Figure 2.4: Estimated U.S. Consumption of Vehicle Fuels, by Fuel Type, 2003-2006

Figure 2.4: Estimated U.S. Consumption of Vehicle Fuels, by Fuel Type, 2003-2006

Excel | CSV

(in thousand gasoline equivalent gallons)

Fuel Type 2003 2004 2005 2006
Alternative Fuels        
Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) 133,222 158,903 166,878 172,011
Electricity 5,141 5,269 5,219 5,104
Ethanol, 85 percent (E85)a 26,376 31,581 38,074 44,041
Hydrogen 2 8 25 41
Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) 13,503 20,888 22,409 23,474
Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) 224,697 211,883 188,171 173,130
Other Fuelsb 0 0 2 2
Subtotal 402,941 428,532 420,778 417,803
Biodieselc 18,220 28,244 91,649 260,606
Oxygenates        
Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE)d 2,368,400 1,877,300 1,654,500 435,000
Ethanol in Gasohol 1,919,572 2,414,167 2,756,663 3,729,168
Total Alternative and Replacement Fuelse 4,709,133 4,748,243 4,923,590 4,842,577
Traditional Fuels        
Gasolinef 135,330,000 138,283,000 138,723,000 140,146,000
Dieself 41,965,000 41,987,000 43,042,000 44,247,000
Total Fuel Consumptiong 177,697,941 180,698,532 182,185,778 184,810,803

a The remaining portion of 85-percent ethanol is gasoline. Consumption data include the gasoline portion of the fuel.

b May include P-Series fuel or any other fuel designated by the Secretary of Energy as an alternative fuel in accordance with the Energy Policy Act of 1995.

c Estimates for 2003, 2004, and 2005 are revised.

d Includes a very small amount of other ethers, primarily Tertiary Amyl Methyl Ether (TAME) and Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (ETBE). Values are rounded to the nearest 100,000 gasoline-equivalent gallons.

e A replacement fuel is the portion of any motor fuel that is methanol, ethanol, or other alcohols, natural gas, liquefied petroleum gases, hydrogen, coal-derived liquid fuels, electricity (including electricity from solar energy), ethers, biodiesel, or any other fuel the Secretary of Energy determines, by rule, is substantially not petroleum and would yield substantial energy security benefits and substantial environmental benefits.

f Gasoline consumption includes ethanol in gasohol and MTBE. Diesel includes biodiesel. Gasoline and diesel values are rounded to the nearest million gasoline-equivalent gallons.

Notes: Fuel quantities are expressed in a common base unit of gasoline-equivalent gallons to allow comparisons of different fuel types. Gasoline-equivalent gallons do not represent gasoline displacement. The estimated consumption of neat methanol (M100), 85-percent methanol (M85), and 95-percent ethanol (E95) is zero for all years included in this table. Therefore, those fuels are not shown. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

Original Sources: Alternative Fuel Consumption: Energy Information Administration, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels. Biodiesel Consumption: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting and U.S. Census Bureau. Ethanol Consumption: Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review, (February 2008). MTBE Consumption: Energy Information Administration, Petroleum Navigator, extracted February 2008. Traditional Fuel Consumption: Energy Information Administration, Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 1 (September 2007). Highway use of gasoline was estimated as 98.8 percent of consumption, based on data in the Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 26, prepared by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (May 2007). Diesel consumption was adjusted for highway use by multiplying by .61 derived from Energy Information Administration, Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 2005 (December 2007). Diesel consumption was converted to gasoline-equivalent-gallons using heating values from the Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review, (February 2008), Appendix A.

Source: U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration, http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/alternate/page/atftables/afvtransfuel_II.html#consumption.