ALCOHOL-RELATED HIGHWAY FATALITIES

ALCOHOL-RELATED HIGHWAY FATALITIES

Fatalities in Alcohol-Related Motor Vehicle Crashes (annual data)

Fatalities in Alcohol-Related Motor Vehicle Crashes (annual data) - Thousands of Fatalities

Fatalities in Alcohol-Related Motor Vehicle Crashes (annual data)

Fatalities in Alcohol-Related Motor Vehicle Crashes (annual data) - Percent of Total Highway Fatalities

Alcohol is the single largest cause of fatal crashes. Alcohol-related fatalities accounted for nearly 38 percent of all highway fatalities in 2000.

Fatalities include those arising from motor vehicle related crashes in which the driver and/or a fatally injured pedestrian or other nonmotorist had a measured or estimated blood alcohol content of 0.01 grams per deciliter or greater.

Alcohol-Related Highway Fatalities 1999 2000
Total 15,786 16,068
Alcohol-Related Highway Fatalities percent change from previous year  -1.46   1.79

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, National Center for Statistics and Analysis, Traffic Safety Facts 1998, DOT HS 808 983 (Washington, DC: October 1999), table 13, and personal communication, Sept. 11, 2000. 2000 data: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, National Center for Statistics and Analysis, 2000 Early Assessment.