Table 2-2: Injured Persons by Transportation Mode

Table 2-2: Injured Persons by Transportation Mode

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  1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001n 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 (R) 2,007 2008
Air,a total N N (R) 822 (R) 850 (R) 757 (R) 589 (R) 485 (R) 515 (R) 456 (R) 430 (R) 484 (R) 452 (R) 467 (R) 417 (R) 369 (R) 406 (R) 357 (R) 368 (R) 337 (R) 367 (R) 303 (R) 304 (R) 290 291 289
U.S. air carrierb N N 107 81 19 30 29 26 22 19 31 25 77 43 30 67 29 19 24 31 20 14 9 16 16
Commuter carrierc N N N N 14 14 11 31 7 2 6 17 2 1 2 2 7 4 0 1 0 0 1 0 2
On-demand air taxid N N N N 43 44 36 26 19 24 32 14 22 23 10 15 12 24 16 12 17 23 16 20 13
General aviatione N N 715 769 681 501 409 432 408 385 415 396 366 350 327 322 309 321 297 323 266 267 264 255 258
Highway, total N N N N N N 3,230,666 3,096,870 3,069,603 3,149,164 3,265,928 3,465,279 3,483,319 3,347,614 3,192,035 3,236,238 3,188,750 3,032,672 2,925,758 2,888,601 2,788,378 2,699,000 2,575,000 2,491,000 2,346,000
Passenger car occupants N N N N N N 2,376,439 2,234,594 2,231,703 2,264,809 2,363,595 2,469,358 2,458,080 2,340,612 2,201,375 2,137,503 2,051,609 1,926,625 1,804,788 1,756,495 1,642,549 (R) 1,573,396 (R) 1,474,536 1,379,181 1,304,006
Motorcyclists N N N N N N 84,285 80,435 65,099 59,436 57,405 57,480 55,281 52,574 48,974 49,986 57,723 60,236 64,713 67,103 76,379 (R) 87,335 (R) 88,652 102,994 95,986
Truck occupantsf, light N N N N N N 505,144 562,601 544,657 600,874 631,411 722,496 761,478 754,820 762,506 846,865 886,566 860,527 879,338 889,048 900,171 (R) 872,137 (R) 856,896 841,451 768,410
Truck occupantsf, large N N N N N N 41,822 28,031 33,778 32,102 30,208 30,344 32,760 30,913 28,767 32,892 30,832 29,424 26,242 26,893 27,287 (R) 27,284 (R) 23,815 23,314 22,947
Bus occupants N N N N N N 32,691 20,959 20,144 17,056 15,767 19,214 20,291 16,887 15,559 21,958 17,769 15,427 18,819 18,174 16,410 (R) 11,133 (R) 9,839 12,141 15,149
Pedestrians N N N N N N 104,805 88,446 89,184 94,001 91,987 85,837 81,797 77,011 68,955 85,235 77,625 77,619 70,664 69,949 67,985 (R) 64,446 (R) 60,924 70,286 68,832
Pedalcyclists N N N N N N 74,903 67,088 62,691 67,916 62,489 66,572 58,158 57,802 53,379 51,290 51,160 45,277 48,011 46,378 41,086 (R) 45,439 (R) 44,012 43,481 52,395
Otherg N N N N N N 10,578 14,716 22,348 12,969 13,065 13,977 15,473 16,995 12,519 10,509 15,466 17,536 13,182 14,561 16,511 (R) 17,806 (R) 17,989 17,685 18,011
Railroad, totalh 19,480 25,655 21,206 53,998 62,246 34,304 25,143 23,468 21,383 19,121 16,812 14,440 12,558 11,767 11,459 11,700 11,643 10,985 11,103 (R) 9,264 (R) 9,192 (R) 9,511 (R) 8,710 9,603 8,789
Highway-rail grade crossingi 3,367 3,725 3,272 3,860 3,550 2,687 2,407 2,094 1,975 1,837 1,961 1,894 1,610 1,540 1,303 1,396 1,219 1,157 999 (R) 1,035 (R) 1,095 (R) 1,051 (R) 1,070 1,054 949
Railroad 16,113 21,930 17,934 50,138 58,696 31,617 22,736 21,374 19,408 17,284 14,851 12,546 10,948 10,227 10,156 10,304 10,424 9,828 10,104 (R) 8,229 (R) 8,097 (R) 8,460 (R) 7,640 8,549 7,840
Transit, totalj N N N N N N 54,556 52,125 55,089 52,668 58,193 57,196 55,288 56,132 55,990 55,325 56,697 53,945 19,260 18,235 18,982 18,131 18,327 20,944 23,105
Highway-rail grade crossingk N N N N N N N N N N N 195 184 126 58 159 123 74 108 117 153 194 172 224 271
Transit N N N N N N N N N N N 57,001 55,104 56,006 55,932 55,166 56,574 53,871 19,152 18,118 18,829 17,937 18,155 20,720 22,834
Waterborne, totall N N U U U U U U 5,356 5,128 6,144 6,165 6,064 5,737 5,321 4,992 5,112 5,008 4,856 4,666 4,066 4,095 5,245 4,422 3,947
Vessel-relatedm N N 105 97 180 172 175 110 170 171 182 154 254 120 130 152 150 210 192 227 198 140 177 190 152
Not related to vessel casualtiesm N N U U U U U U 1,503 1,398 1,878 1,870 1,368 1,062 579 525 607 524 602 551 505 504 594 559 464
Recreational boating 929 927 780 2,136 2,650 2,757 3,822 3,967 3,683 3,559 4,084 4,141 4,442 4,555 4,612 4,315 4,355 4,274 4,062 3,888 3,363 3,451 4,474 3,673 3,331
Pipeline, total N N 254 231 192 126 76 98 118 111 1,971 64 127 77 81 108 81 61 49 71 60 48 (R) 36 53 65
Hazardous liquid pipeline N N 21 17 15 18 7 9 38 10 1,858 11 13 5 6 20 4 10 0 5 16 2 2 10 2
Gas pipeline N N 233 214 177 108 69 89 80 101 113 53 114 72 75 88 77 51 49 66 44 46 (R) 34 43 63

