Table 12 U.S. Containerized Exports and Imports by Coastal Port Regions, 2001

Table 12
U.S. Containerized Exports and Imports by Coastal Port Regions, 2001

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Coastal port regions TEUs Metric tons
Total Exports Imports Balance Total Exports Imports Balance
United States 18,081,155 6,812,808 11,268,347 -4,455,540 144,253,668 63,528,996 80,724,672 -17,195,676
Pacific Coast 9,303,551 2,952,246 6,351,304 -3,399,058 68,382,357 28,933,746 39,448,611 -10,514,864
Atlantic Coast 7,329,706 3,152,859 4,176,847 -1,023,987 61,891,151 27,561,870 34,329,281 -6,767,410
Gulf Coast 1,447,794 707,694 740,100 -32,407 13,979,592 7,033,325 6,946,267 87,058
Great Lakes 104 8 96 -88 568 55 514 -459

Coastal port regions TEUs (percent) Metric tons (percent)
Total Exports Imports Total Exports Imports
United States 100 100 100 100 100 100
Pacific Coast 51 43 56 47 46 49
Atlantic Coast 41 46 37 43 43 43
Gulf Coast 8 10 7 10 11 9
Great Lakes <1 <1 <1 <1 <1 <1

NOTE: TEUS = 20-foot equivalent units. One 20-foot container equals 1 TEU while one 40-foot container equals 2 TEUs. The data in this table include only loaded containers engaged in U.S. international maritime activity, including U.S. imports, exports, and transshipments. Transshipments are shipments neither originating nor are destined for the United States but passing through it from one foreign country to another. For example, an automobile component shipped from Japan and destined for Mexico, may pass through the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach before being trucked to Mexico. Therefore the trade levels will be greater than those reported in U.S. international trade statistics, which exclude transshipments. The data also exclude military shipments. Pacific Coast incldues ports in Alaska and Hawaii. One metric ton equals 1.1 short tons.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration, may 2002; based on Journal of Commerce, Port Import/Export Reporting Service (PIERS), 2001 PIERS data.