety, Internet site http://safetydata.fra.dot.gov/officeofsafety/Prelim/1999/r11.htm, as of June 28, 2000.
Railroad:
1960-70: National Safety Council, Accident Facts, 1974 (Washington, DC: 1974).
1970-91: U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Railroad Administration, Highway-Rail Crossing Accident/Incident and Inventory Bulletin (Washington, DC: Annual issues), table 7.
1992-97: U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Railroad Administration, Railroad Safety Statistics Annual Report 1997 (Washington, DC: September 1998), table 1-1.
1998-99: Ibid., Office of Safety, Internet site http://safetydata.fra.dot.gov/officeofsafety/Prelim/1999/r01.htm, as of June 28, 2000.
Transit:
1990-98: U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Transit Administration, Safety Management Information Statistics (Washington, DC: Annual issues).
1999: Ibid., personal communication, Dec. 6, 2000.
Water:
Waterborne transportation:
1970-98: U.S. Department of Transportation, U.S. Coast Guard, Office of Investigations and Analysis, Compliance Analysis Division, (G-MOA-2), personal communication, Apr. 13, 1999.
Recreational boating:
1960-98: Ibid., Office of Boating Safety, Boating Statistics (Washington, DC: Annual issues).
1998: Ibid., Personal communication, Oct. 4, 1999.
Hazardous liquid and gas pipeline:
1970-99: U.S. Department of Transportation, Research and Special Programs Administration, Office of Pipeline Safety, personal communication; and Internet site http://ops.dot.gov as of June 28, 2000.