KEY: N = data do not exist; R = revised; U = data are unavailable.

a Injuries classified as serious. See definitions of injuries in the glossary.

b All scheduled and nonscheduled service operating under 14 CFR 121. Since Mar. 20, 1997, 14 CFR 121 includes only aircraft with 10 or more seats formerly operated under 14 CFR 135. This change makes it difficult to compare pre-1997 data for 14 CFR 121 and 14 CFR 135 with more recent years' data.

c All scheduled service operating under 14 CFR 135 (commuter air carriers). Before Mar. 20, 1997, 14 CFR 135 applied to aircraft with 30 or fewer seats. Since March 20, 1997, 14 CFR 135 includes only aircraft with fewer than 10 seats. This change makes it difficult to compare pre-1997 data for 14 CFR 121 and 14 CFR 135 with more recent years' data.

d Nonscheduled service operating under 14 CFR 135 (on-demand air taxis).

e All operations other than those operating under 14 CFR 121 and 14 CFR 135.

f Large trucks are defined as trucks over 10,000 pounds gross vehicle weight rating, including single-unit trucks and truck tractors. Light trucks are defined as trucks of 10,000 pounds gross vehicle weight rating or less, including pickups, vans, truck-based station wagons, and utility vehicles.

g Includes occupants of other unknown vehicle types and other nonmotorists.

h Includes Amtrak. Figures include those injuries resulting from train accidents, train incidents, and nontrain incidents. Injury figures also include occupational illness. Railroad injury data for 1970 and before are not comparable with post-1970 data due to a change in the reporting system.

i Injuries occurring at highway-rail crossings resulting from freight and passenger rail operations including commuter rail. Highway-rail grade crossing injuries, except train occupants, are also counted under highway.

j Includes motor bus, commuter rail, heavy rail, light rail, demand response, van pool, and automated guideway. Transit injuries include those resulting from all reportable incidents, not just from accidents. Directly Operated (DO) modes only. The drop in the number of injuries in 2002 is due largely to a change in definitions by the Federal Transit Administration. Only injuries requiring immediate medical treatment away from the scene now qualify as reportable. Previously, any injury was reportable.

k Injuries occurring at highway-rail crossings resulting from operations of public transit rail modes including commuter rail. Data for injuries at light rail crossings are: 1995 (179); 1996 (171); 1997 (92); 1998 (42); 1999 (148); 2000 (111); 2001 (54); 2002 (76); 2003 (56); 2004 (62); 2005 (138); 2006 (44); 2007 (139); 2008 (86).

