Table 2-31: Transit Safety and Property Damage Data

Table 2-31: Transit Safety and Property Damage Data

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  1990 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002e
Fatalitiesa 339 274 264 275 286 299 295 267 280
Injuriesa 54,556 57,196 55,288 56,132 55,990 55,325 56,697 53,945 19,260
Accidentsb 58,002 25,683 25,166 24,924 23,937 23,310 24,261 23,891 13,968
Incidentsa,b (includes accidents) 90,163 62,471 59,392 61,561 60,094 58,703 59,898 58,149 30,331
Vehicle-miles (millions) 2,490 2,620 2,605 2,702 2,833 2,927 3,002 3,090 3,084
Rates per 100 million vehicle-milesc                  
Fatalities (all reportable incidents) 13.6 10.5 10.1 10.2 10.1 10.2 9.8 8.6 9.1
Injuries (all reportable incidents) 2,191 2,183 2,122 2,078 1,976 1,890 1,889 1,746 624
Accidents 2,329 980 966 922 845 796 808 773 453
Property damaged (current $ millions) 38.0 46.3 57.6 55.5 61.5 55.3 58.9 73.1 32.2

a Totals do not include data for cable car, inclined plane, jitney, and ferry boat. These data appear in the footnotes for table 2-33.

b Accidents include collisions with other vehicles, objects, and people (except suicides), and derailments/buses going off the road. Incidents include accidents plus personal casualties (inside vehicles, inside stations, and boarding and alighting vehicle) and fires.

c Fatality and injury rates are based on total incidents including accidents and were calculated by dividing the number of fatalities, injuries, and incidents in this table by the number of vehicle miles.

d Total does not include property damage for cable car, inclined plane, jitney, and ferry boat, which were: 1990-$335,000; 1991-$410,000; 1992-$288,000; 1993-$221,000; 1994-$322,000; 1995-$3,263,000; 1996-$157,000; 1997-$67,000; 1998-$24,000; 1999-$104,000; 2000-$77,000; 2001-$1,605,246; 2002-$254,172.

e The drop in the number of incidents, accidents, injuries, and property damage is due largely to a change in definitions by the Federal Transit Administration, particularly the definition of injuries. Only injuries requiring immediate medical treatment away from the scene now qualify as reportable. Previously, any injury was reportable. In addition, in 2002 the threshold for reporting property damage was changed from $1,000 in transit property damage to $7,500 in total property damage.

NOTES

Data are provided only for transit systems that furnished safety data for inclusion in the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Transit Administration, Transit Safety and Security Statistics and Analysis, annual reports.

Transit vehicle-miles in this table differ from those reported in Chapter 1. The American Public Transit Association, which is the source for the vehicle-miles table in Chapter 1, includes all transit systems, while Transit Safety and Security Statistics and Analysis Annual Report covers only directly operated urban transit systems.

Prior to the 2000 edition, Transit Safety and Security Statistics and Analysis Report was entitled Safety Management Information Statistics (SAMIS) annual report.

SOURCE

U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Transit Administration, 2002 Transit Safety and Security Statistics and Analysis Report (Cambridge, MA: 2004), Internet site http://transit-safety.volpe.dot.gov/publications/Default.asp#Order and personal communication as of Sep. 9, 2004.