TABLE 15-3a Change in Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Mode: 1993-2003

TABLE 15-3a Change in Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Mode: 1993-2003

1993 = 100

Excel | CSV | Graphic Version

  1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003
Passenger cars 100 101 101 102 102 105 106 107 107 109 108
Light-duty trucks 100 102 106 110 113 116 120 121 122 125 128
All other trucks 100 107 111 117 123 128 134 141 144 144 150
Buses 100 105 104 111 114 117 130 128 121 115 112
Total highway 100 102 105 108 110 113 116 118 119 121 123
Aircraft 100 105 102 107 106 108 111 115 109 104 102
Ships and boats 100 99 102 99 71 60 78 116 79 106 106
Locomotives 100 108 112 117 115 116 120 120 123 118 123
Other 100 108 109 110 116 104 106 105 99 105 100
Total, all modes 100 103 105 107 108 110 114 117 116 118 119
International bunker fuels 100 102 106 108 115 112 111 111 107 97 91

NOTES: To make it easier to compare data of differing magnitudes over time, the Bureau of Transportation Statistics divided the data for all years in each category (see table 15-3b) by the initial year value and multiplied the result by 100.

Highway total includes passenger cars, buses, light-duty trucks, and other trucks. Other carbon dioxide emissions are from motorcycles, construction equipment, agricultural machinery, pipelines, and lubricants. International bunker fuel emissions (not included in the total) result from the combustion of fuels purchased in the United States but used for international aviation and maritime transportation. Thus, aircraft and ships and boats data included in U.S. total emissions involve only domestic activities of these modes as do all other data shown. The large annual variations in ships and boats data may result from methodological problems related to the domestic/international partition of maritime emissions. Economic factors may also contribute.

Aircraft emissions consist of emissions from all jet fuel (less bunker fuels) and aviation gas consumption. Alternative-fuel vehicle emissions are allocated to the specific vehicle types in which they were classified (i.e., passenger cars, light-duty trucks, and other trucks and buses).

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Transportation, Research and Innovative Technology Administration, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, calculations using data in table 15-3b.