Table 6-1 - Transportation Data Needs

Table 6-1 - Transportation Data Needs

What data are needed on passenger and freight transportation? How are these data useful for public policy, infrastructure planning, and market analysis?
Who travels? How much travel? What moves? How much moves? Shows source of transportation demand and most direct beneficiaries of transportation investment.
Why do people travel? How valuable is the material being moved? Indicates relative importance of serving the demand for transportation.
How far do people travel? How far do goods move? Provides an aggregate measure of transportation consumed.
From where to where? Shows location of transportation facilities and services consumed; geographic regions and corridors affected.
What is the main mode used? Provides basic input for debates on intermodal issues.
What other modes were used? Indicates demand for intermodal connections and local access.
Do the links, nodes, and service providers cover current and anticipated origins and destinations? Is a basic system performance measure.
How much of the system capacity (links, nodes, vehicles, and services) are consumed by current and anticipated travel and goods movement? Indicates physical capacity of the system to provide service for basic transportation demand.
How timely is travel and goods movement between origins and destinations? (Traveltime, system speed) Shows how effective the system is for the user; is a major component of user satisfaction, economic productivity, and international competitiveness.
How reliable are the trips and goods movements between origins and destinations? Shows how effective the system is for the user; is a major component of user satisfaction, economic productivity, and international competitiveness.
How much does it cost to provide transportation services and infrastructure? Indicates the efficiency of the transportation system.
How much do shippers and travelers spend to use services and infrastructure? Shows how efficient the system is for the user; indicates the consequences for economic productivity and international competitiveness; provides input for market analysis.
How much of the costs for services and infrastructure are covered by users, the public sector, or others? Provides input for analyses of investment, cost allocation, and privatization issues.
How likely is the traveler to be hurt or luggage lost or damaged? How likely is the shipment to be damaged, lost, or stolen? Indicates safety and security.
Who is the service provider? Identifies the direct beneficiaries of transportation investment; provides accountability.
What is the financial condition of the service provider? Identifies the ability of providers to maintain and improve performance and safety, susceptibility to foreign ownership and legal complications.
If the travel is for business, what industry is being served? For goods movement, who are the shippers and receivers? Identifies the economic sectors receiving direct benefits from transportation investments.
Who else is dependent on the travel or the shipment? Identifies others receiving direct benefits from transportation investments.
How much damage is done to the physical infrastructure and which users are causing the damage? Establishes investment needs; indicates where costs should be allocated among users and others.
What is the risk of health-related mishaps? Identifies safety risks; can present special risks for hazardous materials.
What are the effects on air and water quality, noise, and other environmental concerns? Mandated by environmental legislation; provides information for the ongoing debate between environmental concerns and interstate commerce.
How much energy is consumed? Provides basic information on energy conservation and for national security issues and global climate change.
Who and what are affected by these externalities? Identifies the societal and environmental consequences of transportation, in addition to how endangered species are affected.