TABLE C-16 Domestic Enplanements at U.S. Air Traffic Hubs: 1995-2007

TABLE C-16 Domestic Enplanements at U.S. Air Traffic Hubs: 1995-2007

Thousands of Passengers

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  Total enplanements Large hubs Medium hubs Small hubs Nonhubs
1995 526,055 392,602 85,929 33,561 13,963
1996 558,184 417,340 89,019 37,123 14,702
1997 568,616 426,246 90,780 36,299 15,291
1998 588,335 442,402 91,756 37,675 16,502
1999 610,629 458,665 96,395 38,645 16,924
2000 639,754 479,570 102,082 40,121 17,980
2001 595,365 413,634 124,588 42,834 14,309
2002 575,059 401,697 119,734 40,054 13,574
2003 593,132 424,621 109,493 43,546 15,473
2004 652,413 447,501 135,364 51,812 17,736
2005 690,136 473,367 143,749 53,292 19,727
2006 690,766 475,208 142,139 55,008 18,410
(P) 2007 712,627 488,299 147,068 57,501 19,760

KEY: P = preliminary

NOTES: Data are for all scheduled and nonscheduled service by large certificated U.S. air carriers at all airports served within the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and other U.S. areas designated by the Federal Aviation Administration. Not all scheduled service is actually performed. Moreover, for several years, total performed departures exceed total scheduled departures because nonscheduled departures are included in the totals. Prior to 1993, all scheduled and some nonscheduled enplanements for certificated air carriers were included; no enplanements were included for air carriers offering charter service only.

Prior to 2000, air traffic hubs are designated as geographical areas based on the percentage of total passengers enplaned in the area. Under this designation, a hub may have more than one airport in it. (This definition of hub should not be confused with the definition used by the airlines in describing their "hub-and-spoke" route structures). Individual communities fall into four hub classifications as determined by each community's percentage of total enplaned revenue passengers in all services and all operations of U.S. certificated route carriers within the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and other U.S. areas. For 2000 and later, hub designation is based on passenger boardings at individual airports as designated by the FAA. Classifications are based on the percentage of total enplaned revenue passengers for each year according to the following: 1 percent or more = large, 0.25 to 0.9999 percent = medium, 0.05 to 0.249 percent = small, less than 0.05 = nonhub.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Transportation, Research and Innovative Technology Administration, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, National Transportation Statistics 2008, table 1-34, available at http://www.bts.gov/ as of May 2008.