Table 3-21b: Average Wagea and Salary Accruals per Full-Time Equivalent Employee by Transportation Industry (North American Industry Classification System [NAICS] basis)

Table 3-21b: Average Wagea and Salary Accruals per Full-Time Equivalent Employee by Transportation Industry (North American Industry Classification System [NAICS] basis)

(Current $)

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  1998 1999 2000 2001 2002
All industries 35,201 36,754 38,846 39,660 40,318
Transportation and warehousing, total 36,297 37,612 39,463 39,439 40,138
Air 46,790 48,466 50,969 55,338 57,410
Rail 60,530 60,538 62,728 63,979 65,314
Water 47,422 51,803 51,361 54,847 55,341
Truck 34,533 35,341 36,736 36,203 36,945
Transit and ground passenger transportation 21,988 22,880 23,795 23,120 23,502
Pipeline 71,496 77,984 96,703 99,715 81,375
Other transportation and support activitiesb 33,444 35,299 36,806 35,846 37,275
Warehousing and storage 30,120 31,663 34,269 33,851 34,773

a Wages do not include supplements to wages and salaries such as pension, profit-sharing, and other retirement plans, and health, life, and unemployment insurance compensation.

b Comprises business establishments involved in scenic and sightseeing transportation, support activities for transportation, postal service, and couriers and messengers.

NOTES

Use care in comparing the data in this table with those in table 3-22. This table includes weighted part-time employees' salaries. Table 3-22 covers only full-time employees. 1998-2002 data are based on the 1997 NAICS codes.

The Bureau of Economic Analysis provides these data on a Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) basis ending in 2000 and on a NAICS basis beginning in 1998 (see table 3-21a for data based on SIC).

Wage and salary accruals consist of the monetary remuneration of employees, including compensation of corporate officers; commissions, tips and bonuses; voluntary employee contributions to certain deferred compensation plans, such as 401(k) plans; and receipts in kind that represent income. In other words, accruals are wage and salary earned, not wage and salary paid. For example, wage and salary earned in 1999 but not paid until 2000 are included in accruals for 1999. However, the difference between wage and salary earned and wage and salary paid is usually very small.

SOURCE

1998-2002: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis, National Income and Products Accounts, table 6.6d Internet site http://www.bea.doc.gov/bea/dn1.htm as of Feb. 24, 2004.