Table 1. Trends in U.S. International Trade, Trade with Canada and Mexico, Population, GDP, and Passenger Trips

Table 1. Trends in U.S. International Trade, Trade with Canada and Mexico, Population, GDP, and Passenger Trips

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  1990 1995 2000 Percentage change, 1990-2000 Annual growth rate (percent)
Population (millions)         
United States     249     263       281      13.2    1.2
Canada      28      30        31      10.6    1.0
Mexico      81      91        97      19.9    1.8
Gross domestic product (GDP)         
United States (billions of current $US)   5,744   7,270     9,963      73.5    5.7
United States (billions of chained 1996 $US)1   6,708   7,544     9,319      38.9    3.3
Canada (billions of current $US)     540     546       699      29.5    2.6
Mexico (billions of current $US)     240     262       575     139.0    9.1
Value of total U.S. international merchandise trade         
Billions of current dollars     907   1,341     1,997     120.3    8.2
Billions of chained 1996 dollars1     891   1,308     2,163     142.7    9.3
Value of U.S. trade with NAFTA partners (billions of current $US)     233     380       653     179.9   10.8
Thousands of passenger trips between the United States and:         
Canada 105,167  89,484    86,8272   -17.42 -2.1
Mexico 178,949 185,628   212,3212    18.62  1.9

1 To compare economic changes over time, current or nominal values of currencies must be deflated or adjusted for inflation. In the United States, the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) establishes indices to calculate changes between years. These are used to calculate real chained dollars. Annual changes in the indices are chained (multiplied) together to form a time series. Chained dollars, instead of merely reflecting inflation, capture the effect of relative changes in prices and in the composition of output. They also better reflect cyclical fluctuations in the economy. Chained 1996 dollars are the most currently available indices from BEA for adjusting for inflation.
2 For this category, the last data year is 1999, not 2000, and the percentage change column covers 1990-1999.

SOURCES: Data for trade, population, and GDP for 1990 and 1995U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics; U.S. Department of Commerce, U.S. Census Bureau; Statistics Canada; Transport Canada; Instituto Mexicano del Transporte; Instituto Nacional de Estadística, Geografía e Informática; and Secretaría de Comunicaciones y Transportes, North American Transportation in Figures: English Edition, BTS00-05 (Washington, DC: Bureau of Transportation Statistics, 2000). Trade data for 2000Based on U.S. Department of Commerce, U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Merchandise Trade Data; and U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Transborder Surface Freight Data.

U.S. population data for 2000U.S. Department of Commerce, U.S. Census Bureau.

Canadian population data for 2000Statistics Canada.

Mexican population data for 2000Instituto Nacional de Estadística, Geografía e Informática, available at http://www.inegi.gob.mx/estadistica/ingles/sociodem/fisociodemografia.html.

U.S. GDP for 2000U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis data, available at http://www.ita.doc.gov/td/industry/otea/usfth/aggregate/HL00T05.txt.

Canadian GDP for 2000Statistics Canada, available at http://www.statcan.ca/english/Pgdb/Economy/econom.htm#nat.

Mexican GDP for 2000Instituto Nacional de Estadística, Geografía e Informática, available at http://www.inegi.gob.mx/estadistica/ingles/economia/fieconomia.html.

Data for passenger trips between the United States and CanadaStatistics Canada, International Travel, Travel Between Canada and their Countries (Touriscope), Catalogue No. 66-201-XPB (Ottawa, Ontario: Various years).

Data for passenger trips between the United States and MexicoBanco de México, Dirección General de Investigación Económica, Dirección de Medición Económica, Mexico City, D.F., 1999 and 2001.