Table 2-16: Recreational Boating Accidents: 2001

Table 2-16: Recreational Boating Accidents: 2001

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State Number of accidents Number of persons
Total Fatal Nonfatal injury Property damage Killed Injured
Alabama 87 16 39 32 17 65
Alaska 64 20 19 25 21 48
Arizona 222 7 136 79 7 170
Arkansas 75 12 32 31 13 51
California 771 43 385 343 48 502
Colorado 74 7 39 28 10 42
Connecticut 39 4 19 16 4 36
Delaware 23 1 11 11 1 13
District of Columbia 6 0 2 4 0 2
Florida 993 47 392 554 52 522
Georgia 113 7 67 39 8 78
Hawaii 21 1 7 13 1 7
Idaho 46 7 25 14 8 37
Illinois 108 6 54 48 8 72
Indiana 120 9 54 57 14 63
Iowa 36 1 28 7 1 38
Kansas 54 2 26 26 6 30
Kentucky 71 17 37 17 18 57
Louisiana 154 36 76 42 43 117
Maine 60 8 33 19 8 51
Maryland 186 14 93 79 15 130
Massachusetts 51 13 22 16 14 40
Michigan 299 25 176 98 28 201
Minnesota 125 15 71 39 16 92
Mississippi 64 13 31 20 15 42
Missouri 226 9 134 83 9 169
Montana 13 4 6 3 5 12
Nebraska 55 0 26 29 0 42
Nevada 109 4 54 51 5 82
New Hampshire 74 5 31 38 6 37
New Jersey 143 7 69 67 7 96
New Mexico 50 3 15 32 4 16
New York 223 17 106 100 25 142
North Carolina 179 15 108 56 17 148
North Dakota 10 0 5 5 0 5
Ohio 139 17 56 66 19 89
Oklahoma 86 5 53 28 5 76
Oregon 70 14 30 26 14 43
Pennsylvania 80 13 45 22 14 70
Rhode Island 27 3 7 17 4 11
South Carolina 123 16 53 54 18 68
South Dakota 23 1 13 9 1 16
Tennessee 132 11 79 42 11 103
Texas 206 36 109 61 41 165
Utah 83 7 46 30 8 67
Vermont 8 2 1 5 2 1
Virginia 152 16 83 53 19 110
Washington 117 24 51 42 33 77
West Virginia 15 4 7 4 5 10
Wisconsin 164 17 75 72 20 92
Wyoming 12 4 3 5 8 6
United States, total1 6,419 588 3,151 2,680 681 4,274

1 Guam, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and offshore are included in the U.S. total.

NOTES: 1997 was the first year statistics were compiled for accidents that occurred three or more miles offshore in the Atlantic Ocean and Pacific Ocean and nine miles offshore in the Gulf of Mexico. An accident is listed under one category only, with fatal being the highest priority, followed by nonfatal injury, followed by property damage. For example, if two vessels are in an accident resulting in a fatality and a nonfatal injury, the accident is counted as a fatal accident involving two vessels.

These data do not include: 1) accidents involving only slight injury not requiring medical treatment beyond first-aid; 2) accidents involving property damage of $500 or less; 3) accidents not caused or contributed to by a vessel, its equipment, or its appendages; and 4) accidents in which the boat was used solely as a platform for other activities, such as swimming or skin diving. Such cases are not included because the victims freely left the safety of a boat. However, the data do include accidents involving people in the water who are struck by their boat or another boat.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Transportation, U.S. Coast Guard, Boating Statistics, 2001, Washington, DC: 2002, available at http://www.uscgboating.org/Saf/pdf/Boating_Statistics_2001.pdf as of Sept. 16, 2003.