l Vessel-related injuries include those involving damage to vessels, such as collisions or groundings. Injuries not related to vessel casualties include those from falls overboard or from accidents involving onboard equipment.

m 1992-97 data come from the Marine Safety Management Information System. Between 1998 and 2001 the U.S. Coast Guard phased in a new computer system to track safety data, the Marine Information for Safety and Law Enforcement System. During that period data come from combining entries in the Marine Safety Management Information System with entries in the Marine Information for Safety and Law Enforcement System. Data for 2002, 2003, and 2004 come from the Marine Information for Safety and Law Enforcement System. Data for prior years come from other sources and may not be directly comparable.

n Other than the persons aboard the aircraft who were killed, fatalities resulting from the September 11 terrorist acts are excluded.

NOTES

Totals may not sum from the components due to rounding.

Highway numbers are not actual counts, but estimates of the actual counts. The estimates are calculated from data obtained from a nationally representative sample of crashes collected through NHTSA's General Estimates System (GES). Estimates are rounded to the nearest 1,000. Estimates less than 500 indicate that the sample size was too small to produce a meaningful estimate and should be rounded to 0.

SOURCES

Air:

1970-94: National Transportation Safety Board, Annual Review of Aircraft Accident Data: General Aviation (Washington, DC: Annual issues).

1995-2008: Ibid., Analysis and Data Division, personal communication, Nov. 9, 2009.

Highway:

1990-99: U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, National Center for Statistics and Analysis, Traffic Safety Facts 1999, DOT HS 809 100 (Washington, DC: December 2000), table 4.

2000-04: Ibid., General Estimates System Database and personal communication, Dec. 9, 2003, Oct. 12, 2004, Apr. 20, 2006.

2005-08: U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, National Center for Statistics and Analysis, Traffic Safety Facts (Washington, DC: Annual Issues), table 4.

Rail:

Highway-rail grade crossings:

1960-70: National Safety Council, Accident Facts, 1974 (Washington, DC: 1974).

1975: U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Railroad Administration, Office of Policy and Program Development, personal communication.

1980-91: Ibid., Rail-Highway Crossing Accident/Incident and Inventory Bulletin (Washington, DC: Annual issues), table S.

1991-99: Ibid., Interim Railroad Safety Statistics Annual Report 2002 (Washington, DC: August 2003), table 1-1.

2000-08: Ibid., available at http://safetydata.fra.dot.gov/OfficeofSafety/ as of Apr. 7, 2010.

Railroad:

1960-70: National Safety Council, Accident Facts, 1974 (Washington, DC: 1974).

1970-91: U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Railroad Administration, Highway-Rail Crossing Accident/Incident and Inventory Bulletin (Washington, DC: Annual issues), table 7.

1991-99: Ibid., Interim Railroad Safety Statistics Annual Report 2002 (Washington, DC: August 2003), table 1-1.

2000-08: Ibid., available at http://safetydata.fra.dot.gov/OfficeofSafety/ as of Apr. 7, 2010.

Transit:

Highway-rail grade crossings:

U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Transit Administration, Office of Program Management, personal communication as of Apr. 7, 2010.

Transit:

1990-92: U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Transit Administration, Safety Management Information Statistics (Washington, DC: Annual issues).

1993-2005: U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Transit Administration, Transit Safety and Security Statistics and Analysis Annual Report (Washington, DC: Annual issues), available at http://transit-safety.volpe.dot.gov/data/SAMIS.asp as of Sep. 4, 2007.

2006-08: U.S. Department of Transportation, Research and Innovative Technology Administration, Volpe Center, Transit Safety and Security Statistics and Analysis Program, personal communication, Apr. 7, 2010.

Water:

Vessel- and nonvessel-related:

1970-91: U.S. Department of Transportation, U.S. Coast Guard, Office of Investigations and Analysis, Compliance Analysis Division, (G-MOA-2), personal communication, Apr. 13, 1999.

1992-2008: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Coast Guard, Data Administration Division (G-MRI-1), personal communication, Apr. 7, 2010.

Recreational boating:

U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Coast Guard, Office of Boating Safety, Boating Statistics (Washington, DC: Annual issues), available at available at http://www.uscgboating.org as of Apr. 7, 2010.

Hazardous liquid and gas pipeline:

1970-2008: U.S. Department of Transportation, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, Office of Pipeline Safety, Accident and Incident Summary Statistics by Year, available at http://ops.dot.gov as of Apr. 7, 2010.