1-3 Alcohol-Related Fatalities in Motor Vehicle Crashes by Person Type and Crash Type: 2009

1-3 Alcohol-Related Fatalities in Motor Vehicle Crashes by Person Type and Crash Type: 2009

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Crash Category Fatalities in categorya Alcohol involvementb % Alcohol involvementc
Occupants 28,936 11,890 41.1
Single-vehicle crashes 15,386 7,806 50.7
Two-vehicle crashes 11,458 3,443 30.0
More than two-vehicle crashes 2,092 641 30.6
Pedestrians 4,092 1,997 48.8
Single-vehicle crashes 3,736 1,806 48.3
Multiple-vehicle crashes 356 191 53.7
Pedalcyclists 630 252 40.0
Single-vehicle crashes 600 237 39.5
Multiple-vehicle crashes 30 16 53.3
Others/unknown 150 49 32.7
Total 33,808 14,188 42.0

a Total fatalities.

b Total alcohol-related fatalities.

c Alcohol-related fatalities as a percentage of total fatalities.

Notes: Catogory numbers may not sum to totals due to rounding.

A motor vehicle crash is considered to be alcohol-related if at least one driver or nonoccupant (e.g., a pedestrian or pedalcyclist) involved in the crash is determined to have had a blood alcohol concentration of 0.01 grams per deciliter or greater.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates alcohol involvement when test results of alcohol concentration are unknown.

The 2009 data is preliminary.

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) Database, personal communication, November 2010 as cited in USDOT, RITA, BTS, National Transportation Statistics, table 2-20, available at http://www.bts.gov/publications/national_transportation_statistics/ as of January 2011.